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Biographical Notices of Clare-born in Australian Newspapers 1913 - 1920

Title: Biographical Notices of Clare-born in Australian Newspapers 1913 - 1920
Type: Australian Biographical Newspaper Extracts
Dates: 1 January 1913 - 31 December 1920
Place: Australia
Source: National Library of Australia
TROVE http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper
Transcriber/Donator: Margaret O’Heir, Queensland, Australia

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 13 January 1913 p 10 Article
A LAND DISPUTE.
DISTURBANCE IN IRELAND.
LONDON, January 11.
At Ennis, county Clare, yesterday James Gavin and Pat Kelly were remanded on a charge of grievously wounding Mr. Macnamara, a barrister, at his residence, Leamnaleahy, Clare. The parties had a dispute over some land, and the accused are said to have fired a gun at Macnamara.

The Western Champion and General Advertiser for the Central-Western Districts (Barcaldine, Qld. : 1892 - 1922) Saturday 25 January 1913 p 12 Article
Magisterial Enquiry.
The Drowning Affair at the 14 Mile Dam.
The magisterial enquiry opened last week by Mr. J. Meacham, J P., into the circumstances attending the drowning of Lawrence Flood at the 14-mile, was continued on Thursday before Mr. A. B. Berg, P.M. The enquiry was ably conducted by Actg Sergt. Thomas Smith. The following is a precis of the evidence taken at both hearings .—

John Charles Smith, carrier, residing at Barcaldine, deposed that at about 9 a.m. on Friday, the 3rd inst, he was mustering some horses in Aramac lane, about three miles on the Barcaldine side of the Half way Hotel. He overtook a man riding a creamy mare; be had two bay packhorses and a chestnut foal, also a black sheep dog following him. About a fortnight previously he saw the same man at the Half Way Hotel lying on the verandah in the shade. On the 3rd he had a drink from the man's waterbag, aud they rode together for about half-a-mile; the man appeared to be suffering from the effects of drink. At about 1 p m. he saw the man sitting on the bank of Newark dam. He had about five minutes conversation with him. The man said to him, "Where is the best place for me to camp." Witness replied, "Outside the Newark paddock fence." Witness then rode away. When about 150 yards away he looked back and saw the man walking over by the wash close to the dam. He never saw him since; he did not know his name. The man was about 40 years of age, medium build, clean shaved except for moustache, and was dressed in ordinary workman's clothes,—trousers, shirt, hat, no coat. In his conversation with the man he said he had had a fall from his horse just before witness saw him, but he did not appear to be injured in any way.

Constable Henry James Houston deposed that on Thursday, the 9th. from instructions received he went to Newark tank on Mildura, about 12 miles from Barcaldine. He saw four horses hobbled out, and a black sheep dog tied up, a riding saddle and general camp outfit in the water in the by- wash, about 100 yards from Newark dam. He afterwards went over the bank of the dam and saw the dead body of a man floating in the water close to the bank. The body was face downwards; and the only clothing on the body was a blue cambric shirt. About 20 yards away was a billy and a pintpot, both filled with water. He then went to the Half-Way Hotel, and asked Leslie Hillcoat to accompany him to Newark dam to identify a body which he had found floating in the tank. Constable Scott was present when Hillcoat identified the body as that of Lawrence Flood. Hill coat stated that Flood had been drinking at the hotel for about a fortnight prior to the 3rd inst, on which day be left, going in the direction of Barcaldine, Hillcoat also identified the horses, dog and camp outfit as that which deceased had when at the hotel. There were no marks of violence on the body or any indications of foul play; the body was in an advanced stage of de composition, and had been in the water six or seven days. The body appeared to be that of a man between 40 and 60 years of age, fair hair and fair moustache turning grey. Between the 3rd and 9th inst. about five inches of rain had fallen, which accounted for the water in the by-wash. The banks of the dam where the body was found were steep and slippery. Constable Scott and he buried the body. Witness had since made careful enquiries in Barcaldine but failed to find any relatives belonging to deceased.

Richard Pascoe deposed that he was a carrier, residing at Barcaldine. He knew the deceased. Lawrence Flood, whom he saw on the 28th Dec., 1912, at the Half Way Hotel, Aramac road; he was camped there, and was drinking. Witness had several conversations with deceased, who said to him once,"Have you any family?" Witness replied, "Yes." Deceased then said, "I will make my horses over to them."Witness asked why, and deceased said, "I am going to die." He complained about a pain in the region of the heart, and he frequently complained of this pain. He had not seen the deceased since the 28th Dec. last. Deceased had told him he had no friends in this country; he did not mention about any relatives. Deceased said his name was Flood, but that he was called "Dublin Mick." He saw deceased riding a creamy horse. He heard a man answering to the description of deceased had been found in the 10-Mile dam. Deceased was well liked by everybody; he had no enemies to witness's knowledge.

John Graham Miller deposed he was a grazier, residing at Mildura. On Thurs day, 9th January, he was riding through his property, and when near Newark dam he saw four hobbled horses, and a dog was tied up under a tree. Flood waters had been all round the ground where the horses were. He saw parts of a riding saddle, packsaddle, and a tent, sticking up out of the water. The horses and dog appeared to have been there about three days. He did not see a sign of any person around. He rode about and had a good look round, and reported what he had seen to the Barcaldine police by telephone. In the afternoon of the same day be returned to the opposite side of the creek to where he had seen the horses, and looking in the dam saw the dead body of a man lying at the edge in about a foot of water; it was lying face downwards. There appeared to be only a shirt on the body; he did not touch it or examine it. He then rode home and reported the matter to the police by telephone. He saw a billycan on the creek about 20 or 30 yards from where the body was. The horses hobbled out were a creamy, two bays and a foal. He did not know the deceased.

Leslie Hillcoat deposed he was manager of the Half-Way Hotel, at the 20-Mile, Aramac road. He knew the deceased Lawrence Flood. He came to the Half Way Hotel about the 7th December, and remained there until the 3rd January last. On the latter date deceased saddled up and said he was going to Coreena. He saw him going away along the Barcaldine road; he was riding a creamy mare and leading one pack horse, whilst another pack horse was following him. Deceased had been drinking moderately during the time he was at the hotel, but be was sober when he left the hotel. On the 10th inst. witness went with Constable Houston to see the body of a man found in Newark dam, and he recognised it as that of Lawrence Flood; it was lying face downwards and had only a shirt on. He identified deceased's four horses, dog and packs. Deceased had complained to him of having a nagging pain in the chest, which, he thought, was a cancer, and stated be intended going to Rockhampton for treatment. Deceased was a very quiet man, and had had no quarrel with anyone to his knowledge. Deceased said he came from County Clare, Ireland, and that he had a sister married in Ireland, but he did not know her married name nor her address. He understood from deceased that he was a single man, and was about 50 years of age, dark complexion, turning grey, medium build, moustache turning gray, blue eyes, and two or three teeth missing in the front of his mouth. He knew the deceased for about two years.
Enquiry closed, and depositions forwarded in the usual way to the Crown Law offices, Brisbane.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Monday 27 January 1913 p 10 Article
The death occurred yesterday of Mrs. Susan M'Gann, an old resident of Maryborough, in her 74th year. The deceased lady was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in Australia 29 years ago, practically all of which time was spent in Maryborough. Her husband predeceased her in 1897, and she leaves three sons and four daughters-Messrs. Martin, Michael, and John M'Gann (all employed in the Hallway Department), and Mesdames G. Burgees (Maryborough), Maloney (Mount Morgan), Miss Delia M'Gann (Mount Morgan), and Nurse M'Gann (New Zealand).

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 12 March 1913 p 18 Article
A GOLDEN WEDDING.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael O'Loughlin of Wallaroo, celebrated their golden wedding last month. Mr. O'Loughlin was married to Miss Bridget Liddy in county Clare, on February l8, 1863, by the Rev. Father Barry, and they arrived in South Australia by the ship Rockliffe on December 20, 1864. They first settled in Kapunda, where they lived for seven years, and then removed to Wallaroo by coach. They have resided in the latter town ever since. There are four sons, namely, Mr. Patrick O'Loughlin, retired farmer; Mr. Peter O'Loughlin, clerk at the Wallaroo smelting works; Mr. John S. O'Loughlin, and Mr. Edward O'Loughlin. The daughters are Mrs. A. W. McGregor, Mrs. R. B. Hardman, Misses K. O'Loughlin, S. O'Loughlin; and I. O'Loughlin, of Sydney. There was a large gathering of relatives and friends, and many useful and valuable presents were received.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 21 March 1913 p 8 Family Notices
O'LOUGHLIN.-On the 13th March, at Letcher-street, Kadina, Bridget, dearly beloved wife of John O'Loughlin, and second daughter of the late Patrick and Margaret Collins, of Kilmaly, County Clare, Ireland, aged 57 years, leaving six daughters and three sons to mourn their sad loss, R.I.P.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 22 March 1913 p 14 Family Notices
BOURKE:- March 19 at her daughter's residence, Kinaird, Beach road, Darling Point, Sydney, Catherine Agnes (Kate), relict of the late James Bourke, of Castlereagh street, Sydney, and county Clare, Ireland eldest daughter of the late Peter and Mary Power, of Elfin, Roscommon, Ireland, and niece of the late James Plunkett, of Kinaird, Roscommon Ireland, aged 82 years. R.I.P. Queensland papers please copy.

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954) Tuesday 25 March 1913 p 4 Article
FATAL RESULT OF A FIRE.
DEATH OF MR. JOHN CASEY.
A MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY.
VERDICT OF ACCIDENTAL DEATH
M. C.F. Butler, S.M., Coroner, held a magisterial inquiry at the Courthouse yesterday morning into the cause of the death of John Casey, who died on Saturday afternoon from the result of injuries received in a fire at his house in Chapple-street on March 12.

Dr. Macgillivray deposed that he was called in to attend the deceased just after a fire that had occurred at the deceased's house in Chapple-street on the 12th instant; he saw the deceased on March 13 at Mr. Smith's house in Sulphide-street; deceased was suffering from severe burns to both hands, face, and right leg; the injuries caused him great suffering, and he never really recovered from the shock, and died, on Saturday, March 22; the cause of death was shock and exhaustion acting upon an old man; he was over 70 years of age.

Mary Elizabeth Casey, widow of the deceased, stated that on the afternoon of the 12th instant her house was burned down; when it caught alight Mary Crase and witness were in the house, and deceased was out in the yard; deceased opened up the front door, came into the house, and tried to get into the room; witness heard a crash, which must have been caused by a jug and basin falling; witness ran up the passage and saw the flames, and then she screamed; the next witness saw of her husband was when he was taken to Mr. Smith's house; he was then badly burned about the face, hands, and the right leg; deceased told witness that he was trying to save his best clothes; he was 72 years of age, and was very deaf; he was born in County Clare, Ireland.

Florence May Crase, spinster, gave evidence in corroboration of the previous witness; she did not know how the five occurred; it was a very windy and dusty day, and she was ironing in the house at the time with a box iron.

Patrick Joseph Smith, miner, stated that on March 12 he was going to his home in Sulphide-street, when Miss Crase told, him that the house was on fire, meaning Mr. Casey's, house; he rushed over and met Mrs. Casey halfway over coming for him when witness got there he rushed in by the back door, and found the deceased in the middle of the room with the place all aflame; witness took deceased out of the house; his clothes were all alight, and witness pulled deceased's coat and vest off; the knees of his trousers were alight and witness put the flames out with his hand; two women came across and took deceased to witness's place, where he remained till he died; witness asked deceased what he was doing in there and why he didn't get out, and he replied that he was trying to get his clothes. The Coroner found that the deceased died from the effects of burns accidentally received on March 12.

Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle (Vic. : 1882 - 1918) Tuesday 8 April 1913 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Article
Death of Judge Casey. Judge Casey died at his residence, St. Kilda, early on Saturday morning, aged 82 years. The deceased gentleman was born at Tromroe, county Clare, and arrived in Victoria in 1855. After being proprietor of two news papers, he was elected M.L.A. for Sandhurst in 1861. He held office as Minister of Justice, Attorney-General and Minister of Lands. In 1865 he was called to the bar, and from 1884 to 1900 he was a County Court judge. As a politician he showed more than average independence and as a judge he discharged his duty with ability and fearlessness.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 12 April 1913 p 13 Family Notices
QUILLIGAN. - On the 9th April, at his residence, No. 122 Arden-street, North Melbourne, John, loving father of Mary, Lizzie, and Alice Quilligan, and brother of Matthew and Thomas Quilligan, native of County Clare, Ireland. (Interred privately, Melbourne General Cemetery, 11th inst.) Requiescat in pace.

The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) Tuesday 29 April 1913 p 5 Article
Mrs. Lucy Mary Neale, relict of the late Mr. J. H. Neale, who died at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. George Donehue, of Hope Farm, near.Narracoorte at the age of 84, was born at the Six-mile Bridge, County, Clare, Ire land.

Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 15 May 1913 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Article
Mr. Michael O'Donohue, an old and respected resident of Killeran, in the western district, died on the 5th instant. He was 70 years of age and father of Mr. M. J. O'Donohue, proprietor of the "Seymour Express", who, with other members of the bereaved family, has the sincere sympathy of many friends. Deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and a respected colonist of 47 years standing.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 20 May 1913 p 6 Article
On Friday, May 10, Mrs. Margaret Bathern, widow of the late Mr. Clause Bathern and daughter of the late Mr. Owen Murray, of Lisdoonvoarna, County Clare, Ireland, died at Stone Hut, at the age of 75 years. She was a colonist of 60 years. The deceased has left four sons (Messrs. H. M., W. J. and P.T. Bathern, of Northern Territory, and F. C. Bathern, of Wagin, W.A.), and four daughters (Mesdames M. Lynch, of Stone Hut; T. J. Cockburn, Wirrabara; and E. Jennings, Perth, W.A.; and Miss M. Bathern, Stone Hut).

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 22 May 1913 p 1 Family Notices
KELLY. —On the 21st May, at his residence, Nelson-street, Euroa, Thomas loving husband of the late Anne Kelly, and brother of Patrick Kelly, of Kilmore, R.I.P.

KELLY. —On the 21st May, at his residence, Nelson-street, Euroa, Thomas Kelly, Native County Clare, Ireland, late of Tamleugh, aged 77 years. A colonist for 53 years. Rest in peace.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 24 May 1913 p 13 Family Notices
O'DONOHUE - On the 22nd May, at his residence, the Darling Hotel, corner of Lennox and Elizabeth Streets, North Richmond, Andrew Joseph, dearly beloved husband of Amanda O'Donohue, and loving father of Angela O'Donohue also son in law of William & Margaret O'Brien, of Mcpheron St, Carlton, and brother in law of Mr J Harris, of 715 Drummond St, North Carlton, aged 45 years. A native of County Clare, Ireland. Home papers please copy.

O'DONOHUE - On the 22nd May, at his residence Darling Hotel, Richmond, Andrew Joseph, loving Father of Angela, & youngest son of Briget O'Donohue and the late James O'Donoghue, a native of Co. Clare, Ireland. RIP (lnserted by his loving daughter Babs.).

Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 29 May 1913 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article
OBITUARY. Mr. Thomas Kelly who died at Euroa on the 20th instant was for some time a settler at Tamleugh, where he had a handsome property. The deceased gentleman was 77 years of age, and came to this state when a young man of 24. He was a brother of Mr. Patrick Kelly, a well-known and much-respected Kilmore resident, who has just let his property to reside at Tamleugh and Euroa. The late Mr. Kelly was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and his remains were interred in the Kilmore Catholic Cemetery on Thursday last, Mr. J. Beegan having charge of the funeral arrangements here. Father Power read the burial service.

The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 31 May 1913 p 37 Article
PASSING OF THE PIONEERS.
There passed away at Miles on Monday evening (writes our Miles correspondent) one of the oldest persons in Queensland, and certainly one of the most interesting and remarkable, in the person of Mrs. Bridget Fogarty. Mrs. Fogarty was 98 years old or more when she died. She came to Queensland from County Clare, Ireland, with her husband, Mr. John Fogarty, 60 years ago. Most of her life in Queensland was passed on the Downs. She lived for many years at Dalby, before coming to Miles 20 years ago, and her husband died at Dalby. Latterly she had lived with her daughter in-law (Mrs. M. J. Fogarty) and, although she had reached such an advanced age, maintained a cheerful disposition, and was always thoughtful for others. Her health was remarkably well preserved. It was only recently that she commenced to wear spectacles, and till a recent date she possessed all her teeth. Up to two years ago she was a great reader of novels and general literature, and was in full possession of all her faculties up to the time of her death. Mrs. Fogarty leaves two married daughters—Mrs. Falconer, who lived in the same house with her, and Mrs. Butler; of Mount Ferry district—and a son, Mr. W. Fogarty, of Miles. The funeral, which was largely attended, took place in the old Miles cemetery on Tuesday, when the Rev. Father O'Keefe performed the last rites.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 20 June 1913 p 8 Article
The death occurred at the Adelaide Hospital on Tuesday of Mr. Terrence McGann at the age of 64 years. Mr. McGann was born in county Clare, Ireland, and arrived in South Australia 25 years ago. He was long considered, the most expert outdoor photographer in Adelaide, and many beautiful pictures came from his camera. It was he who took the photographs of the members of the Federal Convention and the journalists who were engaged thereat in Adelaide in April, 1897 and he did similar work in connection with many other historic gatherings. His work was always artistic, and he took a deep pride in it. Many of his best pictures appeared in "The Chronicle."

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Tuesday 24 June 1913 p 1 Family Notices
ARMSTRONG. -On the 21st June at St. Kilda, Ellen Sarah, fourth daughter of the late John Armstrong, Dean of Kilfenora, County Clare, Ireland, aged 73. (interred privately.)

The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Tuesday 1 July 1913 p 10 Family Notices
The funeral of the late Mrs. Margaret Patterson, relict of the late Mr. William Patterson, took place yesterday morning, and was largely attended. The deceased, who was 70 years of age; was born at County Clare, Ireland, and had resided in this State for upwards of 40 years. She leaves a grown-up family of three sons and four daughters, and a large number of grand-children. The cortege moved from the residence of her son, Mr. W. Patterson, 19 Howard-street, Leederville, and proceeded to the Roman Catholic Cemetery at Karrakatta where the remains were laid to rest, the Rev. Father O'Gorman conducting the burial rites. The chief mourners were Messrs. Michael, John, and William Patter son (sons), Mrs. N. Mullane, Mrs. T. Mayes, Mrs. WV. Pinker, and Miss M. Patterson (daughters), Mrs. S. Patterson (daughter-in law), Messrs. J. Mullane and W. Pinker (sons-in-law), Messrs. William, John, Cecil, and Norman Mullane, M. Patterson, P. and C. Mayes (grandsons), Mrs. W. Adlam, Mrs. Appleton, Miss M. Patterson, and Miss E. Mayes (grand-daughters). The pall-bearers were Messrs. H. Maher, A. Boyle, W. Adams, J. T. Mills, C. H. Butler, and J. Mullaney. Many wreaths and floral tributes were received. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Thursday 3 July 1913 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 5 Article
AN AEROPLANE FATALITY
STRANGE DISCLOSURE UNAUTHORISED REPAIR. LONDON, July 2.

In the House of Commons to-day, in answer to a question, Colonel J. E. B. Seely (Secretary of State for War) stated that he admitted that Lieutenant D. Arthur's death on May 27, whilst aeroplaning, was due to his machine having been secretly and un- authoritatively repaired by some un known person. The repair was concealed by the covering fabric. [Lieutenant Desmond L. Arthur, of the Second Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps, was killed near the aerodrome at Montrose about eight o'clock on the morning of May 27, by falling in a biplane from a height of. 2,000ft. Lieutenant Arthur was flying in fair weather a mile from the aerodrome when one of the planes was seen to collapse and the machine fell like a stone into a field. The pilot was found in an adjoining field a hundred feet away. Death was instant, his neck being broken. The aeroplane was the Government-built machine, B E 295, flown from Farnborough to Montrose by Major Burke a week previously Lieutenant Arthur, who was only 29, was born at O'Brien's Bridge, County Clare, and educated at Portora Royal School, Inniskilling. He belonged to the 5th Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers (Special Reserve), being gazetteer on May 27, 1911; before, that he had been lieutenant in the Army Motor Reserve. He joined the second squadron of the military wing of the Royal Flying Corps on April 17 last, and went to Montrose about two months ago.]

Warwick Examiner and Times (St. Lucia, Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Saturday 12 July 1913 p 4 Article
We regret to chronicle the demise of Mr. James Russell, which sad event took place at his residence in Pratten-street about 4 o'clock yesterday morning. Deceased, who was aged 65 years, was born in County Clare, Ireland, and for some years was engaged in the baking trade in Dublin. Arriving in Queensland 20 years ago, for a considerable period he followed the occupation of a shearer's cook, and was engaged at many of the big sheds in South Queensland. About seven years ago he was employed by the Warwick Town Council as Town Hall keeper and was very assiduous in the performance of his duties. About four months ago he tendered his resignation owing to continued ill-health but the restful life in the evening of his days was not to be deceased's portion. For the past nine weeks the late Mr. Russell had been laid up, and death was due to general break-up. He was very honest and straightforward in all his dealings, and was generally respected. He leaves a widow and one daughter (Mrs. James Marshall, of Warwick) to mourn their loss. The funeral will take place at 2.30 this afternoon, and the aldermen and officers of the Town Council will be represented in the cortege.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 17 July 1913 p 8 Article
Mr. Michael Conolan died in his sleep at his residence, Adelaide-road, Kapunda, on Monday night. He was born in County Clare in 1845, and came to this State with his parents in 1854. As a lad he worked in the old Kapunda copper mine for a time, afterwards farming with his parents, and, later, on his own account. He was one of the early members of the Belvidere District Council, of which he was chair- man for a term. Mr. Conolan took a great interest in politics, and was a good worker for the Agricultural Society and the Hibernian Society. He used to express the opinion that to die in his sleep was ideal, and he had his wish. He was unmarried, and left a brother, Murtagh, and sister, Mrs. O'Callahan.,both residents of Kapunda.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 17 July 1913 p 10 Article
KAPUNDA, July 16.—Mr. Michael Conolan. aged 65, was found dead in his bed on Monday morning. He retired apparently in his ordinary health on Sunday night, and had not shown any signs of illness. A native of County Clare, Ireland, he had been a resident of this district since 1854, in which year he came to South Australia with his parents in the ship Time and Truth. For a while he worked at the copper mine, but subsequently went in for farming. He was for years a member of the Belvidera District Council, and had a term as Chairman. He also was a good worker for the Agricultural Society, and took a keen interest in politics. He was never married. He lived with his brother (Mr. Murtagh Conolan), who also was a bachelor.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 29 July 1913 p 8 Family Notices
HOGAN.-On the 20th July, at the Adelaide Hospital, Timothy, the beloved husband of Ellen Hogan, of Donegal street, Norwood, aged 87 years.-- R.I.P. A native of County Clare, Ireland. Colonist of 59 years.

The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Thursday 7 August 1913 p 10 Family Notices
The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary Rouse (relict of the late Mr. Henry Rouse, of H.M. 99th Regiment), of 10 Turner-street, East Perth, took place on the 3rd inst., and was largely attended. The deceased, who was 79 years of age, was born in County Clare, Ireland, and married in Hong Kong, China, where she resided for five years. She lived in South Australia seven years, Tasmania eight years, and in this State for the past 31 years, and leaves a grown-up family of two daughters and two sons. The cortege moved from the residence of her daughter, Mrs. F. W. Laffer, 10 Turner-street, East Perth, and proceeded by road to the Roman Catholic Cemetery, Karrakatta, where the remains were interred. The chief mourners were Mesdames F. W. Laffer and P. Broadhurst (daughters), Masters Harold Laffer and T. Broadhurst (grandsons), Mr. P. Broadhurst (son-in-law), Mesdames Pead, Dalton, Gawthorne, Haslemore, Hawley, Murtagh, and Egan, and Miss Murtagh. The pall- bearers were Messrs. W. H. Laffer, A. S. Haslemore, E. E. Broadhurst, and D. Gawthorne. Numerous wreaths, floral tributes, and messages of sympathy were received. The Rev. Father T. Masterton conducted the burial service. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. C. H. Smith and Co.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 15 August 1913 p 7 Article
A GOLDEN WEDDING.
The Golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. John O'Dea was celebrated at their home, ''Clare Villa", Hamley Bridge, recently, when there was a family reunion. Mr. O'Dea arrived in South Australia with his parents in the ship Time and Truth in May, 1854, from County Clare, Ireland, at the age of 10. He travelled from Port Adelaide to Bagot Station, near Kapunda, by bullock-dray. The family settled there for about eight years and at intervals with other pioneers he carted copper from Burra to Port Adelaide. He can relate many thrilling tales of those early days when hardships were numerous. Mrs. O'Dea (at that time Miss Crowley) arrived in Melbourne, with her sister in December, 1862, at the age of 21 years, having also come from County Clare. They came to Port Adelaide a week later, where they were met by their brothers, of Bogot's Gap. The couple were married at the old church of St. John's, Kapunda, by the late Father Ryan, the following August, and took up their residence in Pinkerton Plains, where Mr. O'Dea had then taken up land within two miles of their present home. Mrs. O'Dea, with other lady settlers used to walk to Stockport for provisions, a distance of eight miles. The couple have seen Hamley Bridge grow from its wild state to its present prosperous condition. Both are still hale and hearty. There are two sons -Messrs. P. J. and M. J. O'Dea, of Ngallo, Victoria and three daughters Mrs. C. Kain, and Misses M. I. and H. T. O'Dea (of Hamley Bridge) and 11 grandchildren.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 15 August 1913 p 8 Family Notices
GOLDEN WEDDING.
O'DEA - CROWLEY .-On the 8th August. 1863. at St John's Church, Kapunda, by the Rev. Father Ryan, John, youngest son of the late Patrick O'Dea, of Bagot's Station, to Maria, eldest daughter of the late Patrick Crowley, County Clare, Ireland.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 27 August 1913 p 14 Family Notices
GOLDEN WEDDING.
SEXTON—DUNDON. —On the 25th July, 1863 at St. John's Church, Kapunda, by the Rev. Micheal Ryan, Michael, fourth son of the late Daniel Sexton, of County Clare, Ireland, to Mary, eldest daughter of the late Micheal Dundon, of Kapunda. Present address —Wilson.

The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Monday 1 September 1913 p 9 Family Notices
The funeral of the late Mr. John Hehir, of 251 Beaufort-street, took place on Friday afternoon, and was attended by many relatives and friends. The deceased, who was 43 years of age, was born at County Clare, Ireland, and had resided in this State for 15 years. The cortege moved from the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, where the first portion of, the funeral service was performed by the Rev. Father Molloney, and thence to the Roman Catholic Cemetery at Karrakatta, where the remains were interred, the Rev. Father McCabe conducting the burial rites. The chief mourners were Mrs. J. Moir and Mrs. C. Sullivan (sisters), Mr J. Moir and Mr. C. Sullivan (brothers-in-law), Masters Jack and Con. Sullivan, Jack and Bernard Hardwick (nephews). Miss Mary Hardwick (niece), Mrs. J. Frawley (aunt), and Miss M. Frawley (cousin). The pall-bearers were Messrs. James Hardwick, John Hardwick, E. W. Taylor, F. Walker, T. Dwyer, and G. Boyle. There were no flowers (by request), but a large number of letters and telegrams of condolence were received by the family. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea. [Son of Andrew Hehir and Hannah Lawler. – moh]

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 10 September 1913 p 1 Family Notices
O'NEILL. -On the 7th September, at the Austin Hospital, Ellen (Elsie) O'Neill, late of Domain street, South Yarra, and formerly of Horsely, Bacchus Marsh, daughter of the late John O'Neill, of Derrybrick, County Clare, Ireland. (Privately interred Heidelberg Cemetery,) Requiescat in pace.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 13 September 1913 p 16 Article
Sister Martina, who died at St. Joseph's Convent, Brompton, on Thursday, was a member of that order for about 44 years, 18 of which she spent in the Brompton district. She was closely devoted to her calling, and her demise is a distinct loss to the order, and the Brompton Convent in particular. The deceased, whose family name was Bunfield, was born in Lisdoonvana, County Clare, Ireland. Soon after arrival in South Australia she joined the sisterhood, and was stationed at Gawler, Wallaroo, and other country centres. Office and requiem mass for the repose of her soul were celebrated in St. Saviour's Church, Brompton, on Friday morning. The Rev. Father Candler, O.P., officiated, and among the large gathering were the Sister Superior of the Order (Sister Victor, of Kensington), Very Rev. Prior Spence, O.P., Rev. Prior Powar. O.C.C., Rev. Father O'Byrne, O.P., Fencher, O.C.C., O'Dowling, S.J., Gwynne, S.J., Lee, M.H.S., Hourigan, Delehanty, and Smith. [Bridget Bunfield born 3 August 1844 (no parents listed) entered convent 30 January 1869, died 11 September 1911 at Adelaide, South Australia. - moh]

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 13 September 1913 p 16 Article
The death is announced of Mrs. Mariner, of Clarendon, at the age of 77 years. She was born in County Ennis, Ireland, in 1836, and was married to Mr. Austin Mariner in 1856. Two years later they sailed in the barque Bee for South Australia. They settled at Happy Valley, but soon moved to Clarendon, where 45 years were passed. The widower and the following children survive— .Mesdames Clarke (Woodchester) Stubbins (London), Phillips (North Adelaide), Davis (Melbourne), Excell (Henley Beach), Stone (Glenelg), and. Conlon (Clarendon), Mr. John Mariner (Glen Osmond), and Mr. James Mariner, (Netley Station, New South Wales).

Wodonga and Towong Sentinel (Vic. : 1885 - 1954) Friday 19 September 1913 p 2 Article
Mrs. Frederick Blood died at Ormond, in the Moorabool district, Victoria, on Sunday, at the age of 107 years, from bronchitis. Deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and had lived in Victoria for nearly 50 years, having excellent health until a few weeks before her death.

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Thursday 25 September 1913 p 2 Article
The interment of the remains of the late Mrs Susan Denny, of Coburg, and relict of the late Mr Alexander Denny, formerly of Mortlake, took place at the Mortlake Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon in the presence of a number of mourners and friends. Deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1833, and was therefore 80 years of age. Her husband, who died 43 years ago, carried on farming pursuits, and was one of the early pioneers of the Western District.

The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Saturday 11 October 1913 p 8 Article
LORD DUNBOYNE DEAD. HIS QUAINT DUTIES AS FORMER KINGS REMEMBRANCER. After lying ill for some time at his Irish residence, Knoppogue Castle, Quin, County Clare, Lord Dunboyne died recently at the age of seventy. He succeeded to the title in 1899, and was an Irish representative peer. Lord Dunboyne's death revies memories of the peculiar duties attached to the office of King's Remembrancer, which he held for four years. He was the recipient every year of a number of horse shoe nails from the tenants in St. Clement Dane's, London. Their tenement was known as "The Forge." On the occasion of every anniversary of Blenheim and Waterloo he received from the Dukes of Wellington and Marlborough, flag as quit-rent for Blenheim and Strathfieldsaye, these being the terms on which the estates were originally granted. As King's Remembrancer Lord Dunboyne also demanded, on behalf of his Majesty, two small faggots and a hatchet and billhook in payment for an estate in the County of Salop.

The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 11 October 1913 p 2 Family Notices
O'Connor.--On 6th October, at Mount Blackwood, Honora, relict of the late Maurice O'Connor, loving mother of Joseph, John, and Maurice, aged 70 years. A colonist of 50 years. Native of Ennis, County Clare, Ireland.

The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954) Wednesday 29 October 1913 p 3 Article
"CURE" NOT AUTHENTICATED.
The heroine of Lourdes is Miss Grace Maloney, aged eighteen, of the diocese of Killaloe. County Clare. For nine years she has suffered from tuberculosis of the right knee-joint with complete stiffness. Eight operations brought no relief, and after nine month in bed the knee was still swollen and painful. When walking she had a decided limp.
Struggling along in the procession Miss Maloney told a group of doctors and priests; "I felt a sudden pain climbing up my leg as I approached the shrine. When the pain reached the knee the stiffness suddenly passed off. I straightened my leg for the first time for many years and I walked without limping."
On examination the joint was still found to be somewhat swollen and doughy, but really movable and pain less. Unfortunately the case is not yet accepted as authentic by the local authorities because the patient was not examined by the Lourdes Medical Board before visiting the shrine.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 12 November 1913 p 11 Article
GORDON. — Mr. John Burke, farmer, died on Tuesday at the age of 73 years. He was 47 years in Victoria, and came from County Clare, Ireland.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Wednesday 19 November 1913 p 3 Article
I regret to report the death of Mr. T. Crowe, one of our earliest settlers. He died in the Thyne Memorial Hospital on Sunday afternoon. He was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and was born in 1839. He came to South Australia in 1864, landing at Port Adelaide. For some time he worked in the Clare and Kapunda districts. From there he went to Victoria, and took up land where Horsham is now. He sold his interest in the property, and came to the South East, and for some time worked around Mount Gambier in connection with Messrs. Donlon and M. Whelan. Leaving the Mount district he came to the Millicent district, and worked on the drains. Subsequently taking up land, he occupied it till the time of his death. He took no active part in public matters. He succeeded well as a pioneer, and was well liked by a large circle of friends. He leaves a widow, five sons, and three daughters. The family reside at Nangula. The funeral will be held to-day in the Mayurra cemetery.

The North Eastern Ensign (Benalla, VIC. : 1872 - 1938) Friday 28 November 1913 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article
Mrs Hanora, relict of the late William Elliott, brickmaker, Benalla, died at her residence, Carrier-street, on the 20th Inst. Deceased had attained the ripe age of 81 years. She was a native of Kilkisham, County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in Melbourne when 18 years old. Some time afterwards she married her late husband, both settling in Benalla about 60 years ago. Deceased was the mother of a family of 9, three of whom, however, died, five males and one female being still alive. The late Mrs. Elliott was a good mother, a faithful wife, being regarded by her neighbors and acquaintances as a kind-hearted God-fearing woman. She was therefore widely and deservedly respected. Her remains were interred in the local cemetery on Saturday, The Rev. Father Armstrong reading the burial service.

The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954) Tuesday 2 December 1913 p 7 Article
"Irish Life," dated October 3rd, gives the account of a wedding which aroused considerable interest in military circles in Ulster, that of Miss Kathleen Mary Shine, elder daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel Shine, R.A.M.C. of Glandore Park, Antrim Road, to Captain Edmund Roche Kelly, son of Mr. M. Roche Kelly, of Fire Grove, county Clare. The bride, who was given away by her father, looked very pretty in a white charmeuse gown, veiled in crepe ninon embroidered in pearls. Her veil of French applique was held in place by a wreath of real orange blossoms and myrtle. Her ornaments were diamond earrings, the gift of the bride-groom, and a diamond and pearl pendant, the gift of the bridegroom's father. The three bridesmaids, Miss Lilian Shine (sister of the bride), and the Misses Kathleen and Rosalie Roche Kelly (the bridegroom's sisters), wore pale blue ninon over white spotted net, and black picture hats. They carried bouquets of carnations, and on each of their gold bracelets, which were gifts from the bridegroom, was the badge of his regiment. Lieutenant J. R. Kelly, South Irish Horse, acted as best man. After the service a reception was held. The wedding presents included a silver rose bowl from the officers, R.A.M.C. (Belfast district); silver salver, officers Royal Irish Rifles Depot; silver cigarette box, officers 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Regiment, and a silver photo frame from Sergeant-Major, Non-Commissioned Officers and men R.A.M.C. The honeymoon was spent in England; the bride's travelling costume was carried out in grey, the hat trimmed with rose colored feathers. (The bride is a neice of Mrs. Forrest and Mrs. Huxtable of this town).

Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 - 1954) Sunday 4 January 1914 p 9 Article
ALMOST A CENTENARIAN
Died in Perth on Tuesday morning, in his hundredth year, Mr. Michael McEvoy, father of Mr. M. M'Evoy, of Sayers and M'Evoy. and of six other residents of this State. A native of County Clare, Ireland, he came to Victoria 60 years ago, and was a resident of the West for 19 years.

Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916) Tuesday 6 January 1914 p 14 Article
Mr. M. McEvoy died suddenly last week at the residence of his son, Mr. M. McEvoy, in Kirkham Hill, Maylands. The deceased was in his hundredth year. He was a native of County Clare, came to Victoria about 60 years ago, and was a resident of W.A. for nearly 19 years. Despite his advanced age, he enjoyed fairly good health, and was tenderly cared for. Deceased leaves a family of seven--two sons, Mr. M. McEvoy, of Sayers and McEvoy's Furniture Emporium,William-street, and J. McEvoy, of Boulder. The five daughters are Mrs. Sayers, of Subiaco; Mrs. Bradshaw, and the three Misses McEvoy, of Coolgardie.

The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954) Tuesday 13 January 1914 p 3 Article
On Saturday morning last Mackay lost another of its early pioneers in the person of John Temple, of Eton, who died at a private hospital in town after a short illness. The late Mr Temple was a cheery old gentleman, hailing from County Clare, and arrived In Mackay about 40 years ago. For about 20 years be was carrying to Peak Downs and other outlying stations, and then took up selections in the Eton district, where he was canegrowing till
the time of his death. Deceased was 76 years of age, and leaves a widow and three sons to mourn their loss.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Saturday 17 January 1914 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 6 Article
CORNELIUS HOGAN, native of Tulla, County Clare, Ireland, age about 50 years, height about 5ft. 7in., weight about 1601b.; last heard of at Mt. Morgans, about 1904.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 5 February 1914 p 1 Family Notices
BOLTON -On the 4th February at his residence Glenlyon, Patrick Bolton beloved father of Michael, James, Patrick, John, Frank, Mrs. Egan, Mrs Twomey, Mrs. Keogh and Maggie, aged 88 years. A native of County Clare Ireland and a colonist of 61 years. R.I.P.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Tuesday 10 February 1914 p 1 Family Notices
DOHERTY. —On the 9th February, at his residence, "Genazzano," Elgin street, Hawthorn, Thomas (ex-sergeant of police), husband of the late Ellen Doherty, and beloved father of Elizabeth, Thomas, John, and the late Sister M. Campion, a native of County Clare, Ireland, aged 71 years. By request, no flowers. Requiescat in pace.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 28 February 1914 p 6 Article
The marriage of M. J. Scanlan, of Broome (W.A.), son of the late Mr. Patrlck Scanlan and Mrs. Scanlan, of County Clare, Ireland, and Margaret Maria Cahill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Cahill, of Lavender Bay, took place on February 24, and was quietly solemnised by the Rev. Father Tighe, S.J., assisted by the Rev. Father Corish, S.J., at St. Francis Xavier's Church, Lavender Bay. The bride was given away by her father, and wore a trained gown of ivory crepe de Chine over ivory satin charmeuse, arranged with ivory shadow lace and pearls. Her hat was of ivory brocaded satin, finished with a feather mount, and she carried a shower bouquet, a gift from the bridegroom, who also presented her with a diamond and pearl pendant. Miss Mollie Cahill (sister of the bride) acted as bridesmaid, and wore ivory chiffon voile over shell-pink satin, with a broad sash of pink, and a black velvet hat ornamented with violet and white mounts. She carried a shower bouquet, and wore a gold watch wristlet, the gifts of the bridegroom. Mr. John O'Brien acted as best man. Miss Kathleen Cahill presided at the organ. A reception was after- wards held at Baumann's Cafe, Pitt-street, by the mother of the bride, after which the bride and bridegroom left for Katoomba and Jenolan Caves, prior to their departure for Europe. The bride's travelling dress was a powder-blue crepe de Chine, and her hat was of white satin, with white feathers.

Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954) Wednesday 4 March 1914 p 2 Article
NEWS OF THE WORLD
WORTH MORE THAN CARUSO.
J. T. O'Neil of Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, arrived in New York recently by the White Star Liner Celtic with a brown Irish skylark in a bulkheaded cage that held also a linnet and a bullfinch. The bullfinch has been trained to whistle a few bars of "The Wearing of the Green." but that does not make him so precious in the eyes and to the ears of O'Neil as the little skylark. "The English skylark ceases to be a warbler when he is brought to America." he said: "but I believe my bird will sing as cheerily as when floating through his native skies. I would not sell him for any amount of money; I would not sell a single note of him for a hundred-dollar bill. I brought him here for my own delight and that of my friends, who have never heard the sweet melody of the Irish skylark since they left Ireland."

Euroa Advertiser (Vic. : 1884 - 1920) Friday 13 March 1914 p 4 Article
Death of Rev. Father Smith. - The death occurred at mid-day-on Saturday at Chiltern, of Rev. Father Smith, parish priest. He had been suffering from appendicitis for over 12 months, and death was due to gastritis, after four days of suffering. years of age and a native of Ennis, The Rev. Father Smith, who was 45 County Clare, came to Australia about twenty years ago, his first mission being at Wangaratta. From Wangaratta, he was transferred to Pyramid Hill, and, four years ago, was appointed parish priest at Chiltern. He was a popular priest in this district, his very genial and jovial manner making him a favorite, and he was respected by everyone who knew him. On Monday morning at 10 o'clock, Office and Mass for the Dead were celebrated at St. Mary's Chiltern. Father Lawless, Chiltern, was the celebrant; deacon Father A Armstrong; sub-deacon, Father Doyle, Beechworth, Master of Ceremonies, Father Duggan, Wangaratta, chanters, Dr. Flynn, Wodonga, and Father Kennedy, Yarrawonga. Other clergy present were :--Rev. Father Hogan, Shepparton, Tobin, Euroa, Madden, Yarrawonga, O'Reilly, Benalla, Byrne, Wangaratta, ,Mohony, Myrtleford, Dean Gaffey, Beechworth, Cussen. C.S.S.R., Slattery aud Shannon, Albury, Hickey, Corowa, Clarke, Ganmain, Ryan, Balldale. The remains were interred in the Chiltern cemetery the burial service being read by Rev. Father Madden.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 14 March 1914 p 20 Family Notices
SCANLAN--CAHILL.-February 24, 1914, at St. Francis Xavier's Church, Lavender Bay, by the Rev. Father Tighe, S.J., assisted by the Rev. Father Corish, S.J., Michael Joseph, son of the late Mr. P. Scanlan and Mrs. Scanlan, County Clare, Ireland, to Margaret Maria, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cahill, Lavender Bay.

The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) Friday 20 March 1914 p 5 Article
A very old and highly esteemed resident of the Minyip district in the person of Mrs. J. O'Callaghan has passed away after a long illness. The deceased lady, who was 6o years of age was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Victoria 43 years ago. The service at the graveside was conducted by the Rev. Father Gleeson.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 28 March 1914 p 19 Article
WILL OF THOS. CONWAY, DECEASED. EXECUTORS ASK FOR DIRECTIONS.
This was an originating summons instituted by Patrick Sheahan, produce merchant ; and Matthew Collins, contractor (both of Marrickville), executors and trustees of the will of the late Thomas Conway, of Sans Souci, for the determination of the Court of certain questions arising under the will.
Mr. S A., Thompson, Instructed by Mr. F. H. Cowper, appeared for plaintiffs; Mr. Wickham, instructed by Mr. F. R. Cowper, for the defendants, Thomas Patrick Conway and Martin John Conway, of Sans Souci, sons of the testator; Mr. Bethune, instructed by Mr. F. R. Cowper, for the defendant, Ellen Pearl Conway, wife of Thomas Patrick Conway, and their children; and Mr. P. H. Rogers, instructed by Mr. Everard Digby, for the other defendants, Patrick Conway, John Conway, and James Conway (brothers of the testator), and Susan Kelly (sister of testator), of County Clare, Ireland.
The questions the Court was asked, among others, to determine were: Whether the expression "All my properties, wherever situated," applied only to testator's real estate? And whether the expression, "Any cash" which I may be possessed of at my death In my house, or on my person, or in my bank," included testator's share of the moneys In the Savings Bank, forming part of the estate of his wife, who died lntestate.
His Honor held that the expression "All my properties, wherever situated," Included testator's real and personal estate. Argument respecting the expression "any cash, etc.," had not concluded when the Court rose.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 31 March 1914 p 6 Article
WILL OF THOS. CONWAY, DECEASED. EXECUTORS ASK FOR DIRECTIONS.

The hearing was continued of the originating summons instituted by Patrick Sheahan, produce merchant, and Matthew Collins, contractor (both of Marrickville), executors and trustees of the will of the late Thomas Conway, of Sans Souci, for the determination of certain questions arising out of the will of the deceased.
Mr. S. A. Thompson, Instructed by Mr. F. R. Cowper, appeared for plaintiffs Mr. Wickham, instructed by Mr. F. R. Cowper, for the defendants. Thomas Patrick Conway and Martin John Conway, of Sans. Souci, sons of the deceased; Mr. Bethune, instructed by Mr. F. R. Cowper, for the defendant Ellen Pearl Conway, wife of Thomas Patrick Conway, and their children; and Mr. P.H. Rogers, instructed by Mr. Everard Digby, for the other defendants, Patrick, John, and James Conway (brothers of the testator), and Susan Kelly (sister of testator), of County Clare, Ireland.
The questions the Court was asked, among others, to determine were:-Whether the expression "all my properties wherever situated" applied only to testator's real estate? and whether the expression "any cash which I may be possessed of at my death in my house, or on my person, or In my bank" included testators, share of the moneys in the Savings Bank, forming part of the estate of his wife, who had, died intestate.
His Honor held that the expression, "all my properties wherever situated" Included testator's real and personal estate. As to the expression, "any cash, etc.," his Honor held that as £200 of the £299 cash was held by testator as trustee of his wife's estate that would not pass under the gift to the Irish legatees. The word "cash," said his Honor, as used by testator, must be taken to include only money that he could faithfully dispose of.
(Before Mr. Justice Harvey.)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Tuesday 14 April 1914 p 9 Article
PENSHURST. — Mr. George Green dropped dead while speaking to friends on Sunday. He was 60 years of age, and a native of County Clare, Ireland. He had been employed for the past 30 years by the Mount Rouse Shire Council.

The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) Friday 17 April 1914 p 5 Article
An old and respected resident in the person of Mr. George Green, of Penshurst, dropped dead while speaking to a friend, the cause of death being heart disease. The deceased gentleman, who was 65. years of age, was a native of County Clare, Ireland.

Kerang New Times (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Friday 17 April 1914 p 2 Article
OBITUARY. The death on Wednesday, April 8th, of Mr James Linane at the advanced age of 86, removed a very old and respected resident of the district. The deceased gentleman was born in County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in. Victoria 65 years ago. He selected land at Gannawanca in 1874, which he…

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 18 April 1914 p 4 Article
Railway Fatality at Gatton.
The down Western mail train, which now runs express through Gatton, was pulled up this morning in sight of the people waiting on the Gatton station, as the result of an accident by which Daniel Lane, an old identity of Gatton, met his death (our Gatton correspondent advised last night). Lane was camped in a tent on the western bank of the Lockyer Creek, and had to cross the railway bridge to get to the township. He had almost reached the Gatton side of the bridge this morning, when the Western mail approached. The driver of the engine blew the warning whistle, which apparently confused the unfortunate man, as be stepped on to the track along which the train was travelling. He was lifted on to the cowcatcher, and carried about 50yds., when possibly a jolt at the points threw him on the line, the engine, tender, and front part of the first carriage passing over the body. To remove the body from the rails, the train had to be backed about 1ft., when it was seen that one leg was completely severed, while the other was all but cut from the body; the head had received several cuts, and the body itself was badly cut and bruised. Collector K. Thornton, of the Ipswich branch of the Queensland Ambulance Transport Brigade, was handy to the station and rendered all possible aid until the arrival of Dr. Foy, but the man was past medical help, and expired shortly after his removal to the station The deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland, and was 72 years of age. He had no relatives in the State, and had lived quite alone, doing odd jobs about the district. He was an exceptionally tall man, and apparently in the best of health. At the time of the accident he had £14/ 18/4 in his possession, the pocket containing the gold being cut to pieces, scattering the sovereigns along the line.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 22 April 1914 p 16 Article
Mr. John McGrath, a resident of the district since 1854, died at Axedale on Sunday. He was 90 years of age, and was born in county Clare, Ireland.

Another old identity, Mr. John O'Donnell, died at Marong on Tuesday. Deceased, who was 70 years of age, was also a native of county Clare.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 22 April 1914 p 11 Article
Mr Austen Devitt (aged 35) died at his residence in Palmerin street yesterday afternoon (our Warwick correspondent advised last night) after an illness extending over several months. Deceased was born at Ennistimon County Clare Ireland but at an early age came with his parents to Queensland and settled in Warwick. The late Mr Devitt was a popular member of the local Hibernian Society, and always occupied a prominent position at the annual celebrations. He was for many years connected with the carrying business, and is survived by his widow and five young children.

Warwick Examiner and Times (St. Lucia, Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Wednesday 22 April 1914 p 4 Article
It is with deep regret we chronicle the death of Mr. Austin Devitt, which sad event took place early on Monday afternoon at his residence in Palmerin-street. For some time past deceased, who was only 35 years of age, had been in failing health, and to his many friends the news of his demise was not unexpected. De ceased was born at Ennistimon, County Clare, Ireland, and came to Queensland with his parents. The latter settled down in Warwick, where deceased was educated. The late Mr. Devitt was engaged as a carrier, and his cheerful personality, his unfailing wit, and overflowing good nature endeared him to a very wide circle of friends. He was always a prominent figure in the St. Patrick's Day procession, and as a worker at entertainments he was one of Father Potter's right-hand men. He is survived by his wife and five children, to whom the sympathy of the community will go out. His mother resides in Guy-street, while his three brothers (John, Michael, and William) live in Warwick, James in West Australia, Matthew in Sydney, and two are in the old country. His sister, Mrs. Carey, lives in Brisbane. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, and was largely attended. Members of the Warwick Hibernian Society, in which deceased was also prominent, marched at the head of the cortege.

The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Friday 24 April 1914 Edition: DAILY. p 6 Article
DEATH OF REV A. R. EDGAR NOTED METHODIST CLERGYMAN. AN APPRECIATION. MELBOURNE. Thursday There was no better known name inside the circle of the Methodist Church in Victoria than that of A. R. Edgar, who died to-day. He was one of the few members of that Church whose name was well known outside the Church circle. The itinerancy of the Methodist Church limits the (?) most ministers to the Church circles, but Mr. Edgar's broad human sympathies carried him into very wide spheres in the world of affairs. He was an Irishman, born in County Clare, and when a young minister with his clean-shaven face and touch of an Irish accent, he was frequently a puzzle to strangers who met him, especially while travelling. He was frequently taken for one of another communion, and sometimes the open mistake and much more frequently the puzzled faces of people trying to place his communion greatly amused him. He had such a keen sense of humor that he rather helped than explained the wonder. His early home was at St. Arnaud, from which Wesleyan Ciruit he passed into the Methodist ministry. His fine pressence and throbbing impulsive sympathies made him a strong spiritual force in the pulpit from his earliest preaching years. He came to his work at a time when the revival movements of Calatornia Taylor and Mathew Burnett were spending themselves. He gathered much of the spirit of that movement, but changed and concentrated the methods. He was a man young in years and young in the ministry when he went to the Long Gully part of the Bendigo Circuit. His magnetic presence and personal preaching won the hearts of the miners there. He was a man in whom the general Church was taking much interest. When he went to Pleasant Street, in Ballarat, the Rev. Henry Bath was just leaving Lydiard Street after a three years ministry marked by a remarkable series of sermons, and a pulpit success that reached high-water mark. His introduction of Mr. Edgar to Lydiard Street congregation was that "the young man who was coming was one of the few men who could look down upon him. He was more than 6 feet in height". At this point of time it seems hard to believe that when Mr. Edgar went to Pleasant Street, that was about all most of the Ballarat Methodists knew about him….
Mr. Edgar was 64 years old at the time of his death. He leaves a widow and two daughters. Three brothers survive him. Mr. Henry Edgar, who has just retired from the Post Office, Mr. Edward Edgar, a well-known city agent; and Mr. W. H. Edgar, formerly Minister of Public Works. He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Jennings, wife of a Bathurst police magistrate and Miss Edgar, also of Bathurst.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 2 May 1914 p 7 Article
An old resident of Toowoomba, in the person of Mr Thomas Meagher, who at one time was prominently identified with hotel businesses in the city, died to- day, after a brief illness (our Toowoomba representative advised last night).
Mr Meagher was born in County Clare, Ireland, and while still a youth came to Queensland where he went through all the vicissitudes of the early pioneer. Finally he settled in Toowoomba, where he successfully conducted a number of hotels, amongst others the Western, the Central, the Freomasons' and the Harp of Erin. He retired from business about eight years ago. Mr Meagher was a man of keen business capacity and strict integrity. He is survived by three sons, one of whom Mr E T Meagher, is the well known licensee of the Grand Hotel. The others are Mr. P. Meagher and Mr W. Meagher and one daughter (Mrs Gowinge, jun).

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 8 May 1914 p 8 Article
AN IMMIGRANT'S DEATH.
The pathetic circumstances attending the death of a young assistant motorman, John Reidy, who was killed in a collision between a motor lorry belonging to the Metropolitan Abattoirs Board and a train at Dry Creek on September 4, 1913, were revealed at the Adelaide Local Court on Thursday, when an application for compensation amounting to £66 14/ was made to Mr. J. G. Russell, S.M., on behalf of the dependants. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Reidy, of Glown, County Clare, Ireland, and children. Mr. W. J. Denny, who represented the Public Trustee, put in a declaration from the father of the deceased Daniel Reidy, which showed that he and his family lived on a small holding in an isolated part of County Clare, which consisted chiefly of mountain land. The late John Reidy emigrated to Australia in 1912, and in March, 1913, he sent £5 to his parents. The father's statement went on to say:-"Before my son emigrated to Australia he gave me all his earnings, and one of his principal reasons for emigrating was for the purpose of further assisting me, and to help to send out some of his brothers when able to go." It was also shown that of the children-three brothers and five sisters-the eldest was not 20 years of age, and the youngest three years. An award was made for £50 in terms of the application, as the Abattoirs Board had paid about £16 14/ for funeral expenses.

Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954) Tuesday 19 May 1914 p 6 Article
MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY.
A magisterial inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of John Hallinan, at Depot Hill, on the 9th instant, was held yesterday afternoon before the Police Magistrate, Mr. H. L. Arehdall. Senior-sergeant M. J. Carmody conducted the inquiry. Annie Hallinan, wife of the deceased, stated that she arose about twenty minutes past five o'clock on the morning of the 9th instant. when her husband asked her for a drink of water. She then returned to bed and got up again shortly before six o'clock and went out of doors. Some minutes later she, heard a noise in the bedroom. On entering she saw blood on her husband's clothing and on the pillows. Her husband's throat was cut and he was tearing at it with his left hand. Witness took his hand away and asked why he had done that. He did not reply. She called for assistance. Witness's son telephoned for a doctor, but her husband was dead before the doctor arrived.
When witness got up at a quarter to six o'clock her husband sat up in bed and asked her if there had been a storm. Witness replied in the negative. There was nothing in his manner to indicate that he intended to commit suicide. Her son subsequently told her that he had found a razor in the room with blood-stains on it. The deceased was fifty three years of age and a native of county Clare, Ireland. Witness had been married to the deceased for twenty-one years and they had lived a peaceful life. The deceased had been ill for two years. For the last twelve months he had been unable to do any work. For two weeks before his death he had been confined to his room. For the last week he was strange in his manner. She attributed his strangeness to the morphia which the doctor had injected. William John Hallinan, aged nineteen years, a son of the deceased deposed that some time before his father became confined to his room he said he was tired of life and wished the Lord would take him. Michael Griffin, sergeant of police, also gave evidence. The inquiry was closed.

The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Wednesday 3 June 1914 Edition: DAILY. p 5 Article
Mr John Simpson; sen., of Coghill's Creek, has sustained a sad loss by the death of his wife, which took place yesterday. Mrs Simpson was one of the best-known residents of the district, having resided in that locality for about 40 years. Of a cheerful and kindly disposition, she endeared herself to all classes. Deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland. She will be much missed in the district. She leaves her husband and seven in family. There are 28 grandchildren. The funeral takes place to-day at Coghill's Creek Cemetery.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 8 June 1914 p 15 Article
THE ROMANCE OF A FORTUNE.
NORTH ADELAIDE STORE-KEEPER'S' RELATIVES WANTED.
WHERE IS MICHAEL MALONE?

A few months ago a romantic story was published in "The Advertiser" detailing the circumstances of the search for an heir to a fortune of over £4,000 left by the late Miss Mary Maria Malone, who for many years had kept a small store on the corner of Jeffcott and Buxton streets, North Adelaide. A sequel to that story was related before his Honor Mr. Justice Gordon, in the Supreme Court on Saturday morning, when Mr. O. T. Hargraves, jun., on behalf of the Public Trustee, applied for direction as to whether they could accept the evidence tendered on behalf of certain claimants as sufficiently establishing their rights to a share in the estate.
It appeared from Mr. Hargraves' statement of the case, and from documents in court, that Miss Malone had arrived in Australia practically penniless, but had, by the application of industry and thrift, and by the aid of several friends, succeeded in amassing an estate which, on her death on July 24, 1912, had realised £4,300. Miss Malone left no will, and the Public Trustee advertised in the news- papers and in the "Government Gazette" for any claimants in Australia. He received no answers from the Commonwealth, however. While in England on a holiday it had occurred to him to make enquiries there for possible relatives. The only clue he had was a remark the deceased had made, which had been remembered by the people who had known her in Adelaide, to the effect that "she used, in her infancy, to play in the fields of a rich man named Quaker Lloyd, of Birmingham." Mr. H. Ernest Sargent, a solicitor of Birmingham, undertook the enquiries, and in a very short time discovered a sister, Mrs. Margaret Campbell, of 105, Woodland-road Handsworth, and two nieces and two nephews. Further enquiries had led to the belief that the late Miss Malone was the daughter of Michael Malone and Bridget Malone (nee Hare), who had been married in County Clare or County Galway, in 1835 or 1836, but it had been impossible to obtain particulars of the marriage. The Catholic Church had been asked to make what search was possible; but they had replied that "one might as well look for John Smith in London as Malone in County Clare, unless one knew his parish." Affidavits, however, had been obtained from people who remembered the family. So far as could be ascertained, there were only four children of the marriage. There was no direct proof to the contrary of that, but his Honor accepted that as a fair assumption on the evidence produced. The four children were-The late Mary Maria Malone (of North Adelaide), Michael Malone, Thomas Malone, and Margaret Malone. Margaret Malone had since become Mrs. Campbell, and she was the sister already referred to. Thomas Malone was dead, but he had left four children-James, Mary Anne (now Mrs. Matthews), Elizabeth (now Mrs. George Arthur Bennett), and Thomas. Michael Malone, the fourth member of the original family, had always been a wanderer. He had last been heard of in the hop fields of Kent, about 16 or 17 years ago. If he were alive he would be about 70 years of age, but his relatives believed he was dead. Letters written by the late Miss Malone to Mrs. Campbell, and the family of her brother Thomas, established their identity beyond question. There had been a claim by a Michael Malone, of America, but it had been shown beyond doubt that he was not the man wanted.

His Honor intimated that he would accept the proof tendered of the marriage of Michael Malone and Bridget Hare, and would also assume that there were only four children of that marriage, of whom the late Mary Maria Malone was one. The estate, by devolution of law, was divisible amongst the brothers and sisters of the deceased, or among their children. He would therefore make an order that Margaret Campbell should receive one-third of the estate. The third which would have gone to Michael would be retained by the Public Trustee until further enquiries had been made and notices given, in order to make sure as far as possible that he was not alive, and that he had left no issue who would be entitled to claim his share. The remaining one-third would be divided amongst the children of Thomas who were now alive.

It was directed that the costs involved in the enquiries, both in Australia and in England, should be paid out of the estate before it was divided. It is under- stood that the families who will benefit by the division are in needy circumstances.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 13 June 1914 p 13 Family Notices
NEYLON. —On the 12th June, at 89 Edinburgh street, Burnley, Martin, widower of the late Ellen Neylon, beloved father of Catherine (Mrs. P. Marzorini), Ted, Annie, Mary, and the late Frank Neylon, and grandfather of Mary, Eileen, Marcella, Paula, and Bernadette Marzorini, aged 75 years. Native of County Clare, Ireland. A colonist of 57 years. No flowers, by request. R.I.P.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 19 June 1914 p 8 Family Notices
DUFFY.-At St. Vincent's Hospital, after a few days' illness, Cornelius, son of the late Mr. Thomas Duffy, Cloonawilllin, County Clare, Ireland, and nephew of the late Mr. Cornelius Duffy, of Argyle-street, Sydney. R.I.P.

The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld : 1875 - 1929) Saturday 4 July 1914 p 38 Article
The Warwick correspondent of the "Brisbane Courier" telegraphing on Tuesday last, says: "An old identity, in the person of Mr. John Cleary, has passed away in the Warwick Hospital. Mr. Cleary, who was eighty-six years of age, arrived in Queensland from Ireland shortly before Governor Bowen took office in this state. He first resided at Toowoomba when that city was in its infancy. and later he visited many parts of the state. He had many interesting stories to tell of stirring encounters with the blacks in the district around the Thomson River. He was one of the party that set out to avenge the murder of the Fraser family by the blacks, and he also accompanied the party that went out to punish the blacks who were responsible for the massacre of the Wills family and their station hands near the Nogoa River, in the Central West. Mr. Cleary who is survived by one son. was born in County Clare, Ireland, and for the last twelve years had resided in Warwick.

Queensland Figaro (Brisbane, QLD : 1901 - 1936) Thursday 9 July 1914 p 12 Family Notices
June 29th.-Miss Bertha Mary Cullinan, of County Clare, Ireland, to Mr. Alfred Davis, at St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, Toowoomba.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 15 July 1914 p 1 Family Notices
NEYLAN. —On the 13th July, at his residence, "Seaforth," Dryburgh-street, North Melbourne, James, the dearly loved husband of Ellen Neylan, loving father of Mrs F. A. Ward, Mrs. F. O Brien, Mrs. W.P. Caffrey, Mrs. R.G. Carroll, Maggie, Agnes, T.J. (Geelong), James A., John J., Patrick, Francis and William, aged 60 years. Native of Quinn, County Clare, Ireland. (Interred Cemetery 14th inst.) Requiescat in pace.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 18 July 1914 p 18 Family Notices
CREIGHTON.-July 11, 1914, Kate, relict of the late John Creighton and eldest sister of Mrs. Connell, of Bowral, aged 70 years. R.I.P.

CREIGHTON.-July 11, 1914, at the residence of her niece, Mrs. O. J. Archbold, Windsor, Mowbray-road, Willoughby, Kate, relict of the late John Creighton, of Paddington, and eldest daughter of Michael Griffen, of Gower, county Clare, Ireland, aged 70 years. R.I.P.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 30 July 1914 p 1 Family Notices
McNAMARA. —On the 28th July, at the residence of his sister, Mrs. H O Brien, No. 84 Palmerston crescent, South Melbourne, Martin James, the eldest son of the late Michael and Bridget McNamara of Bally Griffy, County Clare, lreland, and brother of Mrs H. O'Brien and Jack (late of Foy's, Sydney) and James (of Adelaide), aged 56 years. Rest in peace.

Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954) Friday 14 August 1914 p 8 Article
A correspondent writes:—" General regret was expressed in Gladstone on Saturday when it became known that Mrs. D. Connellan had passed away after a protracted illness. The deceased lady was born in Miltown-Malbay, County Clare, Ireland fifty years ago. She. arrived in Brisbane in 1886. and afterward resided at Barcaldine, Rockhampton and Glad- stone. She was held in high esteem by all who know her. She left a husband, four sons, and two daughters. Numerous expressions of heartfelt sympathy were tendered Mr. Connellan. The funeral took place on Sunday, the Rev. Father Thierry performing the last rites. The escort was provided by the Hibernians and the members of the St. Joseph's branch of the society marched in regalia. The members of the Waratah Football Club and the Port Curtis Rugby Football Union and many others also attended. Wreaths were sent by the Hibernian Society, the Port Curtis Ruby Union, the Waratah Football Club, and many private residents.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 17 August 1914 p 6 Family Notices
HOWARD.-August 15, 1914, at her residence, 248 Barcom-avenue, Darlinghurst, Bridget Howard, native of county Clare, Ireland, aged 73 years. R.I.P.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Friday 21 August 1914 p 1 Family Notices
RYAN .-On the 20th August, 1914, Timothy Ryan (of the Customs department, and formerly of the G.P.O.), the dearly beloved husband of Bridget Ryan, of No. 38 Salisbury-street, Moonee Ponds, and loving father of Nonie, Marie, and Jack, eldest loving son of the late John and Mary Ryan, of County Clare, Ireland. Requieseat in pace.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Saturday 5 September 1914 p 4 Article
Obituary.

MRS. S. BURCHARD.On Friday morning, August 21, there passed away one of the oldest residents of Tantanoola, in the person of Mrs. Susanna Burchard, wife of Mr. Jos. Burchard. The deceased had been in indifferent health for a long time, and was confined to her bed for some months. Mrs. Burchard was the daughter of the late Mr. Michael Kain, and was born at Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, 68 years ago. With her parents she left Ireland over 60 years ago, and came to Adelaide. For some time she lived at Mount Barker, and travelled overland to Mount Gambier over 50 years ago. The deceased was twice married, and leaves two by the first marriage--Mr. J. C. Gordon and Mrs. J. McCarthy--and three by the second marriage--Messrs. C. F. and J. P. Burchard and Miss L. Burchard. On Saturday morning her body was brought to St. Clare's Catholic Church, where a requiem mass was conducted by the Rev. Father Gazmayer. The funeral cortege then left for the Millicent cemetery. The Rev. Father Gatzmayer officiated at the grave.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 9 September 1914 p 8 Article
OBITUARY.
LORD CHIEF JUSTICE OF IRELAND.
LONDON, September 7.
The death is announced of Lord O'Brien. P.C., LL.D. (Lord Chief Justice of Ire» land), at the age of 72.
Peter O'Brien, first Baron O'Brien, was the fifth son of the late John O'Brien, M.P., of Elmvale and Ballynalacken Castle, County Clare, and was born on June 29, 1842. He was married in 1867 to Annie, daughter of Robert Hare Clarke, of Bansha, County Tipperary, and there are two daughters. He was educated, and took his M.A. degree at Trinity College, Dublin, of which in later years he became Visitor. He was admitted as a barrister at King's Inn, Dublin, and became Q.C. in 1880. In 1881 he was appointed Junior Crown Counsel at Green-street, Dublin, Senior Crown Counsel the following year, Third Serjeant and Bencher of Inn in 1884, and Second Serjeant the following year. In 1887-8 he was Solicitor-General for Ireland, Attorney-General in 1888-9, and has been Lord Chief Justice of Ireland since then. He was created Baronet in 1882. and baron in 1900. There is no heir to the title.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 9 September 1914 p 8 Article
Mr. Thomas Pilkington died at his residence, Jamestown, on September 5. He had been ill for four or five months, and the Very Rev. Father Doyle and Father Kennedy, in addition to the Sisters of St. Joseph, were in constant attendance during his entire illness. Mr. Pilkington was born near Ennis, county Clare, in 1842. He reached South Australia in 1856 on board the ship Lord Hungerford. He worked as a farmer at Mintaro for 25 years, and later at Bundaleer Springs for 17 years. During the past five years he had lived in Jamestown as a retired gentleman. He left a widow, two brothers (Messrs. James Pilkington, Torrensville, Adelaide; and William Pilkington, Jamestown), and one sister (Mrs. Brown, of Anlaby).

The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) Friday 18 September 1914 p 5 Article
The death of Mrs. Bridget Ryan, of David-street, Horsham, indicates another mark in the slow but sure disappearance in the number of the list of pioneers of the district. Although she had turned her 80th year, Mrs. Ryan was actively engaged in the presence of home duties up to the eve of her demise, which took place at her home early on Friday morning last, and although she had been under medical treatment on various occasions her sudden end came as a shock to her large circle of friends, by whom she will be missed and long remembered, on account of her kindly disposition. She was born in Innis Diamond, County Clare, Ireland, and came as a single woman to this country in the year 1854, and later married Mr. Jas. F. Ryan, in 1859, with whom she came to the Wimmera this same year, and later, in the year 1873, selected land near Natimuk, upon ,which they resided and reared their family. Subsequently they disposed of their farm and retired to Horsham 30 years ago, where they have resided ever since. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved husband and family, of whom four predeceased their mother, namely, Julia (Mrs. E. Walsh), Jos. Jas. Ryan, Matilda Ryan, Fabian Ryan. Mrs. D. Hanan, of Natimuk, and Mrs. R. Mason, of Stawell are the surviving members. The funeral took place at 2.30. on Saturday, and was well attended, the Rev. Father Wood con ducting the service at the grave, and the pall-bearers were Messrs. Jas. Walsh, Jos. and Richard Hannan (grandsons of deceased), Mr. R. Mason (son-in-law), and Messrs. J. Pryor and T. Taylor. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Mr. Weight.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 19 September 1914 p 12 Article
Mike .Gilligan entered a police office, and intimated that some abominable thief bad stolen his watch; but, more than that, it had been given to Michael by his father, back in County Clare. He told a very stirring story about his loss. The officer at the desk was much impressed. "We'll leave no stone unturned to find your watch, Mr. Gilligan," He said. “Thank ye. sor," said Mr. Gilligan. "'Twas a foine watch." Mr. Gilligan went home, and there found his watch. It had slipped out from beneath his pillow, and in some way landed beneath, the sheets. He hurried to the police office to report the fact and save the policeman further trouble. On the way he came across a gang of labourers tearing up the streets for sewer purposes. "Hi! bhoys," called Mike, "lave thim stones alone; I've found me watch."

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 21 September 1914 p 8 Family Notices
O'CONNOR.-September 19, 1914, at her residence, 92 Burren-street, Erskineville, Bridget, dearly beloved wife of Martin O'Connor, a native of County Clare, Ireland, and late of Windsor and Richmond, aged 76 years. R.I.P.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Thursday 8 October 1914 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 2 Family Notices
THE LATE MRS. CATHERINE BURNS. The funeral of the late Mrs. Catherine Burns, relict of the late Mr. William Burns, of Fremantle, took place on Sunday afternoon, the 4th instant, and was very largely attended. The deceased lady, who was in her 50th year, was born in County Clare, Ireland, but has resided in the Australian States for the last 32 years, and in Western Australia 18 years. She leaves a grown-up family of two sons and two daughters to mourn their loss. The long funeral cortege moved from her late residence, King-street, East Fremantle and proceeded to St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, Adelaide-street, where a service was held, and thence to the Fremantle Cemetery, where the Rev. Father J. Smyth, O.M.I., officiated at the graveside. The chief mourners were:— Messrs. James and William Burns (sons), Miss Maggie Burns (daughter), Mrs. A. Gallagher (sister), and Mr. A. Gallagher (brother-in-law). The pall-bearers were: —Messrs. T. Corti, F. .Shingler, T. Gray, D. M'Fall, D. Jaysur, and E. Hayes. Many handsome wreaths were placed on the grave, and numerous telegrams, cards, etc expressing sympathy have been received by the relatives. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Arthur E. Davies and Co., of Fremantle and Claremont.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 18 November 1914 p 8 Article
DEATH OF MR. JAMES M'MAHON.
PROMINENT CARRIER.

Mr. James M'Mahon, one of the best-known figures in the carrying trade of Sydney, passed away yesterday morning, at his residence, Redfern, at the, age of 77 years. Mr. M'Mahon was about as usual on Friday last, looking the picture of health, but that night, he contracted a chill, and on Saturday took to his bed.

Mr. M'Mahon came from County Clare, in Ireland. He arrived in Sydney when a lad of nine years, and at 14 was driving a cart delivering coal for a man named Murphy, who carried on business as a coal merchant in Woolloomooloo. Mr. M'Mahon saved enough money to purchase a horse and cart of his own, and from that day he gradually progressed, until he became Sydney's leading carrier. His firm at the present time has 250 teams, with 537 horses, daily employed in the city carrying wood and general merchandise. Mr. M'Mahon held the contract for carting wool from Darling Harbour railway station to the stores, and again from the stores to the ships, since 1871, and old residents will remember how determinedly he figured in the carriage of the wool from the railway to the wool stores at the Quay during the Maritime Strike in 1890.

In the course of the last 20 years Mr. M'Mahon, with his teams, carried millions of bales of wool from Darling Harbour, and thousands of tons of merchandise from the ships' slings to the warehouses and bonds. The average number of bales of wool carried by his teams during the last year or two was about 650,000 per year. But last year the total rose to 750,000 bales. Mr. M'Mahon was a large property owner, both in the city and in Redfern, and he was also the owner of Amaroo station, near Orange, and Bumbaldry station, near Cowra. He was until a year or two ago president of the Master Carriers' Association, and during the last few years he represented the employers on the Trolly and Draymen's Wages Board.

Mr. M'Mahon left a widow, six sons, and one daughter. His eldest son is Major James M'Mahon, of the Light Horse. He and four of his brothers are engaged in the carrying business, or are in- charge of their father's stations, while one son, Mr. W. D. M'Mahon, is a solicitor. The whole of the sons are well-known Rugby footballers. Mr. James M'Mahon, who is the old Randwick full-back, took charge of the Rugby team which visited the old country in 1908-9.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Friday 18 December 1914 p 1 Family Notices
SAUNDERS. —On the 17th December, at the resilience of her son-in-law, No. 2 Glover street, South Melbourne, Mary, relict of the late Benjamin Saunders, and loving mother of Mrs. Glynn, and beloved sister of Mrs. Whelan (of Richmond), and John Neville (of County Clare, Ireland), aged 72 years. No flowers, by request. Rest in peace.

Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954) Monday 28 December 1914 p 4 Article
DEATH OF A PIONEER,
Quite a gloom was cast over Bangalow on Christmas Eve when it became known that one of the most popular and esteemed residents of the district, Mr. Edmond Slattery, had, in the prime of life, passed away to the great majority. He was born in Tipperary, Ireland, on the 3rd October, 1857, and at the time of his death was just past his 57th year. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Slattery. He arrived in Australia in 1881, landing at Sydney, where he remained for a couple of years, and in 1881 came to the Richmond and settled at what is now called Bangalow, but was then only dense scrub. Subsequently he purchased a farm on the Power estate close by, where he lived till the time of his death. In 1887 he married Miss Elizabeth Guerin, a native of County Clare, Ireland. Of a hearty and genial nature he made many friends, and his sole aim in life was in assisting in the betterment of the district in which he lived. He was one of the prime movers in the formation of the North Coast creamery at Byron Bay, and ever since had taken a prominent part in matters pertaining to it, as well as being a big shareholder. He was an ardent worker for the Bangalow A. and I. Society, and helped greatly to bring it to its present fine position among country societies. In politics he was a staunch Liberal, and was mainly responsible for the establishment of the Bangalow Association, being also its President. When war broke out he came to the fore in starting the Patriotic League. The position of President of the local branch of the Hibernian Lodge was filled by him also. As a committeeman for years of the Progress Association he was responsible for many up-to-date and progressive methods and movements that helped to bring the district to the fore. The School of Arts was also not neglected by him.

Mr. Slattery brought the first Alderro/*' and Jerseys to the district nearly 30 years ago, and was always a believer in breeding the best. An earnest and consistent member of St. Kevin's Church he did great service in the building of the church and convent. In the Catholic Federation he was deeply interested, and was the first president of the local branch of the League. To mourn their loss he leaves a widow, five sons and one daughter, viz.- Dr. Matthew J. Slattery, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Edward Pat rick, John Kevin, William Francis, Thomas Michael, Mary J., one sister, Mrs, Guerin, Possum Creek, and brother, Mr. Patrick Slattery (Rooty Hill). With the exception of one son, William, who is being educated at Nudgee, and was with the encampment at the cable station, Southport, the whole of his family were with him when he passed peacefully away. Until about two months ago he had en joyed exceptionally good health, but diabetes only a week before his death developed serious complications, and despite all that could be done by his medical attendants, Drs. Corlis and Lentaigne, the end came. The remains were interred in the Roman Catholic cemetery, and the cortege that followed to the last resting place, was the largest ever seen in Bangalow, and was considerably over a mile long. Although it was Christmas Day and the notice so short, not only Bangalow and district were represented, but many mourners also attended from Murwillumbah, Tweed Heads, Kyogle, Hallina, Wardell, Casino, Lismore, and other parts, The Hibernians lead the procession. The last rites were performed by Rev. Fathers Williams and Battle, and also present were the Rev. E.J. Merchant (Church of England), and Mr. T, G. Mason (Church of Christ). At the grave side Father Williams said they had not only lost a friend, but the very best friend. Personal as well as in church matters his life had been an example to all other members of the faith as a true Christian in every sense of the word. On behalf of not only the Catholic community, but also the citizens, he extended the deepest sympathy to the relatives left behind. It was gratifying to know in what esteem the deceased was held by all with whom he came in contact, that not only his own clergy but those of other denominations honored the family by paying their respect by attending at the grave side. Among the numerous wreaths was one from the Patriotic League and also one from his old friend, Mr. Andrew French, Bangalow (cousin of General French).

Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916) Tuesday 29 December 1914 p 17 Family Notices
CURRY. -. On December 26th, at Kalgoorlie, W A.. Patrick, beloved son of John and Mary Curry, and late of County Clare Ireland. Aged 47 years. R I P.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 28 December 1914 p 7 Article
GEN SIR THOMAS KELLY-KENNY LONDON, December 26.

The death is announced of Gen. Sir Thomas Kelly-Kenny, G.C.B., G.C.V.O., at the age of 74 who several years ago retired on account of his age. He was regarded as one of the ablest British generals. Born on February 27, 1840, at Kilrush, County Clare, Gen. Kelly-Kenny entered the army in 1858 as an ensign in the 2nd Foot. His first extra-regimental service was at the Cape of Good Hope, when he commanded the escort of the General Officer Commanding (Gen. Sir James Jackson), and later he was appointed A.D.C. on the new staff. On the outbreak of the war with China in 1860, he accompanied his regiment from the Cape to the Far East. He was present at the action of Sinho, and went to Shanghai to help to suppress the rising there, being present at the assault and capture of Tangku and Taku Forts, and winning mention in despatches. Obtaining his company in 1866, he served in the Abyssinian campaign of 1867-68, in command of a division of the transport train, being mentioned in des- patches for "zeal, energy, and ability." During 1874 he assumed the additional sur-name of Kenny. In December, 1875, he graduated at the Staff College, and including four years in command of the 2nd Battalion and the command of the depot and 2nd Regimental District at Guildford, he was D.A.Q.M.G. on the staffs of Lord Napier and Sir A. Gordon in India; A.A.G., Northern District, at York, 1887- 92, during which time he commanded the great North of England training camp on Strensall Common; A.A.G. at the War Office in 1893: A.A.G. and Chief Staff Officer to Field-Marshal H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught, and commanded the 3rd Infantry Brigade at Aldershot in 1896-7. In 1897 he was promoted major-general in the army, and was appointed Inspector-General of Auxiliary Forces and Recruiting at the War Office, which post he held until 1899, when he succeeded Sir Redvers Buller in the command of the troops at Aldershot. In 1899, he was appointed to command the 6th Division of the South African Field Force, and sailed in company with the late Lord Roberts. He was destined to play an important part in Lord Robert's plan of campaign for after lot of forced marching and "hustling," he was able by February 15 to take up Gen. French s position, leaving the latter free to accomplish the movement which led to the memorable relief of Kimberley on the same evening. Gen. Kelly-Kenny's 6th Division succeeded in pursuing the Boer Army retreating towards Bloemfontein, and in capturing a large convoy of 78 wagons. Continuing the pursuit, Gen. Cronje's army of 5,000 was brought to bay at Koodoos- rand, and, after desperate resistance, was compelled to unconditionally surrender at Paardeberg on February 27 (Majuba Day). Gen. Kelly-Kenny's next great achievement was at Driefontein on March 10, where his gallant 6th Division achieved the victory which first made the Boers realize the superiority of their antagonists, crushed their power of resistance, and opened the gates of the Free State capital to the British. Subsequently Lieut.-Gen. Kelly-Kenny was given the command of the Orange River Colony, and directed the various operations between the Orange River and the Vaal, including the actions at Ladybrand (September 2 to 5, 1900). In 1901 he returned home. On October 1, 1901, he took up the responsible post of Adjutant-General to the Forces, which he held until 1904, when the Esher Commission issued its report, resulting in the establishment of the present Army Council. Gen. Kelly-Kenny, who attained that rank on August 25, 1905, retired from the army on February 12, 1907, He was made K.C.B. in 1902, G.C.B. in 1904, and G.C.V.O, in 1906, while he was a J.P. and a D.L. for the County of Clare.

Clarence and Richmond Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1889 - 1915) Thursday 31 December 1914 p 1 Family Notices
DONOHUE.-On December 16th, 1914, at Green Ridge, Richmond River, Martin Donohue, native of county Clare, Ireland; aged 68 years. Inserted by his loving sister, M. Laidley. R.I.P.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 9 January 1915 p 11 Article
By the death on New Year's Day of Mrs Ellen Myatt, Georgetown has lost one of its oldest settlers. Mrs. Myatt, who was in her eightieth year, was born in County Clare. Ireland, and arrived in South Australia in 1852. She and her husband (who predeceased her 23 years ago) settled nine miles south of Clare. For the past 40 years Mrs. Myatt was a resident of the Georgetown district, and most popular with young and old. She has left 11 children, eight sons and three daughters—Messrs. Thomas, James, William, Joseph, John, Michael, Bryan, and Walter Myatt, Mesdames A. G. Head (Huddleston), J. Connolly (Gladstone), and Miss Elizabeth Myatt, who resides at home.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Thursday 7 January 1915 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 5 Article
Death of a Sister of Mercy
ON XMAS EVE
In the midst of the usual activity, in the artistic harmonising of scenery with the Christian delights of the Xmas holidays, it frequently happens in populous centres that an additional vacant chair recalls the death, one of our most estimable citizens of the day before. Such indeed was the trying ordeal of the Sisters of Mercy, Victoria Square, Perth, when it was made known that Sister Mary Brendan breathed her last about 11 a.m. on Xmas Eve. A sense of the existence of the intense gloom pervading the convent, inspired the visitors and a kindly, hushed sympathy from interested onlookers was meted out to the superioress, the Rev. Mother M. Brigid McDonald, the mother assistant and the 35 other sisters of the community. It was evident that death had withheld from this privileged community a continuation of the advantages accruing from daily intercourse with Sister Brendan who, like Sister Theresa of the Child Jesus, was singularly gifted with a most natural grace of manner in the discharge of every task allotted her. In addition to this, her brilliant accomplishments and exquisite faculty of imparting knowledge were an important contribution to the maintenance of the recognised high standard of intellectual proficiency that obtained in the Con vent of Mercy, in Western Australia. The solemn requiem mass was celebrated by his Grace Archbishop Clune at 9 o'clock on Saturday, the feast of St. Stephen in the oratory attached to the convent. The Sisters of Mercy discharged the duties of choir most impressively. After mass, in the presence of the dead, the Archbishop read the usual prayers, and the Rev. H. Kearin sang the 'Libera me Domine.' Many of the priests of the metropolitan area were present. The Very Rev. Father Creagh, Superior of the Redemptorists in the West was present, accompanied by Fathers M'Dermott and M'Geean. The Oblate Fathers from Fremantle were also represented. The funeral procession wended its way to Karrakatta Cemetery, where Father O'Neill, of Cottesloe, assisted by several priests, performed the last rites of the Church. The Sisters of Mercy also assisted at the grave, and the earnest ness of their intercessory appeals, filled with hope, in favor of the departed soul, conveyed the impression that, though they cherished the memory of her good example, and saintly life, the heartrending separation had brought them sorrow upon sorrow. The deceased was born 21 years ago at Cooracare, in the west of County Clare. Her mother, Mrs. Darcy, is still living, but her father is dead. She was one of the postulants brought out from Ireland by Rev. Mother Brigid, of Victoria Square, as a result of her visit to the old country in 1911. They arrived in Perth on New Year's Day, 1912. Sister Mary Brendan led a most, edifying life in the Convent, was a model of perfection, and a general favorite. She was professed by His Grace the Archbishop in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, on the 1st of October last. She continued teaching until her sudden, sad collapse ten days previous to her death. [Mary Darcy b 10 April 1892 to parents Michael Darcy and Margaret Campbell, entered the Convent 5 January 1912, died 24 December 1914 at Perth WA. - moh]

Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Monday 11 January 1915 Edition: DAILY. p 3 Article
An old resident of Kirkstall, in the person of Mrs. McCormick, sen. died at her residence, Kirkstall, on 2nd. inst. after a brief illness. With her parents she came to Victoria at the age of eight years ,from County Clare, Ireland, and has lived in the district since, first at Killarney, and then for nearly 40 years at Kirkstall. She was 70 years of age at the time of her death. Deceased has many friends throughout the district who speak highly of her neighborly and many other good qualities. She leaves a sorrowing husband and family of eleven (five sons and six daughters) to mourn their loss.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 13 January 1915 p 1 Family Notices
BLAKE. -On the 11th January, at his residence, 24 Gourlay street, East St. Kilda, Richard Joseph, the dearly beloved husband of Catherine Blake, and loving father of M., P., J., P., B., M., and K., and fond grandfather of little Marie and Desmond, and loved brother of John, of Ennistymon, County Clare, Ireland. R.I.P. (Interred privately on the 12th inst.)

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 8 February 1915 p 4 Article
By the death on Wednesday last of Mr. John Noonan, the Georgetown district has lost one of its oldest and most esteemed settlers. Born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1840, Mr. Noonan, came to South Australia in 1851 by the ship Marian, which on that trip was wrecked on the coast near Adelaide. The deceased gentleman married the eldest daughter of the late Mr. Thomas Hynes, of Georgetown. The family settled at Gumeracha, and carried on farming operations on land rented from the South Australian Company. Later they removed to Kapunda, and after spending 18 years there came to Gulnare. Mr. Noonan was one of the pioneers of the district. His connection with the pastoral industry extended over 50 years. He was a firm believer in the merino class of sheep, and was a keen breeder of them at Georgetown and Koolunga. For more than 20 years Mr. Noonan represented Gulnare in the District Council of Georgetown, and during the greater portion of that time occupied the position of Chairman of the council. He was also a member of the north-eastern district of the Licensing Bench for many years. Mr. Noonan retired about six years ago, and resided at Georgetown until his death. A widow, six sons, five daughters, and 21 grandchildren survive. The members of the deceased's family living are: — Messrs. J. J. Noonan, of Hornsdale, T. M. and J. L. Noonan, of Gulnare, P. F. Noonan, of Jamestown, P. J. Noonan, of Georgetown, and C. L. Noonan, of Adelaide; and Mesdames W. M. Martin, of Jamestown and J. C. Myatt, Georgetown; Sister Mary Gonzales, of the Dominican Convent at Glenelg, and Misses D. G. and A. M. Noonan, of Georgetown.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 9 February 1915 p 13 Article
DEATH OF AN OLD SETTLER.
GEORGETOWN. February 6-Mr. John Noonan, one of the most successful of the pioneers of the Gulnare Plain, died here on February 3. He was born in County Clare in 1840, and came to South Australia with his parents in 1851. The family first settled at Gumeracha and farmed land rented from the South Australian Company. Later they moved to Kapunda, where they lived for l8 years. When the Northern Areas were opened up Mr. Noonan selected land on the Gulnare Plain, where he combined wheat and sheep farming. Being successful, he was able to add to his property, and at the time of his retirement to Georgetown, five years ago, he was the largest farmer in the district. He was a justice of the peace, and also a member of the North-Eastern Licensing Bench. For many years he represented Gulnare in the Georgetown District Council; and for a considerable time was chair- man. In religious matters he always took a leading part. At Yackamoorundie in the early days, and later on at Georgetown, he was a firm supporter of the convent schools. One of his daughters joined the Dominican Convent at Cabra, and Sister Modesta of the St. Joseph's Convent is his sister. [Bridget Noonan, born 8 October 1849 County Clare to parents, John Noonan and Catherine Cummins, entered convent 11 December 1869, died 25 January 1937 at Kensington, NSW - moh] He married a daughter of the late Mr. Thomas Hynes, of Gulnare, in 1865 He left a widow, six sons (Messrs. J. J. Noonan, of Hornsdale; .T. M. Noonan, of Gulnare; P. F. Noonan, of Jamestown; H. J. Noonan, of Georgetown; J. L. Noonan, of Gulnare; and C.L. Noonan, of Adelaide), and five daughters (Mrs. W.M. Martin, of Jamestown; Mrs. J. C. Myatt, of Geogetown; and Misses D. G., and A. M. Noonan, of Georgetown.

Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954) Saturday 20 March 1915 p 5 Article
Mrs. P. Dowd, a lady of ninety-five years of age, passed away at Emerald on the 10th instant. She left a family of two daughters, three sons, twenty-five grandchildren, and two great-grand children. Mrs. Dowd was a native of Ennistiman, County Clare. Ireland, and arrived at Townsville in 1884. From there she went to Emerald, where she remained until the date of her death.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 22 March 1915 p 6 Article
Honour was paid to a mother of soldiers at Kildysart, County Clare, Ireland, on Sunday, February 7. The remains of Mrs. O’Halloran, a widow, were carried to the cemetery and laid to rest with military honours. Three of Mrs. O’Halloran's sons are serving in the army in France.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 29 March 1915 p 8 Article
A remarkable funeral took place at Kildysart, County Clare, on Sunday, February 7, when Mrs. O’Halloran, a widow, was buried with military honors. Three of Mrs. O’Halloran's sons are serving in the army in France. The local Volunteer marched at the head of the funeral in martial order with banners flying and wooden rifles. Everyone connected with the army turned out to honor the dead mother of the three soldiers, one of whom, John, was reported missing a short time ago. All the sons are over 6 ft. in height.

The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 17 April 1915 p 2 Article
The many friends of the late Mr. Patrick O'Loughlin (or "Sir Bryan"), as he was familiarly known) will be sorry to hear of his demise. He had a career worthy of note. He was born in County Clare Ireland, 1842. Coming to this country when a young man, his first employment was as a boundary rider, in the Western district for a squatter named Ayr, and he had for a fellow employee Marcus Clark, writer of "His natural Life," &c. Mr. O'Loughlin joined the Police, and was a trooper in the Beechworth Gold Escort, then he was stationed in Kyneton, Bacchus Marsh, Eganstown, Melton (for 8-years). then he received his first promotion (Senior constable) and reluctantly left Melton to take charge at Williamstown. Then Kew and Windsor. While stationed at the latter place, he took an important part in unearthing the Deeming murder cases. Mr. O'Loughlin was 48 years in the Police force, and while stationed in Melton the Kelly gang broke out in 1878. He was a volunteer for their search, and for nine months he was on this duty, when the married men were called home. He was well liked by all, and he retired on a pension some 13 years ago, and returned to Melton to live, where he spent the remainder of his days in peace. His family is grown-up and married, but his widow is still here. He was in the Royal Irish Constabulary before coming to Australia, and was a man of good military appearance and bearing, and many are the tales he used to tell of his exploits while on Police duty.

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Saturday 24 April 1915 p 2 Article
There passed away at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. T. .M'Mahon, of Lawrence street, Camperdown, yesterday morning, an old and highly-respected resident in the person of Mrs. Bridget Leyden, relict of the late Mr. P. Leyden. The deceased lady had reached the ripe age of 73 years. She was a native of County Clare. Ireland, and but for a short term, which she spent in Western Australia, she lived 40 years of her life in Camperdown. She was widely known in this community and sincere sympathy has been extended to the bereaved relatives. She leaves two daughters (Mrs. T. M'Mahon, Camperdown; and Mrs Henryon, Redcliffe Park, W.A.,) and three sons (Messrs P.J. Leyden, postmaster, Bullfinch, Mr .J. Leyden, Nth. Fremantle, and Mr. F. Leyden, Tammin) to mourn their loss. The funeral is to take place at 2.30 on Sunday day afternoon, when the remains will be laid to rest in the Camperdown Cemetery.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 4 May 1915 p 6 Article
THE SHARE OF IRELAND.
Ireland has done wonders. Up to the end of February nearly 100,000 Irishmen from the Green Isle alone had joined the army, while the Irish race from Great Britain and the Dominions had sent at least 250,000 men to the colors. I make no claim for Ireland, except that Ireland is doing her duty, declared Mr. John Redmond at Manchester last month. "Our record is one of which we can be proud. If we turn for a moment to the record of performances at the front I think we Irishmen can hold up our heads. Sir John French is an Irishman; he springs from good-old Irish stock. Admiral Beatty is an Irishman from the County Wexford. Admiral Carden, who is bombarding the Dardanelles, is an Irishman from Tipperary. The lieutenant commander of the destroyer that sank the U1- the other day is a Creagh, from County Clare. And if we leave the high in rank and go down to the rank and file, I think the name of Michael O'Leary, V.C. will be forever associated with the history of this war. If you look at the performances at the front from another point of view and look at the casualty lists, and see how whole regiments of Irish troops have been almost wiped out. I do not think any man will be found to deny that Ireland is doing her duty. In Lancashire alone 40,000 Irishmen have enlisted."

Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Hobart, Tas. : 1890 - 1922) Friday 7 May 1915 p 2 Family Notices
CURTIN.— On May 4, 1915, at his late residence Moonah, Francis Curtin, of County Clare, Ireland, in the 80th year of his age. R I. P.

The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918) Friday 21 May 1915 p 2 Article
Private Robert Douglas Niblock, of Colac, died from wounds sustained at the Dardanelles. He was born in the County Clare, Ireland, and came to Victoria nine years ago, and was in the employ of Mr. W. R. Edgar for some time. He was 33 years of age and was married to the eldest daughter of Mr. W. Marriner. Prior to joining the 8th Battalion of the First Contingent, he was in charge of Mr. Marriner's farm at Barongarook.

Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 20 May 1915 Edition: MORNING. p 1 Article
October 11-Marriage, on 26th September, at St Michael's R.C. Church, Horsham, by Rev Father O'Farrell, Martin, youngest son of the late Thomas Meehan, County Clare, Ireland, to Nora Margaret, daughter of Mr Patrick Nolan, late of Kilmore, now of Wail, near Horsham.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 24 May 1915 p 8 Article
The death occurred on Saturday at his residence, Ada-street, Adelaide, of Constable James Hogan, after an illness extending over several months. He was a careful and painstaking officer, and was respected by the whole force. He was born in County Clare on June 18, 1860, and joined the police force on June 1, 1883. For many years he had been doing plain clothes duty, and was a first-class constable by rank.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 24 May 1915 p 6 Article
Mr. James Hogan, a member of the detective force, died at his residence, Ada street, Adelaide, on Saturday, after an illness extending over several months. He joined the constabulary 32 years ago, and for the last 23 years had been a plain clothes constable. He attained first-class rank some years ago. With the exception of a few years spent at Norwood, he was on constant patrol duty in the city. Mr. Hogan was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to South Australia about 35 years ago. "A constable with a good record, who was well liked by all his comrades" was Inspector Burchell's tribute to the deceased's character.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 24 May 1915 p 6 Family Notices
HOGAN.— On the 22nd May, at his residence, Ada street, off Halifax street, James Hogan (police constable), beloved husband of Catherine Hogan, aged 54 years. Requiescat in pace.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 1 June 1915 p 8 Family Notices
JAMES. -May 31, 1915, at her late residence, 124 Princes-street, city, Honora, late of County Clare, Ireland, and dearly loved wife of John James, aged 72. At rest.

Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 - 1954) Saturday 26 June 1915 p 4 Article
Interesting Personality. EX-NAVAL CARPENTER D. MANGAN. RECALLS CARPENTARIA EXPEDI TION.
Doing something to the front doorstep of his private house in Stevedore-street, reminding him of the trade he had followed from boyhood, ex-Naval Carpenter Denis Mangan, was discovered on a recent Monday. A little, old man, bordering upon 8o, he was quickly chatting of reminiscences associated with Williamstown, his early life here and his indirect share in the Burke and Wills ill-fated expedition of 186o. "And you were born, Mr. Mangan?" "At Kilrush, County Clare, Ireland." "By what vessel did you come to Australia?" "By the chooner Harriet, 110 tons, Captain Picken. I acted as second officer and carpenter. We took 168 days; she was one of the old "galliot" build. On arrival, we were taken up the Yarra to discharge. I remember there were only two river pilots-old Captain Liley (dead) was one. All the crew was paid off here except me and the mate. After discharging, the Harriet went into the Geelong trade. This was in 1858. I was about 23 yars old. For a bit I went backwards and forwards in her. In 1859 I came ashore and took work with Dove and Oswald, ship-owners, Nelson place. They had a floating dock moored off Ann-street, What's called "The Gem" now, used to be called "the Comet pier." After the ill-fated Comet, that, like the steamer Citizen, disappeared on the way down with a lot of diggers on board, going to the New Zealand rush. When I left that firm I joined the P. and O. Co.'s service-got carpenter of the R.M.S. Jeddo. Made voyages in her and a couple of others. When that firm took the mail contract, they agreed to burn only English coal, and they had five or six hulks out in the bay here, forming a coal depot for the English supplies. "Then there were only two or three little schooners in the Sydney coal trade. What they used to do was to load up 400 or 500 tons, enough to take them to Sydney and back, so that they had to have a depot of the Clara Symes and other hulks. They made me carpenter of these; wages was 13/- a day. Captain Vander decken (some name like that) had general charge, and Mr. Walters was mate. One of the hulks was the J.D. Dare: she's owned by the Melbourne Steamship Company now-over 1oo years old. She brought a load of women convicts here." "And when did your experiences with the Victorian Navy commence?" "With the H.M.S. Victoria, under Captain Norman, in 1860. About the time of the New Zealand war, and the H.M.S. Pelorus was here, lying off Williamstown. She was ordered to New Zealand, and the Victoria had to attend her as a despatch boat. I never saw a vessel you could do so much with as the Victoria: handy anywhere."
SEARCH FOR BURKE AND WILLS. In order to make clear in a sentence or two why it was that Carpenter Mangan, with Captain Norman and 96 others, went a special trip to the Gulf of Carpentaria in the R.M.S. Victoria, the following may explain: "On the 20th August, 1860, the Burke and Wills expedition, with their camels, left the Royal Park, Melbourne, in the presence of hundreds of people, among whom was the writer. Cooper's Creek was reached on October 19th. R. O'Hara Burke, who was the leader of the expedition, and a martinet, suddenly took it into his head to leave the rest, and with three members of the party-Wills, King and Gray-cross the continent to the Gulf of Carpentaria. In this they succeeded, and returned on their tracks to Cooper's Creek, where all but King (who lived or "nardoo" with the blacks) died. It was to try and catch the party some- where about the Gulf that the Victoria was dispatched to Northern Queensland." Mr. Mangan: "I believe I'm the only one on that Carpentaria trip now alive. How I came to join it was, I was working at the Firefly, that had come down from Brisbane or Rockhampton, and old George Heriot, father of the Mayor, said to me, 'There's a chance for a young fellow like you.' Well, I went up to Melbourne (it was said to be an eighteen months' trip), got examined, passed the doctor, and shipped as carpenter. The Firefly accompanied us, and when the wind wasn't favorable, we used to tow her, because we had both steam and sail, too. At length we got about Torres Straits, and from Sir Charles Hardy's Island got a signal. We wasn't long before we found a barque ashore, called the Lady Kinnard, laden with horses and copper ingots going up to China. The night before, in the dark, we'd lost sight of the Firefly, and, on the other side of the island, discovered her ashore. She had 30 horses on board. Four were dead, but we got the rest out by cutting a hole in her side." The. narrator then went on to explain how the Gulf of Carpentaria was reached, and the re-shipped horses (after the Firefly was patched up and re-floated) were put on shore in charge of Mr. Lansborough, who had gone up with the Victoria. Mr. Mangan told of how the Victoria's boats were put in requisition to pull some 12 or 20 miles up the Albert River, where they had to remain for several weeks at a stretch, with the natives looking down upon them from the trees fringing the bank, strict watches being kept. When the provisions ran out, one boat would return to the Victoria for more, Mr. Mangan's association with the R.M.S. Victoria led him eventually to continue in the Victorian Naval Service, both as carpenter of H.M.S. Nelson and H.M.S. Cerberus, ultimately retiring after 34 years on pension.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 17 July 1915 p 11 Family Notices
RYAN.-In loving memory of Annie Mary Ryan, of Clonakilla House, Ballinacally Ennis and Killard Doonbeg, County Clare, Ireland, who departed this life at the Hospice, Sacred Heart, Darlinghurst, July 17, 1912, aged 26 years. R.I.P.

Albany Advertiser (WA : 1897 - 1950) Wednesday 21 July 1915 p 2 Article
Death of Mrs. Muir, Sen.-The ever thinning ranks of the pioneers of Albany have sustained another loss by the death of Mrs. Mary Muir, who passed away on Sunday night at the grand old age of 90 years. Mrs. Muir had been ailing for some time and her death was not unexpected. The late Mrs. Muir was born in County Clare; Ireland, and arrived in this State in the year 1853, proceeding to Albany In the following year. Shortly after arrival she married the late-Mr. Robert Muir, who predeceased her many years. Mr. and Mrs. Muir then took up their residence at Forest Hill, near Mt. Barker, and developed part of the fine estate now owned and occupied by their son, Mr. Andrew Muir, jun. Leaving Forest Hill, they decided to reside in Albany, and for many years were engaged in general business here. The deceased lady resided in Albany continuously since. The late Mr. R. Muir and one of the deceased's sons, Mr. J. Muir, were prominent figures in the municipal life of Albany, each occupying the Mayoral chair and held seats in the Municipal Council for many years. The deceased lady has left two sons, six daughters, 37 grandchildren, and 11. great grandchildren. The funeral took place yesterday and was very largely attended.

The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) Tuesday 20 July 1915 p 5 Article
The death is recorded of Mr. Peter Sexton, of Watchem. The deceased, who was 87 years of age, had been ailing for some time past. Born at Mullough, County Clare, Ireland, he landed in Australia by the Donald McKay in 1863. He worked in the Western District about Colac and Camperdown after arrival, and then selected land at Birregurra. Leaving Birregurra he went to Goroke and selected, and from there he moved to Morton Plains, 34 years ago, where he engaged in farming very successfully. He retired to Watchem about five years ago.

Warwick Examiner and Times (St. Lucia, Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Monday 19 July 1915 p 1 Article
MOONLIGHTS GAOLER
LINK WITH BUSHRANGING DAYS

The sixties were stirring times in New South Wales and Victoria. The voice of the old fossicker, now an almost extinct species, was heard in the land, and bewhiskered, red shirted bushrangers laid in wait for him in lonely gullies, past which the coach track wound on its way to the nearest town. In those days a policeman often had a life that was by no means all beer and cold-pie. He was at times called upon to face a ride through the bush on the box seat of a coach, which, besides two or three shivering passengers, also carried a few boxes of gold. His chance of getting a few ounces of lead from an old-fashioned, long barrelled revolver was a trifle better than the present-day constable's likelihood of drawing a prize in Tattersall's sweep.

"I thought we were in for a little potting practice the day I saw Thunderbolt riding along the mountain-side, about 150 yards from the coach," declared ex-Gaol Governor John Cotter when recalling the other day some incidents of bygone times. Mr. Cotter was a constable at the time he referred to, and was acting as mail guard on the Glen Innes coach. "We had two passengers," he said, and one of them was a magistrate. Just as we were going up the Devil's Pinch I saw a horseman riding along the side of the ranges, and it didn't need a second glance to assure me it was the notorious Thunderbolt. We had such excellent descriptions of him that there could be no mistake. He had his eye on the coach, too, and seemed to be debating with himself whether to gallop over to us or not. I settled the question for him by drawing my revolver. He saw the action, realised that I had the drop on him, and rode away. The magistrate was greatly perturbed when he saw my revolver come out. He was still more upset when he learned how close he had been to Thunderbolt without the railing of a dock to separate them. The horseman I saw was Thunderbolt all right, because he was present at the Uralla races on the following day, and was on his way there when he passed our coach. Forty-eight hours after wards he was shot by Senior-Con stable Walker,"

Guarding Moonlight.
While on the subject of bushranger. Mr. Cotter called to mind the capture of Captain Moonlight, whose real name was Scott, and his sub sequent execution. It is a generally accepted belief that Moonlight was a well-educated man and claimed descent from a good old English family. Mr. Cotter, who, in the capacity of gaol official, spent a lot of time in the bushranger's society, regards Scott as having been a man who had received an ordinary education, but had missed no opportunity of improving himself. Owing to Moonlight's excitable Temperoament and daring nature great difficulty was experienced by the gaol authorities in getting warders to guard him while he was awaiting execution. Mr. Cotter was brought down from Maitland, and he, with another warder, afterwards took it in turns to watch the desperado while he was in the condemned cell.

"One morning," said Mr. Colter, "Moonlight became outrageous. He was shouting and bawling at the top of his voice, and he had the wits scared out of the warders. Seven of them had to be relieved. At last the deputy-governor came along and he said, 'What the hell's the matter with that fellow Moonlight ? This is the seventh man I have sent to him. Do you think you can manage him ?"
"I said I'd have a try. 'What's up, Scott ?' I asked, as I looked through the grating of the cell door.
"Do you call those men warders?" he said, angrily. 'I call them Johnny Warders. They don't know how to manage a man. All I did was to call out to my mate Rogan, and they started to make a fuss about it.' He promised me he would be quiet, and he was. For a week before he was executed, I and another man stood guard over him. He asked me as a favor to remain with him on the night before his execution, as he said strangers irritated him. The governor asked me if I would take it on, and I told him I was not afraid, "There's only one thing," I said. 'That woman Black going to see him so often. She might drop some poison in the matting.' The governor replied that he could not interfere with the visits of this woman. 'You must just keep your weather eye on her," he said.

? Terrible Night.
Moonlight, got no poison, and he gave no trouble. He spent his last night on earth dictating to a clerk a long account, covering 21 pages of foolscap, of the Egerton bank robbery in Victori,. for which he had been sentenced to five years, and of which he said he was innocent .

"It was a terrible night," proceeded the ex-governor, "but I carried him through. About 2 o'clock in the morning he had a sleep, and covered his head with the bedclothes. I was in a regular fidget, for I didn't know whether he was dead or alive. Rogan, who was in the other condemned cell, asked to be called at 3 a.m. to say some prayers. He was fast asleep at that hour, so we didn't waken him. As a matter of fact, he was always praying.

"Moonlight and Rogan were executed together at 9 o'clock. Ad dressing Rogan, Moonlight remarked, 'Well, Rogan, we made one great mistake. Good-bye, old man.' Moonlight wanted to make a speech, but Rogan stopped him.

During the long career as a police constable, warder, and gaol governor, Mr. Cotter had many exciting experiences with refractory prisoners. On one occasion he frustrated a well-planned attempt to escape by the two desperadoes. Horn and Baxter, who were undergoing sentences of 15 years and 10 years respectively. That was during the late Sir John Cecil Read's term as governor of Darlinghurst Gaol. On another occasion he was nearly knifed by a vicious prisoner named McDonald. It seemed a fateful coincidence that the warder who pacified this man and took him away was after wards killed by another prisoner. Quinlan, a rare desperado, was searched when handed over to the gaol authorities, but a concealed weapon was overlooked. With this he murdered Warder Elliott, and was sentenced to death. He was reprived, and after doing the best part of 14 years, be went to Bega, and murdered a farmer. For this second murder he was executed at Goulburn.

Mr. Cotter was born at Kingston, County Clare, Ireland, and last month celebrated his 73rd anniversary of his birthday. He joined the New South Wales police in 1866, and in 1875 changed over into the Prisons Department, in which branch he served for over 30 years at Bathurst, Berrima, Maitlandnd, Darlingrhurst, Biloela, Mudgee, and Tamworth gaols. He is now living at Bondi (Sydney) in the enjoyment of a pension.—Sunday "Sun."
(Old hands state that Moonlight was on Canning Downs many years ago.)

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Saturday 24 July 1915 p 2 Article
The death occurred yesterday morning of an old and highly respected resident of Camperdown, in the person of Mr Martin Joseph Moran. The deceased gentleman had reached the age of 74 years, and was a native of County Clare, Ireland. He came to Victoria some 55 years ago and for many years had resided in this town, following the occupation of dairy-farmer. He leaves a widow and family of five sons and four daughters. The sons are John, William Patrick, Martin Joseph, David Michael and Francis Peter, and the daughters Mrs O'Brien, and the Misses Margaret Elizabeth, Mary Elizabeth and Bridget Kathleen. The members of the family are well-known and highly-thought of in Camperdown, and many expressions of sympathy have been extended them in their bereavement. The funeral will leave deceased's late residence at 2.30 to-morrow afternoon, for the Camperdown Cemetery. The funeral arrangements are in the hands of Messrs Collie and Brennan.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 14 August 1915 p 8 Article Illustrated
Mr. Patrick Whelan, who died at Kal goorlie, Western Australia, on July 27 last, in the sixty-first year of his age, will be remembered by many residents of Adelaide as a genial Irishman, who made numerous friends. He was born on New Year's Day, 1855, in County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in this province at the age of 21. His occupation was that of a draper, and Messrs. John Martin & Co., Rundle street, employed him as an assistant, and subsequently as a shopwalker, until 1880. He then began a drapery business at Hindley street and Glenelg, and successfully conducted it for several years. He resided at Glanville. On December 19, 1879. Mr. Whelan was appointed a member of the committee formed to raise funds for famine-stricken people of Ireland. He was a founder of the Irish National Land League, and when that organization was suppressed by the Imperial Government he inaugurated the Irish National League. He attended the Irish National Convention, held at Melbourne in 1883, as a delegate from South Australia. For some years after 1881 he was Hon. Secretary to the Irish National Society. In December 1889, Mr. Whelan became Councillor for Hindmarsh Ward in the Adelaide City Council. He was re-elected unopposed. At the expiration of the period he was. prevailed upon to contest an Alderman's seat. He was elected by a majority of 220 votes. During 1894, when Mr. Whelan was about to contest a seat in the Legislative Council, the Chairman (Mr. P. McMahon Glynn) and the hon. treasurers (Messrs. P. Healy and P. J. O'Driscoll) of the Irish national movement; issued a circular calling attention to his zeal in that cause, and inviting subscriptions to a testimonial.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 16 August 1915 p 6 Article
Mrs. Bridget Lorenzo, who died at her residence, Gertrude-street, Port Pirie, on Monday last, was the widow of Mr. N. Lorenzo. She was 58 years of age, was born in County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in Australia with her parents in 1872 by the ship Vincent. After residing in Adelaide for 20 years she removed to Port Wakefield, and then to Port Pirie, where her husband died 12 years ago. Mrs. Lorenzo had a family of 13, eight of whom (three sons and five married daughters) survive.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 20 August 1915 p 11 Article
By the death of Mr. Edward Leo last night; this district has lost another old resident. Born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1837, the de ceased arrived in South Australia in September, 1877, and came to Gladstone, where he resided until his death. He was much respected. A widow, four sons, and three daughters are left.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 26 August 1915 p 5 Article
NAIRNE, August 25.— Mrs. Mary Jones, an old resident of this district, died on Sunday morning at the age 0f 86 years. Deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland, and for seven years re sided in England before sailing for Australia. With her husband she landed at Port Adelaide on Christmas Day, 1856, and has been residing in this locality ever since. Four sons and two daughters survive. Mr. Jones died several years ago.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 13 September 1915 p 11 Article
THE LATE MR. M. O'BRIEN.

GEORGETOWN. September 10. Pioneers are gradually passing away, one of the latest being that fine colonist. Mr. Michael O'Brien, who died at his son's home, Glenelg. Mr. O'Brien was born in county Clare, 89 years ago, and arrived in South Australia in 1846. In 1870 he took up land about a mile from Georgetown, on the Gladstone-road, and by perseverance and industry he made it one of the best farms in the district. Eighteen years ago Mr. O'Brien handed over his property to his sons, Daniel and Michael, Daniel later on purchasing Michael's interests. The late Mr. Michael O'Brien left also three daughters (Mesdames Commane, North Adelaide; Kirby, Georgetown; and Quinn, Western Australia), 20 grandchildren, and ten great- grandchildren.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 16 September 1915 p 3 Article
The death occurred here to-day at her residence, Wood street of Mrs Mary Greiner at the age of 72 years. Deceased, who was born in County Clare came to Queensland in the early sixties by one of the Blackhall ships which brought out so many Queensland pioneers. She settled in Warwick with her husband, who predeceased her eight years ago. Deceased, who was widely known and respected is survived by a family of six-Messrs John Greiner (Boonah) Patrick Greiner (Warwick), William Greiner (Laidley) Arthur Greiner (Brisbane) Joseph Greiner Sydney, and Mrs. Richardson (Brisbane).

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 18 September 1915 p 15 Family Notices
STAFFORD.-In sad but ever loving memory of my dear son and our dearly beloved brother, William Henry Stafford, who died September 5, 1901, aged 33 years. So dearly loved, so sadly missed. Inserted by his loving father, Francis Stafford, and also his loving sister and brother-in-law, Florence and Osborne Taylor.

STAFFORD.-In sad but loving memory of my dear wife and our dear mother, Bridget Stafford, native Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, who departed this life September 19, 1907, aged 68 years. Inserted by her loving husband, Francis Stafford, also daughter and son-in-law, Florence and Osborne Taylor. May God have mercy on her soul.

STAFFORD.-In sad and sorrowful memory of our dear mother and grandma, Bridget Stafford, who departed this life, at Lewisham Hospital, on September 19, 1907, aged 68 years. Also our dear brother and uncle, William Henry Stafford, who died at Rozelle. September 5, 1901 aged 33 years. Dearly loved and, oh, so sadly missed.
Inserted by her sorrowing daughter and son-in-law, and his ever-loving sister and brother-in-law, Harriet and Alick Orknie. Never forgotten by her sad granddaughters and his ever-loving nieces, Mary, Florrie, and Maggie Orknie. R.I.P.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 27 September 1915 p 8 Article
EUREKA STOCKADE.
THE LAST OF THE STATE PRISONERS.
Ballarat, September 26.
Mr. Michael Tuohy. the last of the State prisoners who stood their trial in the Criminal Court at Melbourne in connection with the revolt at Eureka Stockade on Sunday morning, December 3, 1854, died at Ballarat Hospital yesterday from pneumonia and senile decay He was a widower, 85 years of age He arrived in Sydney from County Clare, Ireland, in 1847.

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954) Wednesday 29 September 1915 p 4 Article
EUREKA STOCKADE REVOLT.
DEATH OF MICHAEL TUOHY.
Michael Tuohy, the last of the State prisoners who stood their trial in the Criminal Court at Melbourne in connection with the revolt at the Eureka Stockade on Sunday morning, December 3, 1854 died at the Ballarat Hospital on Friday last from pneumonia and
senile decay (says the Ballarat correspondent of "The Age"). The deceased pioneer, who was a widower, 85 years of age, arrived in Sydney from County Clare, Ireland, in 1847. In the early fifties he reached Ballarat and worked on the Eureka, and other diggings. Trouble subsequently arose on the field in respect to the licenses of the diggers, who determined on armed resistance against constituted authority, under the leadership of Peter Lalor. About 40 of the insurgents were killed in the fight with the British troops at the stockade, while Captain Wise, of the 40th Regiment, and five privates belonging to the Imperial forces lost their lives in the combat. Tuohy and 12 other diggers who fought with him inside the stockade were captured by the troops and all- were taken to Melbourne and arraigned on charges of high treason. The prisoners were gratuitously defended by. Messrs. R. D. Ireland and B. C. Aspinall, eminent criminal counsel, and all were acquitted. Tuohy, after the trials, continued his search for gold at the Ballarat and other diggings in Victoria, but in later years he followed the rushes in New Zealand. He met with success, and on settling down to farming pursuits in the Ballan district he was worth about £10.000. While he was awaiting trial in 1854-55 a party of adventurers jumped his rich claim on the Eureka, and on his acquittal he spent a good deal of money in an unsuccessful endeavor to eject them. For many years. Tuohy. who was almost blind, resided on a small farm abutting on the Daylesford-road, which was recently destroyed by fire. The remains of the old digger, who leaves one son. were interred in the Ballan Cemetery on Monday.

The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918) Monday 27 September 1915 p 2 Article
The funeral of the late Mrs Catherine Roach, whose death was announced in our last issue, took place on Friday afternoon, and was well attended. Deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and was a colonist of over 60 years, the greater portion of which was spent in Colac. The body was laid to rest in the Colac cemetery, the bearers being:-Messrs J. Malone, E. Malone. A. Embrey, and G. Cooper; the pall was supported by Messrs A. O'Dowd, J. Paatsch, T. M'Grath, J. Embrey, M. M'Mahon Joe. M'Mahon, J. Vesey, Mat. M'Mahon, W.E. Bartlett and R. Clarke. The service at the graveside was conducted by the Rev. Father Daly, and the funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. Geo. James.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 29 September 1915 p 6 Family Notices
HOWARD - KINDREGAN -On August 25, at St. Mary's R.C. Church, South Brisbane, by the Very Reverend Father Derrigan, assisted by Father Jordan, Patrick (fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. James Howard, of County Clare, Ireland), of Gympie, to Ellie (third daughter of the late Senior Sergeant Kindregan and Mrs. Kindregan, " Eskdale," Vulture-street West, South Brisbane).

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Tuesday 28 September 1915 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 2 Family Notices
THE LATE MRS. B. CRAMER. The funeral of the late Mrs. Bridget Cramer, relict of the late Mr. Albert Cramer, of Waroona, took place on Saturday morning in the presence of a large gathering of relations and friends. The deceased lady, who was 75 years of age was born at County Clare, Ireland, but had resided in Victoria for 47 years, and in this State for the past 10 years. Mrs. Cramer leaves a grown-up family of five sons and six daughters to mourn their loss. The cortege moved from the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, where a Requiem Mass was celebrated by His Grace Archbishop Clune, and proceeded to the Roman Catholic portion of the Karrakatta cemetery, where the remains were laid to rest, the last rites being conducted by the Rev. Father P. Masterson. The chief mourners were: Mrs. R. Bell and Miss M. Cramer (daughters), Mr. J. Cramer (son), Mr. R. Bell (son-in-law), Master Robert Bell (grand-son), Mr. and Mrs. J. Webb, Mrs. A. Falk, Mrs. A. M'Donald, and Mrs. A. Wilson. The pall-bearers were: Messrs. J. Healy, A. B. Bell, R. F. Smythe, J. Wall, F. W. Chambers, and J. H. Staimes. Numerous handsome wreaths and floral tributes were placed on the grave, and a large number of letters and telegrams of condolence were received by the bereaved family. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 2 October 1915 p 8 Article
The death occurred at Millicent last Friday of Mrs. Ann Crowe, wife of Mr. John Crowe, of Poolna. She had been ailing for two years, and her death was not unexpected. Mrs. Crowe was born in County Clare, Ireland, 73 years ago, and she emigrated to Australia in 1863. Over half a century of her life was spent in the south east of the province. She was married twice. Her first husband, the late Mr. Thomas O'Connell, was a well known resident of the Millicent district 30 years ago. There is one son-Mr. P. O'Connell, of Millicent. Mrs. Crowe married again in 1890.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 15 October 1915 p 8 Family Notices
KEADY.-On the 19th September, at her late residence, Port-road, Bowden, Margaret, relict of Patrick Keady. Colonist of 59 years. Native of County Clare, Ireland. R.I.P.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 21 October 1915 p 11 Article
The death occurred this morning of Mr Daniel Corbett, aged 70 years, who was one of the oldest residents in the Nanango district (our Nanango correspondent wired last night). He came to Brisbane from County Clare, Ireland, In the ship Earl of Russell, in 1864, and was engaged successively at Mount Brisbane, Barambah, Tarong, and Nanango stations, when those properties were owned by Mr. Geo. Clapperton. He left the management of the last-named station to enter on a butchering business in Nanango 38 years ago, and continued in that occupation practically to the time of his death. He leaves a widow, six daughters, and four sons. The deceased was for many years a member of the Nanango Shire Council, a member of the Hospital Committee and trustees, and a committeeman of St. George's Roman Catholic Church, and a member of the Hibernian Society.

The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld : 1875 - 1929) Saturday 23 October 1915 p 17 Family Notices
QUINN.— At the Rockhampton Hospital, on the 4th October, 1915, Martin, the dearly beloved husband of Mary Ellen Quinn, late of Cairns, and Mount Morgan, and youngest son of Mrs. M. Neylan Quinn, of County Clare, Ireland. Deeply regretted. May the compassionate Lord Jesus grant him rest in peace. May the perpetual light shine, May he rest in peace.
(Northern, Southern and home papers please copy.) (Inserted by Mary Ellen Quinn.)

Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954) Monday 15 November 1915 p 4 Article
MID-RICHMOND PIONEER'S
DEATH.
Mr. James O'Brien, of Lismore, was informed by an urgent telegram from Sydney yesterday of the death of his father, Mr. Thomas O'Brien, who was for over fifty years a resident of East Wardell. Mr. O'Brien had reached the age of 81 years, and for eight years had resided with his wife and one daughter and one son at Rooty Hill, Sydney. Death was due to an attack of pneumonia which he contracted a short time ago. The deceased gentle man was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia as a youth. His first experiences of the North Coast were gained on the Clarence, where he resided for over a year, whereupon he selected at East Wardell, where he permanently settled, and was married shortly afterwards. He possessed all the hardihood which characterised the finest stamp of pioneer, and was thus enabled to combat the many difficulties that beset the path of those who came to the Richmond in the early days. Until sugar growing was taken up he engaged in the cultivation of corn, but later went in extensively for sugar, while, upon the advent of ????ing to the rivers he soon became interested in it, and about sixteen ... .'- 'i;.' la a..,llii.-.I llM'l ai r,- at Meerschaum Vale 1'i.r Mi- ¡.,ii|",-. Although he [Illegible]

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 18 November 1915 p 4 Article
Mr. Michael Kearse, who died at Wallaroo on Sunday, at the age of 91, was a much-respected resident of the town (writes our local correspondent). He was born in County Clare (Ireland), and came to South Australia in the ship Henry Moore 63 years ago. In 1860 he was married at Kapunda, and from that time on wards resided in Wallaroo, where, with Mrs. Kearse, he was active in the early development of the port. Mrs. Kearse died about five years ago. For some years Mr. Kearse worked for the old Wallaroo and Moonta Tramway Company, and later at the smelting works as tally clerk. From this position he retired about 20 years ago. In conjunction with Mr. Thomas Davies and the late Messrs. T. R. Heath, A. F. Taylor, R. Haselgroye, and E. C. Bird, he was instrumental in getting Wallaroo declared a corporate town, and he served for a term as a Councillor for West Ward. He was a member of the Foresters' Lodge, and of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church. The surviving members of the family are Mesdames W. Bollmeyer and P. OLoughlin (Wallaroo), Mrs. F. Colly (Western Australia), and Mrs. McDonald (Adelaide). There are six grandchildren.

The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate (NSW : 1892 - 1927) Friday 19 November 1915 p 4 Article
DEATH OF MRS. P. CARBERRY.
Mrs. P. Carberry, for over 30 years a resident of Goolma, and relict of the late Mr. P. Carberry, died in the Gulgong District Hospital. She was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia when 18 years of age. For many years prior to settling in Goolma
deceased resided at McDonald's Creek with her sister, Mrs. Halloran, of Mudgee. The following children are left to mourn:-Mr. W. J. Carberry (Goolma), Mr. D. Carberry (Dubbo), Mrs. E. Cassidy (Sydney), and Mrs. G. Symons (Cadia). The remains were interred in the Catholic portion of the local general cemetery. The Rev. Father O'Reilly officiated at the graveside.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 4 December 1915 p 15 Article
The death took place on Wednesday (writes our Maryborough representative) of Mrs. Margaret O'Gorman, who had resided in Maryborough for the past 31 years. The deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and came out to Queensland by the ship Baraclough. She leaves a family of three sons and two daughters-Messrs. Frank (Cloncurry), Nicholas (Kingaroy), and Daniel (Cairns), Mesdames W. Franks (Pialba) and B. Weibler (Gayndah).

Warwick Examiner and Times (St. Lucia, Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Saturday 4 December 1915 p 4 Article
MR. SIMON BROWN.
It is with deep regret we announce the death of Mr. Simon Brown, of Tannymorel, which sad event took place at the Warwick General Hospital early yesterday morning. Deceased, who had reached the ripe old age of 77 years, had been ill for only a few days, and the end was due to general break-up. Born in County Clare, Ireland, the late Mr. Brown came out to Queensland about 31 years ago, and during practically the whole of that time he followed farming pursuits at Tannymorel. He was of a quiet, retiring disposition, and was highly esteemed by all who came in contact with him. Mr. Brown never married, but is survived by six brothers, and one sister. Of the former Messrs. James and Edward Brown reside at Tannymorel, while the other four brothers, who have been 65 years in Queensland, are dispersed over the State. His only sister is Mrs John Green, of Tannnymorel. We extend our sympathy to the sorrowing relatives.
The funeral is announced to leave the Imperial Hotel, Warwick, at 11 o'clock to-day for St. Mary's Church and thence to the Warwick cemetery.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) Saturday 4 December 1915 p 11 Article
TOONGABBIE.
DEATH OF MRS. SHANNON.
Mrs. Margaret Shannon (80) passed away on Sunday. Her funeral moved to the R.C. Cemetery, Rookwood on Monday, the funeral arrangements being in the hands of Messrs. Wm. Metcalfe and Co. The deceased was the widow of the late Mr. James Shannon, orchardist of Model Farm, and she had been 49 years in New South Wales. Mrs. Shannon was a native of County Clare, Ireland.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Tuesday 14 December 1915 p 8 Article
A Tragically Sudden Death.
The Railway Department reported yesterday morning that Mr. Michael O'Malley, a resident of Church-street, Toowong, who was standing on the railway platform at Coolangatta that morning with his daughter, awaiting the train to convey him to Brisbane, suddenly dropped dead. He is stated to have been suffering from a weak heart. The late Mr. O'Malley, who was 73 years of age, was an ex-member of the public service in Queensland, and was well known and much respected through- out the State. He was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and came to Queensland when about 20 years of age. His first position was that of a clerk in Ipswich in the office of Mr. Macalister, who was subsequently Premier of Queensland. Mr. O'Malley afterwards entered the public service, and was for several years C.P.S. at Ipswich. During his tenure of office there Senior Inspector Geraghty and Sub-inspector O'Brien, of Brisbane, were stationed at Ipswich. From Ipswich Mr. O'Malley went North, and held the offices of Police Magistrate and Sheriff of the Supreme Court. Later he was appointed a member of the Civil Service Board, and had as his fellow commissioners Captain Townley and Mr. Thomas Mylne. He acted in this capacity till the dissolution of the board, when he retired from active service. The deceased gentleman resided at Toowong for many years, and was a member of the local Bowling Club. His wife predeceased him some years ago, but he is survived by a family of sons and daughters. One of the sons is a solicitor at Innisfail, another is a grazier at Taroom, and a third is a banker. One of the daughters, Mrs. Brown, is the wife of a Government official at Dunwich, The other daughters are unmarried, and reside at home.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 16 December 1915 p 4 Article
On Wednesday evening Mr. Thomas Farrell, a gentleman who for many years filled important positions in the South Australian Civil Service, died at Glenelg, after a short illness. Mr. Farrell was born on May 7, 1842, in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Port Adelaide with his parents, where he landed in October, 1847. On September 22, 1864, he entered the mounted police force, which was at that time under the command of the late. Major Warburton. Subsequently he served under the late Commissioners Hamilton and Peterewald. Mr. Farrell remained in the police force for a period of 17 years and was stationed successively at Overland Corner, on the River Murray, Mount Barker, Morphett Vale, Nairne, and Tanunda. From the latter station he was called in to the office of the Commissioner of Police, where he acted as clerk for four years. In 1881, on the promotion of the late Mr. G. H. Ayliffe to the position of Secretary to the Central Board of Health, Mr. Farrell was appointed Chief Inspector to the Board. This was in 1893. He held that appointment under the late Drs. Gosse and Whittell respectively. The initial work of carrying out the provisions of the Factories Act of 1895 devolved upon Mr. Farrell, who was appointed Inspector of Factories on February 20, 1895. On the retirement of the late Mr. John Howell, as keeper of the Adelaide Gaol, deceased was, on December 15, 1896, promoted to that position, which he retained for eight and a half years, and on June 29, 1904, he received the appointment of Superintendent of the Yatala Labour Prison, which position he held until May, 1912, when he re tired from the public service, and settled at Glenelg. On November 13, 1912, he was presented with the Medal of the Imperial Service Order as a recognition by the Imperial Government of his long and faithful service. On his retirement he was made the recipient by the officers of the department of an illuminated address, bearing testimony to the high estimation in which le was held. Mr. Farrell has left a widow, two sons — Mr. H. G. Farrell, claims officer in the Tramways Trust; and Mr. L. P. Farrell, who has enlisted for service abroad, and who is now in camp — one daughter —Mrs. J. Chivell, of Black Forest —and six grandchildren. The late Mr. Farrell was for 68 years in the State, and was 73 years of age at the time of his death.

Brunswick & Coburg leader (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Friday 7 January 1916 p 2 Family Notices
Brown (nee McMahon).-On 25th Dec., at her residence, No. 6 Gardiner st., West Brunswick, Bridget, wife of Bartholomew Brown, a native of New market and Ferguson, county Clare, Ireland.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 12 January 1916 p 6 Article
The death is announced of Mr. James Byrne, of Warooka. He was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1839, and came to South Australia in the ship Sultana in August, 1850, with his parents, who settled in the city until the goldfields in Victoria broke out. Mr. Byrne, then a lad, and his father proceeded thither, but their luck was not good. Eventually they decided to come back to South Australia and take up land. A block was selected at Sheaoak Log, and later they removed to Saddle- worth. By this time Mr. Byrne had reached manhood, and he entered into the road-carting business with a bullock team, his route being principally between Port Adelaide and Burra. In 1871 he went to Warooka, where he had taken up new country. He remained there until his death. He was a man of upright character, whose word was his bond, and he will be sincerely regretted by a host of friends in all walks of life. He left a widow, five sons, six daughters, and several grand- children.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 19 January 1916 p 6 Article Illustrated
Our Nhill correspondent writes:-The death of Mr. John Patrick Manning, a well-known identity of this district has occurred at the age of 90 years. He was born in 1817 in County Clare. In 1848 he left Ireland with his two brothers for the United States, where he found employment in foundries. In 1854, with his brothers, he left America, and he landed in Port Adelaide the same year. The trio eventually selected land at Saddleworth and began farming. Thirteen years later the partnership was dissolved, when Mr. J. P. Manning settled at Yorke Peninsula, where he remained for 16 years. In 1884 he came overland and settled in the Nhill district and was engaged in farming until 1887, when he retired. He left two sons, both of whom reside at Murrayville; and three daughters, who reside near Nhill. 25 grandchildren, and 20 great-grand-children.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 22 January 1916 p 16 Family Notices
QUIGLEY. -January 21, 1916, at 10 Birchgrove-avenue, Balmain, Margaret, widow of the late Hugh Quigley, and third daughter of the late Denis Kenna, of County Clare, Ireland. R.I.P.

The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld : 1875 - 1929) Saturday 29 January 1916 p 40 Article
The other death is that of an old identity in the person of Mr. M. Walsh, who was sixty two years of age at the time of his demise. Mr. Walsh was born in County Clare, Ire land, in 1833 and must have come out to Queensland at an early age. Nearly up to the time of his death Mr. Walsh had been employed in the woolscouring works. He was a member of the Hibernians for over twenty years, and a number of the brethren attended the funeral on Friday afternoon, the Rev. J. Plormel officiating. He leaves a widow and son and daughter.

The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Monday 31 January 1916 p 1 Family Notices
TORPY. -On 29th January, 1916, at his late residence, Snug River, Michael, the dearly beloved husband of Julia Teresa Torpy, in the 81st year of his age. R.I.P. (A native of County Clare, Ireland, and an old and respected resident of this district of many years standing. Home and New Zealand papers please copy.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 2 February 1916 p 4 Article
The death has occurred at Nhill, Victoria, of Mrs. Bridget Manning, wife of the late Mr. J. P. Manning (who pre-deceased her by only a week), at the age of 86 years. She had been in, indifferent health for 12 months, and had been mostly con fined to her bed. The deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1839 [sic]; and arrived at Port Adelaide in 1853, with her parents. She was married in 1855, at Kapunda. Twenty-five grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren survive.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 10 February 1916 p 6 Article
Mr. John O'Loughlin, an old colonist, late of Kadina and Arno Bay, who was born in county Clare, Ireland, died on Sunday at the residence of his son-in-law Mr. J. H. Scarce, at Colton. Mr. O'Loughlin left a grown-up family.

The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 12 February 1916 p 15 Article
A very old resident of the town and district, Mrs. Bridget O'Hare, passed away at her residence, Tooley-street, on Fri day (writes our Maryborough representative). The deceased lady, who was a native of County Clare, Ireland, arrived in Queensland 49 years ago, and had since resided in Maryborough. Her husband predeceased her by some eight years. She is survived by six sons and five daughters.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Tuesday 7 March 1916 p 11 Article
Mr. Patrick Scanlan, the well known cab proprietor, late of the Supreme Court stand, died in a private hospital a few weeks ago after a residence of 53 years in Queensland. He arrived in Brisbane in the year 1863 in the sailing ship Norman Morrisey, and entered the service of Mr Rawnsley, of Winton, Government Surveyor, with whom he stayed seven years, in the days when camping in the bush was more dangerous than at present. Among his experiences he witnessed many native corroborees and strange features and customs of black life. Subsequently the late Mr. Scanlan took up pig and dairy farming at Sampson Vale, disposing of the same to advantage, and started a grocery business in Paddington, but commercial exigencies compelled him to sell out and adopt the calling of a cab proprietor, in which his cheery temper and civility made him a general favourite. His wife pre deceased him four years ago, and his family of two sons and three daughters (to whom he was a good and loving father) are all marred and doing well in the state. He saw 53 Christmas Days in Queensland, and, though never forgetting his birthplace in County Clare Ireland, he always spoke well of Queensland and the many advantages it offered to the industrious Mr. Michael Scanlan, of Vine- street Bulimba, is a brother of the deceased.

Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Saturday 18 March 1916 p 13 Article
The late Mrs, Mary Evans, of Kapunda, was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and on the death of her first husband came to South Australia 34 years ago to reside with her uncle and, aunt (Mr. and Mrs. Brodie), who were old residents of Ross Creek, near Kapunda. A few years later she married the late Mr. M. Evans, who carried on farming in the same district for many years. Mr. Evans died nine years ago, and she had been in ill-health for the last three years. She died at the age of 75 years.

Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Tuesday 4 April 1916 Edition: DAILY. p 5 Article
The death of Mr. M. F. Neylon, which occurred at Highview, Jolimont, at the age of 84, on Friday last, removed a very old and successful colonist and a well-known and respected resident of the Western district. A native of County Clare Ireland. He arrived in Geelong in 1850, at the age of 18. He was one of the first on the Ballarat goldfields, and witnessed the Eureka riots, and took an active part in endeavoring to arrange a peaceful settlement. In 1862 he took up land at Beeac, now known as the Stonyhurst Estate. In 1865 le acquire the Blackrock property at Camperdown, and in 1874 he purchased the Commercial Hotel in Camperdown, which he conducted until 1890, when he sold out and returned to Stonyhurst, where he remained until two years ago, when, owing to failing health, he came to Melbourne to live. He had a very jovial temperament and charitable disposition. There survive him his widow, five sons and four daughters. The youngest son, Dr. Michael Neylon, is a captain in the R.A.M.C., at present "somewhere" in France.

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Tuesday 4 April 1916 p 3 Article
The Late Mr. M. F. Neylon.
A WORTHY PIONEER.

The death of Mr M. F. Neylon, which took place at "Highview," Jolimont, on 31st March, removes a very old colonist and a well-known resident of the Western District. Born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1832, he left for Australia in 1849, landing at Geelong early in 1850. He was amongst the very first on the Ballarat goldfields, afterwards going to the "rushes" at Castlemaine, Bendigo and the Ovens, at all of which places he met with more or less success. In 1862 he took up the Stonyhurst Estate, near Beeac, where he resided for some years, in 1865 he acquired the Black Rock property, a few miles from Camperdown and in 1874 he purchased some properties in the township itself, amongst them being the Commercial Hotel, which he conducted as a flourishing concern for a number of years. During this period be made further purchases of land, this time in the neighborhood of Cobden. About 25 years ago he returned to Stonyhurst, in the management of which he took an active part until about two years ago, when the infirmities of advancing years compelled him to retire. He had passed through some stirring times, and until comparatively recently was a man of boundless energy. He was at all times a plucky investor and always had great confidence in the future of Australia. He was one of the original shareholders in the Geelong to Melbourne railway, was amongst the first to support export of frozen meat and later the manufacture of butter on co-operative principle, he was fond of sport in all its forms, particularly horseracing. and bred and raced horses as far back as the fifties; and although he never managed to get hold of anything really first-class, he won numerous races throughout the Western District where his colours were very popular. Amongst the horses he raced 20 years ago were Emancipation, Plebian, and Shandon, very successful performers, and latterly Highview carried his colors with a fair amount of success, this horse being trained by a very old friend of the late Mr Neylon, in Mr Harry Harrison. Having acquired wealth he did not overlook his responsibilities and was a generous supporter of charitable institutions. He was a life member of the Camperdown Mechanics' Institute, in consideration of financial aid given. He was also a trustee of the local showground and materially assisted in inducing the society to take up its present excellent site. He was always an ardent supporter of the Camperdown Turf Club and in the distant past, when that institution was not in such a flourishing condition as now, the deceased gentleman was always ready to dip his hand in his pocket to clear off its debt. He was a keen student of men and affairs and knew the history of almost every civilised nation. He leaves a widow, three daughters and five sons to mourn their loss.

The surviving members of the family are Messrs John Neylon (Malvera), P. T. Neylon, of Black Rock (Camperdown), F. Neylon (Stonyhurst), C H. Neylon (Shire Engineer, Foot scray) and Dr L. L. Neylon (at present in a military hospital in England, and who has recently been made a Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps). The daughters are Mrs A. C. Mickle (Camperdown), Mrs W. J. Toohey (Sandringham) and Miss Neylon ("Highview," Jolimont). Two of the grandsons (Lieut. C. A. Mickle and Bombardier Neylon) are on active service, the latter being in France at present. The body was brought to Camperdown by the mid-day train yesterday and was later laid to rest in the R.C. portion of the Camperdown cemetery, the Rev. Father Ryan reading the burial service. The funeral was a very large one and included many prominent residents of the town and district. Numerous wreaths covered the coffin, including one from the President and Councillors of the Heytesbury Shire. The coffin was borne to the grave by four of the late Mr Neylon's employees, all of whom had been in his employ for 20 years or over. They were Messrs C. Pope, A Sangster, J. Grant and H. Greenbank. The pall-bearers were Messrs Jas. Gillie, H. Harrison, J. Dwyer, G. Chamberlain, W. T. Manifold, Geo. Armstrong, H. G. Stansmore, Donald M'Donald, W. O. Read, Campbell M'Arthur, and J. J. Burns (of Geelong). The mortuary arrangements were in charge of Mr King, of Melbourne and Messrs Collie and Brennan had charge of the funeral arrangements. As a mark of respect to the late Mr Neylon, the Hampden Shire Council yesterday adjourned its meeting for a time.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 11 April 1916 p 4 Article
Mr. James O'Dwyer, an old colonist, died at his residence, Hackham, on Sunday. He was 83 years of age, and was the only son of the late Mr. and Mrs. James O'Dwyer, of county Clare. He was a colonist of 62 years, having arrived at Port Adelaide in the ship Grantirana in 1854. He first worked on a farm at Morphett Vale, owned by Mr. Lloyd. When he married he took up land on his own account and farmed for 21 years. Then he took the Crown Hotel at Reynella, and afterwards the Flagstaff Hotel, at Darlington, where he remained for a number of years. He was one of the oldest Odd-fellows in South Australia. He had been living a retired life at Hackham for about 10 years prior to his death. He left one son (Mr. J. J. O'Dwyer, of Seaton Park) and one daughter (Miss O'Dwyer, of Hackham).

The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 15 April 1916 p 15 Article
The death took place at her residence, in Wallace-street, of Mrs. Mary Downey, wife of Mr. K. Downey, both old and respected residents of the town (our Warwick correspondent advised on April 4). Mrs. Downey was born in County Clare 65 years ago, and had been about 40 years in Queensland. She was much esteemed among a wide circle of friends. She is survived by two sons and a daughter. The members of the H.A.C.B. Society attended the funeral, and the last sad rites were performed by Rev. Father Potter.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 15 April 1916 p 8 Family Notices
O'SULLIVAN .-On the 9th April, at Kapunda, late of Hansborough, Cornelius, beloved husband of B. O'Sullivan, in his 69th year. R.I.P. Born Innis, County Clare, Ireland. Home papers please copy.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 27 April 1916 p 9 Article
The death took place at her residence in Freestone on Tuesday of Mrs. Bridget Leahy, widow of the late Mr. Thomas Leahy (our Warwick correspondent ad vised yesterday). Deceased, who had reached the age of 94 years, was born in County Clare, Ireland. She came to Queensland 54 years ago and had resided in the Freestone district for the past 45 years. The funeral took place this afternoon to the Warwick cemetery.

The Ararat advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Saturday 6 May 1916 p 3 Article
MRS P. THORNTON. Old residents of the district will learn with much sorrow of the demise of Mrs Thornton, relict of the late Patrick Thornton, Glenview, Tatyoon. The deceased lady, who had reached the extreme age of 86 years, was one of the oldest, if not the oldest, residents of the Tatyoon district, and she was highly esteemed by all who, had the pleasure of knowing her. She was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came out to Victoria with her brother and came to this district in 1859, and was married at Beaufort in 1862. For all that long space of years Mrs Thornton resided continuously at Tatyoon, until a month or two ago, when she went to Northcote on a visit to her married daughter, Mrs Hill, and she died there on Thursday last. Mrs Thornton leaves a family of two sons, Messrs T. P. and S. J. Thornton, of Tatyoon, and two daughters, Mrs Hill, of Northcote, and Sister Mary Mercy of the Geelong Convent. The remains of the deceased were brought to Ararat last night by train for interment in the family grave in the Tatyoon Cemetery, and the funeral will leave Mr Tom Thornton's residence at one o'clock this afternoon.

The Ararat advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 11 May 1916 p 2 Article
MR L. FREEMAN. A well known and very old resident of Ararat in the person of Mr Lawrence Freeman passed away at about six o'clock on Tuesday morning at his late residence, off Grano street, at the age of seventy-four years. The deceased was a native of Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in Australia at the time the gold rushes were attracting people from all parts of the world, in the early fifties. For a time he worked with Mr Langford, the Government surveyor, and afterwards visited the different goldfields. He then went to New Zealand, and eventually returned to Victoria and settled down at Ararat, where he was married and reared his family. The deceased followed the calling of a contractor, and was well known throughout the whole of the shire. For some time past he had practically lived a retired life, being advised by his medical adviser to take complete rest on account of suffering from an affection of the heart. On Monday night he retired to bed as usual, but at the hour mentioned on Tuesday morning it was found that he had passed away. Deceased leaves to mourn their loss a widow, one son and five daughters, for whom the deepest sympathy is expressed. The funeral will take place this afternoon, when the cortege will move from his late residence for the Ararat Cemetery, at three o'clock.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 3 June 1916 p 14 Family Notices
HOGAN-On the 27th May at the residence of his daughters, at Jamestown, Cornelius Hogan, late of Corifin, County Clare, Ireland, aged 70 years. R.I.P.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 17 June 1916 p 13 Family Notices
MANGAN.—On the 16th June, at his residence, "Tasma," Curson street, North Melbourne, Denis Mangan, eldest son of the late Patrick Mangan, shipwright, Kilrush, county Clare, Ireland, the beloved brother of Thomas Mangan, J.P., Cootamundra, N.S.W., Patrick, Warragul, Mrs. C. Brown, Williamstown, and the late Stephen, Arthur, Michael, Ellen, and Mrs. Doyle. R.I.P.

MANGAN.—On the 16th June, at his residence, "Tasma," Curson street, North Melbourne, Denis, the beloved husband of Catherine Mangan, late of Stevedore street, Williamstown, formerly W.O. Victorian Navy, loved father of Patrick, Michael, Thomas, Lillie, Edith, Mrs. J. S. Seymour, and Mrs. E. Davidson. R.I.P. (No flowers, by request.)

SHEEHAN.—On the 9th June, at his residence, 117 Cobden street, South Melbourne, Michael Sheehan, native of County Clare, Ireland. A colonist of 64 years. (Interred privately, 10th June, Melbourne General Cemetery.) Requiescat in pace.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 22 June 1916 p 6 Family Notices
DIAMOND WEDDING.
QUINLIVAN—RYAN. —On the 22nd June, 1856, at their present residence, Dry Creek, by the Rev. Father Pall(?)her, Daniel, eldest son of the late John Quinlivan, to Johanna, youngest daughter of the late Thomas Ryan, both of County Clare, Ireland.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 23 June 1916 p 7 Article Illustrated
Sub-Inspector Patrick O'Connor, who has been raised from the rank of sergeant, has
been in charge of the North Adelaide police-station since December, 1907. He was born at Laughgrany, county Clare, Ireland, on March 17, 1855, and arrived at Port Adelaide on November 5, 1874. He joined the force in October, 1875.

Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 - 1954) Saturday 24 June 1916 p 2 Article
EARLY EXPLORATION RECALLED THE LAST OF THE SEACHERS. AT the Williamstown necropolis last Sunday a large assemblage was gathered about the grave of a very old resident. The remains were those of Mr Dennis Mangan, ex naval carpenter of Australia's first man o' war, R.M.S. Victoria, at that period commanded by Captain H. Norman, for many years a local resident. Deceased was 79 years of age. Among the mourners were Mr C. E. Norman, chairman of the Railways Commissioners, and second son of the respected navigator. The Rev Father Gellie officiated at the graveside. The pall bearers were Messrs A. Fowler, H. E. Forbes, J. Webster, H. Jenkins, R Paton and R. Vaughan. The late Mr Mangan had been for the past twelve months resident at North Melbourne, and leaves a grown-up family. Mr T. Lonsdale had charge of the mortuary arrangements. Deceased was a native of Kilruth, County Clare, Ireland, where he was born in 1837. He was a ship carpenter by trade and went to sea at a very early age. Mr Mangan came out in the schooner Harriet, the voyage taking 168 days. The Harriet was of 110 tons burthen. The voyage was completed about the same period as that accomplished by the late Mr James Lillington, another ship-carpenter, in-a 45-ton brig. In 1860 he joined the H.M.S. Victoria, which acted as dispatch boat to the flagship during the New Zealand war. It was to seek to effect the rescue of the Burke and Wills Expedition that the R.M.S. Victoria, that Carpenter Mangan and 96 others, proceeded to the Gulf of Carpentaria Of that company Mr. Mangan was probably the sole survivor. Altogether the deceased was connected with the Victorian naval service for 84 years. After leaving the Victoria, he was carpenter of both the H.M.S. Nelson and H.M.S. Cerberus.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 30 June 1916 p 6 Article
Mr. John McColive, one of the oldest and most highly respected farmers of the north, died at his residence, Quorn, on June 24. He first took Up farming in the district 32 years ago, and was in the business, at the time of his death. He was born in County Clare in 1852 and came to South Australia in 1862. He, with his parents, resided at Pinkerton. From there he went to Appila-Yarrowie, then to Willochra for a number of years, and finally he settled in Quorn. His bright and cheerful disposition gained for him the respect of all. He will be greatly missed by the Roman Catholic Church. He was of a generous disposition, and those who went to him for assistance never came away empty-handed. He left a widow, three sons, and four daughters. His eldest son, Sergeant W. McColive, after being invalided home, returned to the front.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Saturday 8 July 1916 p 4 Article
MILLICENT.
July 6.
The funeral of the late Mr. M. Malone was held yesterday (Wednesday) in the Mayurra Cemetery. There was a large gathering, testifying in a marked manner the respect in which the deceased was held. The Rev. Father Gatzmeyer conducted the services at the graveside. The late Mr. Malone was an old and highly respected resident of the district since 1879, when he came here with his family, having secured a section (104) of land on the Hatherleigh main road, in the Sebastopol district, where he resided up to the time of his death. Although he did not take a priminent part in public matters he was a man whose opinion was much respected. He was widely known and highly respected for his manly and straightforward conduct, and his warm-heartedness and kindly disposition, and will be missed by a large circle of friends. He followed farming, in which he was most successful. Between seasons he carried out several large road contracts for the Mount Muirhead Council, in which he gave satisfaction. When the leasing system was introduced in the
State he secured two sections under that Act, in the Avenue district, and extended his operations to sheep farming, in which he was successful. He was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and came to the State in 1857. He resided at Mount Barker for some time where he was married. He then came to Mount Gambier, residing there and at Glenburnie. As already stated, he came here in 1879 with his family. He leaves a family of three sons, Messrs. C., M. J., and I. Malone, and one daughter. His wife predeceased him in 1899, and a daughter in 1903. He was in his 85th year.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 10 July 1916 p 6 Family Notices
HILL.-On the 19th June at his residence. Todd street, Kapunda, Hughbert John Hill, beloved husband of .Margaret Hill, aged 86 years. A native of County Clare. Ireland. R.I.P.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 11 July 1916 p 8 Family Notices
LUCAS.–July 6, 1916, at Ryde, Mary M. Lucas, beloved mother of Mr. Joseph Lucas, of Katoomba, Avoca-street, Randwick, aged 73 years. A native of Tulla, County Clare, Ireland. Clare and Charleston, S. Carolina, U S.A., papers please copy.

Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954) Saturday 15 July 1916 p 4 Article
His many friends will regret to hear of the death of Mr. John Egan, which took place in the Cairns Hospital last Tuesday, morning from pneumonia. Deceased, who was only 40 years of age was a native of County Clare, Ireland. He leaves a widow and five young children to mourn their loss.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 17 July 1916 p 8 Family Notices
RYAN -In loving memory of Annie Mary Ryan, Clonakilla House, Ballinacally, Ennis and Killard, Doonbeg, County Clare Ireland, who departed this life at The Hospice, sacred Heart, Darlinghurst, Sydney, July 17, 1912, aged 26 years. R.I.P.

Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Monday 17 July 1916 Edition: EVENING. p 2 Article
MRS BRIDGET O'BRIEN. There died at Port Fairy North on Saturday morning last, an old and highly respected resident of the borough, in the person of Mrs Bridget O'Brien. The deceased lady, who had reached the very ripe age of 81 years, was a native of County Clare, Ireland.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 4 August 1916 p 6 Family Notices
COFFEY. -On the 5th March, of senile decay, Honora, the dearly-beloved wife of the late John Coffey, and only surviving child of the late Patrick and Mary Mahoney, of Kapunda, native County Clare, Ireland, aged 76. Colonist 67 years. R.I.P.

COFFEY. -On the 29th July, at Wright-court, of bronchitis, with heart failure through bronchitis, John, the dearly-beloved husband of the above, and eldest son of the late Patrick and Catherine Coffey, of Kapunda, native County Clare, Ireland, aged 75. Colonist 67 years. R.I.P.

The McIvor Times and Rodney Advertiser (Heathcote, Vic. : 1863 - 1918) Thursday 10 August
Mr Martin Toohey, of "Glencora,” East Glenhope, passed away in Nurse Thomson's private hospital, Kyneton, on Wednesday. Mr Toohey had been ailing for five months past, and on Monday was brought into Kyneton
. His condition, however, became worse, and he passed away as stated. Mr Toohey was 69 years of age, and was about 17 years of age when his father brought his family from County Clare, Ireland, to Victoria, 52 years ago. His father settled in this district and for a number of years carried on farming at Green Hill. He died about 26 years ago, having reached the great age of 103 years. The late Mr Martin Toohey was married about 50 years ago in St. Mary's, by the late dean Geoghegan. His wife survives him, but there is no family. For a time after he set out for himself in life, Mr Toohey leased a farm from the late Mr Martin M'Kenna, in Kyneton district. Then he settled at Glenhope East, and 29 years ago, having disposed of portion of his holding, he went to Kyneton and for a couple of years carried on the business of the Shire Arms Hotel, High street. Then he returned to the remaining portion of his estate, and continued there until his death. Mr Toohey was much respected and esteemed by all who knew him, for his upright character and kindly generous disposition. The deepest sympathy is felt on all sides for his bereaved wife.

Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Tuesday 15 August 1916 p 3 Article
A FATAL FALL
CORONER'S INQUIRY.
The death of a man named Francis Claffey, as the result of a fall in the yard of the Agricultural Hotel on Saturday last, formed the subject of an inquiry by Mr D. M'Dougall (District Coroner) at the Courthouse yesterday afternoon. Constable Rankin deposed that on Saturday afternoon, about 12.30, he received a telephone call from Mr Janson, and proceeded to his hotel in Munro-street. In a room at the hotel witness saw the body of deceased. He was shown some steps leading to the forage room of the hotel stable; the steps were fairly steep, and between 10 and 11 feet in height, from ground to top; there was no hand rail. Witness was shown a depression in the ground alongside the steps. Examined the body of deceased and saw a mark on the left forehead; ascertained that deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland; that he was 64 years of age, and unmarried. He was said to have a brother, a blacksmith, on the Richmond River.

Dr. Bowman deposed that he was called at 12.45 on Saturday to Janson's Hotel, and there saw the body of a man on a bed; was told his name was Francis Claffey; he looked to be over 60 years of age; he was quite dead, and the body still warm. On examination found a cut and bruise on the forehead, and the neck was dislocated between first and second vertebrae. There were no other marks or injuries. Concluded that deceased met his death from a dislocated neck, the result, witness heard, of a fall. A fall of six or seven feet would cause the injury described. He saw the steps but did not think them at all dangerous; they would be better with a hand-rail. Daniel Barry, laborer, of Jerry 's Plains, stated that he was at Janson's Hotel on Saturday about noon. He knew deceased as the groom at the hotel; saw him coming down the steps at the stable carrying a kerosene tin full of horse feed. When about six feet from the ground he seemed to fall straight forward off the steps to the ground. Deceased did not moan or move, but his mouth moved. Helped remove him in to the room. Deceased was dead when witness went to him. No one was near deceased when he fell. Witness noticed the mark on the ground. Deceased was perfectly sober when witness saw him earlier that day.

Thomas lrwin Janson, licensee of the Agricultural Hotel, deposed that he had known deceased for about 7 years, and he had been in his employ as groom, for the past six weeks. He was told of the accident, and saw deceased lying by the steps in the yard. Saw that, he was seriously injured, but did not know he was dead. Removed him to a bedroom, and rang up the doctor and the police. The steps were wide and sloping, with a 10-inch tread. When he saw deceased an hour before he was quite sober and doing his work. Deceased was buried at witness' expense. The Coroner found that deceased died from injuries accidentally received by a fall, which broke his neck; no, blame was attachable to any person for the fatality.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 18 August 1916 p 6 Family Notices
QUIGLEY. -August 17, 1916, at her residence, 158 Albany-road, Stanmore, Bidelia, dearly loved wife of Owen Quigley, late of Annandale, second daughter of the late Thomas Lett Morony, of Mill Town, Malbay, County Clare, Ireland. By request, no flowers.

Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 - 1954) Saturday 19 August 1916 p 2 Article
OBITUARY. MRS ANN JONES, of 10 Walker street, New port, who died on Sunday, August 6, was a colonist of 70 years. Born in County Clare, Ireland, she came to Australia a girl 10 years of age, and went to Ballarat in the fifties during the gold discoveries at Ballarat East, and was at the Eureka Stockade during the exciting times with her husband, the late Mr Edward Jones. During the time the Duke of Edinburgh came to Ballarat, also the two young princes (the present king, His Majesty King George, and his brother), she was at their receptions with her sister, the late Mrs Daniel Brophy. Deceased leaves two sons and a daughter to mourn her loss.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 12 September 1916 p 4 Article
Mr. Patrick Caughlin died on September 6 at the residence of his son-in-law (Mr. J. J. Dowd), of the Elliston Hotel, and was buried in the Catholic Cemetery at Colton. His wife predeceased him about four years ago. The late Mr. Caughlin, who was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1828, came to Australia about 60 years ago. In his younger days he was employed by the late Mr. John Young, father of our present Agent-General. About 44 years ago he married Mrs. Kate Farrell, a daughter of the late Mr. Patrick Grace, of Shea oak Log. Mr. and Mrs. Caughlin lived on the old farm for about seven years, and, like many others, moved to the north, and settled close to Johnsburg, where they had their share of bad seasons. In the 28 years they had 18 failures with their crops. Mr. and Mrs. Caughlin sold their farm in 1906, and went to reside with Mr. Dowd. The deceased was a typical Irish man, of a most cheerful disposition, and all children were passionately fond of him. He owned and bred some of the best stock, and was a first-class judge.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 12 September 1916 p 6 Article
The death occurred last week of Mr. Patrick Caughlin at the residence of his stepson-in-law (Mr. J. J. Dowd), Elliston Hotel. He was born in county Clare, Ireland, 88 years ago, and had been in Australia for nearly 60 years. In his younger days he was employed by Mr. John Young, the father of the present Agent-General. He married Mrs. Kate Farrell, a daughter of the late Patrick Grace, of Sheaoak Log, about 44 years ago and she died four years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Caughlin lived on their farm for about seven years, and then moved to the north, settling close to Johnsburgh. They sold their farm about 10 years ago, and went to reside at Elliston with Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dowd.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Wednesday 13 September 1916 p 2 Article
OBITUARY.
MR. THOMAS KERIN.

Mr. Thomas Kerin, the well-known Mount Gambier East farmer, who died on September 5, at his residence, O.B, Flat, and whose death was announced in the "Watch" of the 6th last, had an active and successful life. He was a native of County Clare, Ireland, where he was born 74 years ago, and his early activities were connected with the soil. He left Ireland for Australia with his father and three brothers in November, 1864, in the ship Matilda Atheline, and reached Port Adelaide in February of 1865, which made him a colonist of 51 years. They worked at Mount Barker for twelve months, and in 1867 he and his brothers Patrick, Michael, and John, drove a team of bullocks overland to Mount Gambier, and bought from the Crown a good farm at Carter and Broadribb's old station, beyond Yahl. They were accompanied by their father and mother and sister. After two years pioneering Mr. Thomas Kerin's brothers disposed of the farm to him, and left for Victoria, where they took up land. Mr. T. Kerin, who was not afraid of hard labor, and plenty of it, continued the pioneering work which had been begun. The hardest part of it was clearing off the timber. The country was covered with a dense forest of several kinds of trees, which prevented one seeing further than 60 or 70 yards. The first year they were there they managed to clear 25 acres. He succeeded in due course, and made money. Some years afterwards he purchased a block of land near Yahl, from Mr. C. Blume, and transferred his home there, in order to be near a school, for the benefit of his family. In 1890 he shifted back to the old station, but did not remain long, and returned to Yahl, where he and his family resided for about 10 years. Some 12 years ago, on the first subdivision of the Moorak Estate, he purchased a splendid block on the eastern side of the Port MacDonnell road, a little over four miles from Mount Gambier. He erected a fine residence upon it, and made it his home for the rest of his life. His latest land purchase was a block of 80 acres at Yahl from Mr. E. Norman. Mr. Kerin was for many years a member of the Agricultural and Horticultural Society, and also a committeeman. He was a member of the committee of St. Paul's Church for a good many years, and was a member of the St. Laurence O'Tool's Branch of the H.A.C.B.S. from its foundation. Mr. Kerin was a keen sportsman, and for some years ran horses at several of the smaller meetings in the district. The first race Mr. Harry Hopwood, the well known Mount Gambier rider, won in his life was at a picnic meeting at Allandale, on Mr. Kerin's Little Harry, which was bred by the owner. Lady Clare, a racing mare of local note, was also bred by him. The late Mr. Pat Kenny used, when a lad, to ride for him.

West Gippsland Gazette (Warragul, Vic. : 1898 - 1930) Tuesday 26 September 1916 Edition: MORNING. p 6 Article
"Mud Oven" WESTERN SOLDIER-COOK. FRIENDS THOUGHT HE WAS DEAD. Forbes, Saturday. On the military records his name is given as John Walsh, No. 4192, 1st Field Artillery. To his friends in the west he is "Mud Oven," one of the champion cooks who delight the hearts of shearers in the sheds out back. I found him at Lynch's Hotel at Forbes, and sought to interview him, but it was a hard task. There appeared no chance of getting him to sit for a photo. "No," said "Mud Oven," "that's no good to me, What would the fellows in Egypt think of me when they saw I had been advertising my photo in the papers? They'd think I was a coot."

Incidentally it was learned that "Mud Oven" was a native of Ennis, County Clare, Ireland. He saw a lot of service in the British navy, where he served for twelve years. He was a gunner, and holds first-class certificates. Part of his time in the navy was served under Sir Harry Rawson, who at the time was in command of the St. George. The late Sir Harry was afterwards Governor of New South Wales, and "Mud Oven" ran across his old commander one fine day at Condobolin, during one of His Excellency's country tours. The old sailor-Governor recognised, his former gunner and shook him warmly by the hand. Gunner Walsh has lost three brothers on the west front, and a fourth, who remained in the navy, went down with one of the fighting ships in that grim battle in the North Sea. The cook, sheds tears when he thinks of his brave brothers, but somehow it strikes one they are tears of pride as well as sorrow. "How did you come to take the war game on?" a bystander asked. "It was this way," said "Mud Oven." "I had just finished up cooking at Mr. C. H. Edol's Mulgutherie station two years ago, and somehow I got hold of a paper which described the British retreat at Mons, I think it was. That was enough for me. These lads must want more assistance or they would never go back like that, I said to myself. I was making across country at the time, and when the call came I was near Quirlndi, so up I went to the recruiting depot and enlisted. "What followed in camp and in Egypt is not of much consequence. Gallipoli was hell, though. I was in the first landing there, and lasted so long that I thought I was going to come right through without a scratch. Bob Bing, a Forbes soldier, was with me part of the time. Bob got clean through without getting a wound, and now he is doing good work in France. I do not know how people got it into their heads that I was dead. So far as I know I only wrote one letter from the trenches, in which I forwarded Matt Lynch £3 I owed him. Is that right, Matt?" "Quite correct," said Mr. Lynch. "Well, I was on active service for one year and 103 days, or altogether, counting camp and Egypt, my term of service was one year 277 days. You can see my discharge, which shows. 'Conduct. good.'

"'They tell me it was shrapnel got me. One pellet went through my neck, and would have settled me only I am pretty tough. Another big slug got me on the stomach, and put me to sleep for a while. The doctors and nurses at the hospitals did great work, and many an Australian soldier owes his life to these heroes and heroines. To finish up my yarn, I was invalided back to Australia, and received my discharge last month. When I came west and started to single out old friends they got great surprises. They all thought I was dead. It had got about that I was killed in action early, so their surprise was pardonable. Anyhow, I am fit and well, and will beat the roll call at Warroo shed, a few miles away from here, next week. I have an idea I will be the cook at Warroo this shearing." Mulgutherie, the last station "Mud Oven" cooked at before enlisting, is a portion of Big Burrawang, and is Mr. C. H. Edol's portion of the old station. In days gone by Big Burrawang was the biggest shed out-back, having pens for over a hundred shearers. The present Prime Minister of Australia should remember Burrawang, for he made a success of an organising tour there about 25 years ago, after his memorable tour of Forbes district and the west. The shearers responded so liberally that Mr. Hughes was enabled to return to Sydney, and a couple of months later he won a seat in the State House. The above, of course, has nothing to do with "Mud Oven," but it serves to show that the big station in Forbes district has helped to pave the way to success of the Prime Minister. "Mud Oven," cook, good union man, and soldier, has done his bit. He does not want it advertised, though. One of the most modest men the writer has ever tried to get a story from is this man. His friends about Forbes have been giving him a great reception, but "Mud Oven" does not like flattery. He would sooner be left alone. One can appreciate such feeling, and to find it is quite refreshing, especially to the newspaper man. "Try and get the lads, and every one else, to vote for compulsory service," were "Mud Oven's" parting words. "There are many in Australia to-day who are badly wanted in the firing-line, and they should be given a chance of doing their bit. Good luck to the brave lads who are in khaki now, in Flanders and Egypt, keeping up the good name of Sunny Australia."-Sydney "Sun."

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Friday 29 September 1916 p 1 Family Notices
HOWARD.-On the 27th September, at Morwell, Patrick Howard, the beloved husband of Jane, the beloved father of Mrs. Biggar (Hillston, N.S.W.), James (Kalgoorlie, W.A.), and John (Morwell). native of County Clare, Ireland, aged 71 years. R.I.P.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Monday 2 October 1916 p 1 Family Notices
O'CONNOR.—On the 30th September, at his residence, No. 57 Glenferrie road, Glenferrie, Patrick Ambrose, the dearly beloved husband of Katie C. O'Connor. A native of Kilshanny, County Clare, Ireland. Late of Carlton and Adelaide, aged 74 years. Adelaide papers please copy. Rest in peace.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Friday 13 October 1916 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 3 Family Notices
THE LATE MRS. B. A. RYAN. The funeral of the late Mrs. Bridget pes Ryan, wife of Mr. Roger Ryan,

of Hamel, South -Western railway, took place on Monday last, and was attended by a large number of relatives and friends. The deceased lady was born in County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in, Australia 34 years ago, the latter 20 years of which were spent in this State. She leaves a husband, three sons and two daughters to mourn their loss. The cortage moved from the residence of her son, Mr. C. J. Ryan, 33 Edward-street, East Perth, and proceeded to the Roman Catholic portion of the Karrakatta cemetery, where the remains were interred. The Rev. Father P. Masterson conducted the last rites. The chief mourners were: Mr. Roger T. Ryan (husband), Messrs. C. J. and R. J. Ryan (sons). Misses Mary and Kathleen (daughters), Mr. and Mrs. Higgins, Mrs. and Miss Maggie M'Mahon, and J. and M. M'Mahon (cousins). The pall-bearers were: Messrs. J. Lahey, C. Sheridan, J. Doherty, and W. Montgomery. Among those present were: Messrs. J. Jeweller (Hamel), D. Hayes, J. Ahern, Mesdames, Watson, Clarke, O'Rourke (Hamel), Linskey, Lahey, and Miss J. Clingin. Numerous wreaths, floral, tributes, letters, and telegrams of sympathy were received by the bereaved family. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea.

The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Saturday 14 October 1916 p 1 Family Notices
MILLER. -On October 10, 1916, at South Perth, Western Australia, Anastasia Miller, relict of the late John Heny Riggs Miller, of Toonagh, County Clare, Ireland, and deeply loved mother of J. Massy Miller, Mrs. Eileen M. Lawler, Kathleen and Isobel Miller, of South Perth, Mary and Mesie Miller of Chatswood, Sydney, and Thomas H. Miller of New York, U.S.A. May perpetual light shine upon her gentle soul, O Lord!

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Monday 16 October 1916 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 2 Family Notices
OBITUARY. THE LATE MRS. A. MILLER. The funeral of the late Mrs. Anastasia Miller, of 'Mardie,' Suburban road, South Perth, took place on Thursday morning, and was well at tended. The deceased lady, who was 52 years of age, was born at County Clare, Ireland, but had resided in New South Wales for 18 years, and came to this State a year ago. She leaves two sons and five daughters to mourn their loss. The cortege moved from the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, where a Requiem Mass was celebrated by the Rev. Father D. R. W. Pace, and proceeded to the Roman Catholic portion of the Karrakatta Cemetery, where the remains were laid to rest, the last rites being conducted by the Rev. Father Pace. The chief mourners were Mr. J. M. Miller (son), Mrs. T. J. Lawlor and Miss Kathleen Miller (daughters), and Mr. T. J. Lawlor (son-in-law). The pall-bearers were Messrs. Barrington Waters, W. A. Robbins, W. H. Marcus, H. M'Crae, H. B. Erskine and W. Hansen. Numerous handsome wreaths and floral tributes were placed on the grave and a large number of letters and telegrams of condolence were received by the bereaved family. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Friday 20 October 1916 p 5 Article
The deaths at the Dunwich Benevolent Asylum during last week were :-Michael Casey, age 72 years, native of County Clare, Ireland ; Thomas Ford, age 72 years, native of Galway, Ireland.

The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Wednesday 8 November 1916 p 7 Family Notices
OBITUARY. MR. HENRY BROCKMAN. Another member of the old pioneer families who have left their mark in the history of Western Australia passed away on Monday night, when Mr. Henry Brockman died at his residence in South Perth after a brief illness. The late Mr. Brockman was the son of Mr. W. L. Brockman, who was one of the settlers in this State in 1829. Mr. Henry Brockman was born in Western Australia in 1845, and was therefore 71 years of age at the time of his decease. He was educated in England, and on coming of age followed pastoral pursuits. He owned the Cheriton properties at Gingin, and was one of the principal graziers in Western Australia for many years, being a prominent exhibitor at the annual shows conducted by the Royal Agricultural Society. He was a former member of the State Legislature, representing the Swan district from 1887, through the subsequent change of the Constitution, to 1893, when he retired from active political life. In connection with the building of the Midland railway line and the concession obtained from the State. Mr. John Bateman, sen., of Fremantle, and the deceased gentleman supported the concession as guarantors, and enabled it to be financed. During the last three or four years Mr. Brockman resided in South Perth. In 1874 he married Annie Louisa de Burgh, who also belonged to one of the early pioneering families. The daughter of Robert de Burgh, formerly of County Clare, Ireland, she was a direct descendant of Hubert de Burgh, who went over to England at the time of the Norman conquest. Mrs. Brockman survives her husband, who leaves a grown-up family of three sons and three daughters, most of whom are engaged in various enterprises in different parts of Australasia. A wide circle of relatives—including the Surveyor General (Mr. F. S. Brockman), who is a nephew—is left to mourn the death of Mr. Brockman. The funeral will take place in the Anglican portion of the Karrakatta Cemetery this afternoon.

The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Saturday 25 November 1916 Edition: DAILY. p 4 Article
After an illness extending over some time Mr. Michael Greene, farmer, of Millbrook, passed away at an early hour on Monday morning last. Death was not unexpected, as for the last 15 months he had been a constant sufferer following on a paralytic stroke. The deceased was confined to his bed for some time, and had the attention of Dr Corry, and a trained nurse was engaged to give the close care necessary. The late Mr. Greene had reached the advanced age of 83 years. He was born near the town of Innis Diamond, in County Clare, Ireland, and came out as a young man to Victoria in the early fifties. The deceased was a widower, his wife having predeceased him some 27 years ago (in the year 1889). at the early age of 49 years. This year was one of great affliction to the Greene family, for in addition to the mother, two sons, James and Michael, succumbed after very brief illness. Another son, John, died in 1891, and a year later a daughter, Nellie, known in religion as Sister Mary Ignatius, passed away at the Sisters of Mercy Convent, Ballarat East. [Ellen Greene, born 1 July 1871, to parents Michael Green and Catherine Fitzpatrick, entered convent 3 March 1891, died 25 February 1895. - moh] The late Mr. Greene had one brother, Mr James Greene, of Millbrook, and two sisters, Mrs Thos. Donnellan, of Millbrook, and Mrs. John Connellan, of Morton Plains, Watchem, all three being dead. There is a family of three sons and three daughters. The sons are Thomas, of Speed (Victoria), Patrick and Frank, of Millbrook, and the daughters, Mrs. Thomas Walsh, of Leigh Creek; Mrs F.J. M'Guigan, of Millbrook; and Nurse Maggie Greene, of Melbourne. The remains of the deceased were conveyed on Wednesday morning to St. Patrick's Church, Gordon, where the office of the dead was celebrated at 11 o'clock by the Rev. Father Murray, assisted by the Rev. Father Brophy, of Bungaree. At about 12 o'clock the funeral, which was largely attended, moved to the Gordon Cemetery, being preceded by the Rev. Fathers Murray and Brophy. Then came the hearse, drawn by four horses, followed by three mourning carriages and nearly 100 vehicles. The coffin-bearers were Messrs. Patrick and Frank Greene (sons), Harry and J. M'Guigan, and M. and T. Walsh (grandsons); and the pall-bearers were Messrs Bat Cahir (Lal Lal), J. Delaney. John Sullivan, P. F. Sullivan, John Maher, S. Carey, Thos. Walsh, Tim Carey, C. O'Brien, Jas. Lyons, M. Shanahan, T. Clifford. P. Shelley, M. Neville, (secretary Wallace Butter Factory). T. and P. Connellan (Watchem), nephews of the deceased; W. Britt, Wm. Looby, T. Hanrahan, Thos. Leonard, Jno. Davey, C. Eyre (Eyres Bros, ironmongers, Ballarat), J. Hussey (manager Ballarat Butter Factory). T. Gleeson (Clarendon), T. M. Ryan (Green Hill), Wm.White (Lyons and White), Thomas Ryan and T. Thyne (South Egerton). The last rites of the church were recited at the grave by the Rev. Father Murray, assisted by Father Brophy, and the funeral arrangements were entrusted to Messrs Steve Wellington and Son.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Saturday 9 December 1916 p 3 Article
OBITUARY.
MRS. JAMES GURRY.
Our obituary column contains the announcement of the death, on Wednesday, of Mrs. Susan Bridget Gurry, wife of Mr. James Gurry, the well known farmer of Glenburnie. The deceased, who was in her 81st year, had been for several months in weak health, but the immediate cause of her death was heart failure. Mrs. Gurry (nee Brown) was born in County Clare, Ireland, on January 29, 1835, and came to Port Adelaide in June, 1855. She was married to Mr. Gurry, at Kapunda, in July 1862, and came to Mount Gambier with her husband and family about 47 years ago. Most of the time she lived at Glenburnie, where she was much esteemed by her neighbours. She leaves her husband and two sons-- Messrs. Richard J. Gurry and George T. Gurry--all of whom reside at Glenburnie. The funeral was held yesterday. The Very Rev. Dean Ryan conducted the funeral obsequies, and Mr. G. Lewis carried out the funeral arrangements. There was a large attendance at the funeral.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) Saturday 16 December 1916 p 12 Article
By the death of Mr. Michael Stack, of 'Glandine.' Bettington-rd., Dundas, which event occurred on Monday, the district lost another very old and popular orchardist. The deceased gentleman settled in this district nearly 50 years ago, and at the time of his death, in his 80th year, was nearly the oldest member of the A.lf.C. Guild. His sons (Ted and Jack) were both popular in the district, the former, who is manager of the Goulburn-street branch of the Government Savings Bank, being a good cricketer who played for St. Joseph's College and for Parramatta. His nephews, too, Jack and A. G. Fraser, were amongst the best Sydney footballers. The deceased was a quiet reserved man, but was very popular amongst his neighbours. Most of those who were here when he settled down to orchard work predeceased him. He was a native of County Clare, Ireland. The funeral took place on Tuesday. Those who paid their last respects were Messrs. E. J. and J. J. Stack (sons), Tom Earls (cousin), A. G. Fraser, G. T. Stack and Frank Lenehan (nephews), Basil Conroy and Reg. Wilson (grand nephews); Messrs. J. H. Davies (secretary), G. B. Henderson (Inspector), J. E. Guyot (Parramatta), R. J. Brookes (Moore street), of the Government Savings Bank; Inspector W. Johnstone (Railway Department), Messrs. M. Malone, J. and A. Arkins and W. Pate (Dundas), T. Tunks (Carlingford). J. Ryan (Croydon), and John M. Kelly (Hurstvllle).

Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Monday 18 December 1916 Edition: EVENING p 2 Article
Mr THOMAS McALLEN. In the person, of Mr Thomas McAllen, who died at his late residence, Polding-street, Port Fairy, at 8 o'clock last. Saturday night, there passed away a colonist of 53 years. Deceased, who had reached the advanced age of 80 years, was a native of County Clare.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Tuesday 19 December 1916 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 6 Family Notices
THE LATE MR. DANIEL McMAHON. The funeral of the late Mr. Daniel M'Mahon, of 62 Clarence-street, Highgate Hill, took place on Tuesday afternoon, and was largely attended. The deceased, who was 64 years of age, was born at County Clare, Ireland, but had resided in Australia for 51 years. The cortege moved from Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea's private mortuary in Pier-street, and proceeded to the Roman Catholic portion of the Karrakatta Cemetery, where the remains were interred, the last rites being con ducted by the Rev. Father O'Neill. The chief mourners were Mrs. C. O. Elliott (sister). Mr. C.O. Elliott (brother-in-law), Misses D. and L. Elliott (nieces), and Mrs. S. Fisher. The pall-bearers were: Messrs. J. Keating T. Bogue, J. Stayt, and C. O'Dwyer. Wreaths, floral tributes, letters and messages of sympathy were received from numerous friends. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 30 December 1916 p 6 Family Notices
ROGERS - O'CONNOR. -On the 18th November, at the Priory, North Adelaide, by the Rev. Father Chandler, OP., J. G. Rogers, of Prospect, to Maria, second daughter of the late James O'Connor, of Loughgraney, County Clare, Ireland.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 22 January 1917 p 6 Article
The death occurred on Friday at the North Adelaide private hospital of Mr. Malachy McMahon, of West Hindmarsh. The deceased, who was 63 years of age was born at county Clare, Ireland, and arrived in South Australia about 40 years ago. For the past 30 years he had been in the service of the Government, latterly at the Islington Workshops, and was on four months' leave at the time of his death His wife predeceased him by four years. He left seven sons:-Plainclothes-Constable M. J. McMahon, of Eastwood; Mr. Patrick McMahon, of Welland; Mr. John McMahon, of Maylands; Mr. George McMahon, of Adelaide; Mr. James McMahon, who is now at the front; and Mr. Thomas McMahon, a returned solider; and two daughters, Mesdames M. Knowles and A. Colbert, of West Hindmarsh.

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Tuesday 23 January 1917 p 4 Article
After an illness extending over a lengthy period, Mr. John King, of Lovely Banks, Mortlake, passed away on Thursday evening. Deceased had been ailing from heart troubles, and a few weeks ago took a very bad turn. He rallied, however, but since the beginning of the New Year his condition became very critical and the hot spell of the last few days considerably affected him. The late Mr. King was well and widely known throughout the Western District for the past half century, and was highly respected. He was born in County Clare, Ireland in 1847, and came to this State when a young man, and for the greater part of his life in his adopted country followed farming pursuits. He was a practical tiller of the soil and the beautiful property he possessed was evidence of the up-to date methods that are so necessary to ensure success. A grown-up family are left to mourn their sad loss.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Wednesday 24 January 1917 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 2 Family Notices
THE LATE REV. FATHER MEAGHER. The death of the Rev. Father Martin Meagher occurred at the hospital of St John of God, Subiaco, on Friday last after a long illness. The deceased priest, who was 74 years of age, was born at County Clare, Ireland. He came to this State seven years ago, and proceeded to Geraldton, where he ministered for five years. The funeral took place on Saturday morning. A requiem mass was celebrated by Monsignor P. Verling, V.G., at St Joseph's Church Subiaco, at which there was present a number of the clergy. After the mass the cortege proceeded to the Karrakatta Cemetery, where the remains were interred, the last rites being conducted by Monsignor P. Verling, V.G. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 2 February 1917 p 6 Article
The late Mr. Michael Clancey, of Pekina, was 78 years of age. He was born in County Clare and arrived in South Australia about 50 years ago. He went to live at Hamilton and was there employed as a road contractor. He next moved to Tarcowie, where he followed farming pursuits for a few years, and removed to Pekina, where he lived till just prior to his death. He was engaged in farming and grazing for about 34 years in Pekina, of which place he was one of the oldest and most highly respected residents. He left nine sons (one of whom is on active service) and three daughters.

Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Saturday 10 February 1917 p 4 Article
DEATH OF AN OLD RESIDENT.
The death occurred yesterday morning at 5 o'clock of Mrs Margaret M'Crowe, at the residence of her son in-law (Mr E. Bird), Boundary-street. The deceased was 86 years of age, a native of County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in Australia about 66 years ago. For the greater part of that time she had lived in the Singleton district, and was an old and respected resident. Her husband predeceased her about 15 years ago, and she leaves a family of two sons and three daughters. The youngest son (John) is at present on active service in France. The funeral will take place at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 21 February 1917 p 8 Article
BISHOPRIC OF SANDHURST.
Dean McCarthy Appointed.
The announcement is made that Dean McCarthy, of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne, has been appointed Bishop of Sandhurst, in succession to the late Dr. Reville. Dean McCarthy has been for upwards of 30 years in the Roman Catholic ministry, and during that, time has filled with credit a number of important posts. For about a quarter of a century he has been private secretary to Archbishop Carr, his predecessor in that position being Father Stevens, who had performed such duties since Dr. Carr's arrival in Victoria in 1887. In addition to being dean of the Cathedral, Dean McCarthy has been vicar-general and chancellor of the archdiocese of Melbourne. His occupancy of the position of dean dates from a few years back, when he succeeded Dean Phelan on the latter's elevation to the Bishopric of Sale. Prior to that he had been parish priest at Clifton Hill for a number of years. He was also for a considerable time inspector of Catholic schools.
A native of County Clare, Ireland, Dean McCarthy in the land of his adoption has won the love and respect of both clergy and laity. His fairness and justice are gene- rally acknowledged, and these traits, together with other of his personal qualities, have endeared him to the entire Catholic community. His appointment as Bishop of Sandhurst will be very popular.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 24 February 1917 p 13 Family Notices
CONSIDINE.-On the 18th February, at his residence, Victoria Park, Daylesford, Joseph, relict of late Mary Considine, aged 87 years (native of County Clare, Ireland). R.I.P.

The Ararat advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Tuesday 27 February 1917 Edition: tri-weekly p 2 Article
MR. P. O'LOUGHLAN. The death occurred at Eurambeen on Saturday of Mr Patrick O'Loughlan, a highly respected resident of the district for over 50 years. Deceased was 84 years of age, and had been in ill health for a long time, the cause of death being senile decay. He was born, in County Clare, Ireland, and when he first came to Victoria, was a carter. He afterwards took up land and followed agriculture up to the time of his death. The late Mr O'Loughlan was married 44 years ago, and leaves a widow and grown, up family of six sons and two daughters.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 17 March 1917 p 12 Family Notices
NORMOYLE-SHERIDAN. -February 3, at St. Thomas's Church, Lewisham, by Rev. Father Phelan, Michael, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Normoyle, of County Clare, Ireland, to Catherine, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Sheridan, of Lewisham.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 24 March 1917 p 8 Article
Mrs. Honora Sexton, who died at the residence of her son, Mr. P. J. Sexton, near Blyth, on March 19, was born in County Clare, Ireland, 87 years ago, and arrived in South Australia in 1856, by the Lord Thunderford. She was the widow of the late Mr. Daniel Sexton, of Caltowie, who died 20 years ago. She has left four sons and one daughter— Messrs. Patrick (Blyth), Thomas (Adelaide), Daniel and John (Caltowie), and-Mrs. Sheridan (Adelaide). There, are also 32 grand children and five great-grandchildren.

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954) Wednesday 28 March 1917 p 2 Article
Mr. Jeremiah ("Darby") Casey, who died in the Broken Hill and District Hospital on March 22, from injuries received in a fall, was born in Lochvast, county Clare, Ireland, in 1831, and arrived in Adelaide by the Omega in 1857. He married Miss Mary Anne O'Brien in 1858. There was a family of 11, of whom five survive, namely Mrs. P. J. Hughes, senr., Mrs. Edmund Fitzgerald, senr., Mr. John Casey Mrs. K. D. Clark, and Mrs. W. H. P. Hickey. Mr. Casey settled at Morphett Vale until 1859. Then he received an engagement as foreman in the Kapunda mines. There he took an interest in local affairs. He became a sergeant in the volunteer forces, and was a member of the guard of honor at the landing of Sir Dominick Daley. After leaving Kapunda he started farming at Black Springs, and later went to Manoora, where he remained for about 12 years. In about 1880 he removed to Gumbowie and took up land there for grazing and farming purposes. Owing to bad seasons, however, he engaged with his son in the carrying trade at Broken Hill before the railway was built. He carted the first load of ore from the North mine to the railway goods shed. He brought his family up to the Hill and settled down at the Accacia. engaging in dairying and grazing until about 1905, when he retired. Mr. Casey left a family of five, also 20 grandchildren and 33 great-grand, children.

Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 29 March 1917 Edition: DAILY. p 2 Family Notices
SHEEHAN. -On 27th inst., at his residence, "Rock View," Cororooke (formerly of Koroit), James, beloved husband of Ellen Sheehan; native of County Clare, Ire- land, aged 81 years. R.I.P. (The funeral will leave the Illowa Railway Station This Day, on arrival of the afternoon train from Colac, for the Tower Hill Cemetery). WILKINS & BRENNAIN, Undertakers, Koroit.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Saturday 7 April 1917 p 9 Article
THE INVENTION OF THE SUBMARINE
Two weeks after the outbreak of war in Europe, and one month before the first British ships were sunk by a Herman submarine, there, died in Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A., the man
whose life work resulted in the evolution of a workable submarine from a clumsy idea. Than the perfection of a deadly under-seas craft John Holland, born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1842, had no other passion— save one. That one was that Ireland should have autonomy. These two passions supplemented each other. As long as England remained mistress of the seas Holland saw no hope for an Irish republic. It is said that 40 years ago, when Holland first undertook the rather sizeable contract of destroyed the British navy with an under-water boat which stuck in the mud, with an engine as irresponsible as a hypochondriac and a hull that leaked, he furnished the humorous journalists of the world with more and better material than had any other person or object (with the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln) for a hundred years. Holland and his boat were the epitome of the ridiculous. Reared in Ireland amid the stirring scenes of the 19th century, he received a good rudimentary education. He became a teacher in a Christian Brothers' school in Ire land. He heard of the attempts of David Bushnell and Robert Fulton to build a submersible craft, and he read of the declaration made to Fulton by Lord St. Vincent, when that inventor sought to interest him in the submarine. Such a craft, said the sea lord, was of no value to the nation that commanded the seas. Holland became obsessed by the idea, and worked continuously on submarine plans. Far from getting backers, he lacked even listeners. Then he went to America hoping to find financial help there. When he arrived in Boston he was ill, and was taken to a public hospital. During a long and tedious convalescence he worked over his plans, and he completed them. He found no backers in the New World, and was finally obliged to lay aside his plans and take up school teaching in Patterson, New Jersey. He saved his surplus, and built an experimental boat of wood, which he ever afterward insisted contained all the essential ideas of his perfected machine. Its launching, however, was a tragic failure from all Standpoints other than those of the comics, and Holland, in a, rage, towed his pathetic craft upstream one dark night and sank her in the mud, where she remains to this day. A little later he laid his ideas before an Irish patriots' society that was in control of a large 'skirmishing fund,' and the society decided to devote 80,000 dollars to the perfection of Holland's boat. The first one failed because of faulty construction, but demonstrated the correctness of his principles. Encouraged, he went ahead with a second one, which was a complete success. Holland gave up school teaching, and devoted his entire time to submarine navigation, and kept the people around the waters of New York highly entertained by his experiments. He cruised around, and bobbed up and down, causing stories of sea serpents, whales, and derelicts to riot on the eastern coast. The newspapers gave volumes to his activities and dubbed his craft the 'Fenian Ram.' His greatest improvement over other submarines was the rapidity with which he could submerse his vessel. Up to this time all submersibles had sunk on an even keel, consuming 10 to 15 minutes in the operation— plenty of time for an enemy to get home a fatal shot Holland (he said he took the porpoise for his model) was able to rise to the surface and disappear in five seconds. About this time the patriots (after the fashion of Irish patriots) fell out, and one faction 'kidnapped' the Ram, towed it to New Haven, Conn., hauled it on to dry land, and stored it in an outlying shed of a brass factory. It is still there. Inventors and mechanics in all countries, especially in America and France, continued to work on submarines, and in 1895 the United States Navy Department advertised for plans for a submarine, to be built at the Government's expense. Many plans were submitted, and when the best was selected, it was discovered that
the inventor was Holland. Then began a long struggle with officials and professionals, who insisted on 'improving' his specifications. Holland was not an engineer, but he was a trained draftsman, and he had no patience with the technicians, whom, he insisted, were revising his plans down ward. Many subsequent failures were credited by Holland to these modifications, and finally, in disgust, his company refunded to the Government 95,000 dollars, and Holland, in anger and despair, once more retired from the submersible stake. Then he came back, with a final request to build one boat exclusively on his own plans. The result was the 'Holland,' completed in 198, the first practicable submersible craft, and probably the most important war vessel that has been constructed since the beginning of time. The Holland was 50ft. long, and carried one torpedo tube. It could submerse in five seconds, and responded like a pure bred to its operator's touch. It was completed a few weeks before the blowing up of the Maine, and its wild inventor besought the Government for permission to take it into Santiago Harbor and blow up the Spanish fleet in retaliation. He caused the Government some real uneasiness. The Holland participated in the annual manoeuvres off New port in 1900, and every officer in the navy testified to its potentiality. Admiral Dewey, hero of Manila Bay, in an address before the Committee on Naval Affairs, said, among other things, that the moral effect, to my mind, is infinitely superior to mines or anything else of the kind. These things, moving under water, wear out the hardiest. With two of them in Galveston all the navies of the world could not blockade the place.' In 1904, England began, building submarines after plans purchased from Holland's company. In 1905 Japan followed suit, and endeavored, unsuccessfully, to induce Holland to go to Japan to supervise the construction of her submarines. In his Newark home, however, he drew the plans for the present Japanese submersible fleet. He always contended that Japan and Germany were the only two countries that had the true Holland submarine, and he died out of sorts with his own country because of the alterations that had been made in his specifications. However, all the submarines of all the navies are essentially of the Holland type.

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954) Sunday 6 May 1917 p 1 Article Illustrated
REV. FATHER CLUNE.
The Rev. Father Francis Clune (whose photo is printed herewith) who went away as chaplain, with a New South Wales battalion, and has performed deeds gallantry in France was vice-rector at the Passionist monastary at Glen Osmond for five or six years prior to leaving for Sydney about eight years ago (says "The Advertiser"). After seeing service on Gallipoli he went to France, and last Christmas he was wounded in the eyes by shrapnel. On his recovery, he returned to the front, and early this year was mentioned in one of Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig's despatches for gallantry.-. "It's a matter of living or dying with the boys now, and I am going right through with this war," he remarked, when he was leaving Australia for the front, and a recent cable message from London shows that these were no idle words. The message stated:-"Father Clune, a bearded padre in a New South Wales battalion, is famous for haunting the front trenches, despite contrary orders, on a pretence of carrying important letters, and other subterfuges. He took prisoner and brought in six Prussian Guardsmen, amidst the cheering of the Australians." Father Clune was born in County Clare about 45 years ago, and was 25 years of age when he arrived in Australia after a sojourn in America. He joined the Passionist Order in Australia, and having completed his novitiate, studied for the priesthood in the Goulburn monastery. He engaged in missionary work in practically every State for about 15 years after his ordination, and at the time of his enlistment was Superior of his Order and priest-in charge of St. Brigid's Church at Marrickville, near Sydney. His elder brother is Archbishop of Perth and Chaplain-General in the Australian (Imperial Forces.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 8 May 1917 p 4 Family Notices
McNAMARA -On the 7th May, at the Isolation Hospital, North terrace, Patrick McNamara, aged 79 years. R.I.P. A native of County Clare, Ireland.

The North Western Advocate and the Emu Bay Times (Tas. : 1899 - 1919) Friday 18 May 1917 p 3 Article
MERITORIOUS SERVICE
IMPERIAL MEDAL FOR MR. R. DRISCOLL.
HOBART, Thursday.— Imperial service medals have been presented to ex Supt. Richard Driscoll and Senior Constable Quinn, for long and meritorious service in the Police Department of Tasmania. Mr. Driscoll, now a resident of Devonport, hails from County Clare, Ireland, and was born in 1849, coming to the colonies when a young man. After spending a short time in Victoria he landed at Hobart, and two years afterwards he joined the police. In 1869-70 he had charge of part of the district of George Town, when gold was discovered at Waterhouse, and he remained there till August 1, .1874, when he was promoted to the charge of the district of Mersey, Latrobe, and West Devon, a position he retained for a quarter of a century, residing at Devonport. In 1899, when the centralisation of police was brought about, he was appointed Supt. of Police for the North, and lived at Launceston. When he left Devonport his high character and personal qualities were such that he was made the recipient of an address, couched in most flattering terms, and a silver tea and coffee service, valued at about £60. Upon the death of Supt. Scott eight or nine years ago, Mr. Driscoll was again transferred to Devonport, and three years ago last October, having reached the age limit, he retired from the force, and has since lived a life of retirement at East Devonport. He is a member of the Devonport Municipal Council.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 9 June 1917 p 9 Article Illustrated
Our Nhill correspondent writes:-"The death occurred at Lillimur recently of Mrs. Ann Jolly, at the age of 72 years. Mrs. Jolly was born in County Clare, Ireland, and before coming to Victoria resided at Moonta.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 9 June 1917 p 4 Family Notices
COOKE—KELLY. —On 28th April 1917, at St. Patrick's Church, Valley, by the Rev. Father O'Flynn, George Allan, second son of Mr. and Mrs. James Cooke, Rosalie, Brisbane, to Alice Marie, second daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kelly, Carmody-street, Ennis and Kilrush, County Clare, Ireland.

Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Hobart, Tas. : 1890 - 1922) Thursday 21 June 1917 p 1 Article
REDMOND'S MEMORY.
DEMONSTRATION AT ENNIS. London, Monday.
There was a demonstration at Ennis, County Clare, in memory of Major William Redmond, who was recently killed in action. Two thousand Nationalists marched in procession with draped flags, and a band playing funeral marches. The demonstration concluded with a funeral oration. The Nationalists selected Mr Patrick Lynch as a candidate for the late Major Redmond's seat.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 23 June 1917 p 6 Article
Mr. Michael Donohue, who died recently at his home at Fourth street, Bowden, at the age of 78 years, was an old and widely respected resident of the Hindmarsh district. Born in County Clare, Ireland, he came to South Australia 54 years, ago, since when he had resided almost continuously at Bowden. He had been in the service of the South Australian Gas Company for 45 years, and was esteemed by his employers. He was a member of the Hibernian Australasian Catholic Benefit Society for 53 years. His wife died in 1914. The surviving members of the family are three daughters and one son— Mrs. J. P. Cooney (Croydon), Mrs. G. Margitich (Adelaide). Miss M. Donohue (Bowden), and Mr. J. M. Donohue (Bowden). There are eight grandchildren.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 30 June 1917 p 11 Article Illustrated
Mr. F. O'Brien, who has reached the age limit and retires from the service to-day, is one of the oldest and best known district foremen in the South Australian railway service. He was born in Smithtown, County Clare, and with his parents came to Australia when two and a half years old, arriving in Sydney on New Year's Day, 1850. Two years later the family came to Adelaide. They settled at Kapunda, at the time the copper mine was in full swing. Mr. O'Brien was employed in the blacksmith work at the mine. In 1869 he obtained employment on the railway line then under construction to Burra. In December, 1875, he was appointed ganger at Farrell's Flat, and whilst there he did yeoman service in connection with the great breakdown near Burra, when Foreman Holmes and other officials lost their lives through a wheat special plunging into a bridge that had been washed away during the night. His ability was appreciated by his superiors, and in 1881 he was appointed construction foreman on the great northern lines, where he did excellent work. In 1889 he was transferred to the western system at Port Wakefield, where as in his previous districts he had to deal with a series of washaways. His previous experience enabled him to cope with the matter promptly and the delay to traffic was of short duration. Mr. O'Brien and his wife and daughters intend to reside at Torrensville. There are three sons, who are in the railway service-Messrs. Daniel and Austin O'Brien, of the loco. department. Petersburg; and Mr. John Joseph O'Brien, head clerk to the traffic superintendent, Wallaroo.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Wednesday 11 July 1917 p 2 Article
OBITUARY.
MR. DARBY CONOLE.
Our Dartmoor correspondent writes: -"I regret to record the death of one of our old and respected residents. I refer to Mr. Darby Conole, storekeeper, Dartmoor, who passed away at his residence on June 21. The deceased gentleman was born in County Clare, Ire- land, in 1839, and was thus 78 years of age. Mr. Conole started, storekeeping in Dartmoor 44 years ago, and previous to that was hawking among the stations in the Western District. Mrs. Conole died about 15 months ago. There was a family of nine--five sons and four daughters. The sons are Messrs. James, Luke (constable, W.A.), Richard, Lieutenants V. J., and Matthew, and the daughters are Mrs. M. Spinser, and the Misses Sarah, Dolly, and, Winnie Conole. The funeral took place on Friday, June 22, and was largely attended. The officiating minister was the Rev. Father? Cain, of Portland."

West Gippsland Gazette (Warragul, Vic. : 1898 - 1930) Tuesday 17 July 1917 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Family Notices
In fond and loving memory of my dear mother, who died on the 16th July, 1905, at Ennis, County Clare, reland. My mother's a sleeping by the murmuring stream; Flow gently, sweet Shannon, disturb not her dream. Over the ocean I still think of thee. - Inserted by her loving daughter, Mrs Walter Kelly, Warragul. R.I.P.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Saturday 21 July 1917 p 5 Article
MRS. ANNIE LEMKE. Our Narracoortc correspondent writes --"Mrs. Annie Lemke, an old resident of the district, died on Wednesday, at the age of 77 years. She was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia in the year 1863, landing at Port Adelaide. She had resided in the Narracoorte district since 1877, and was twice married. She leaves a husband, Mr. F. W. Lemke and two sons and two daughters.

Warwick Examiner and Times (St. Lucia, Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Monday 23 July 1917 p 5 Article
There are few of the old settlers of the Darling Downs who did not know the late Mr. Patrick Keating and the knowledge of his death, which took place at his late residence, the Rail way Hotel, Cambooya, on Saturday morning last, will cause a wave of sympathy to be extended to the bereaved family. Many an act of kind ness, many a deed of charity, and many a weary wanderer made cheerful at his hands will ever be remembered of the deceased. Although the most skillful medical attention, the best of nursing, and the solicitude of an affectionate family did much to assuage his sufferings he had reached the limit of his life's race at 53 years and passed away surrounded by all the sweet solace that his holy religion could give him. The deceased gentleman was the youngest son of the late Michael Keating, of Cabarlah, being himself a native of County Clare, Ireland. He was but an infant when he arrived with his parents on the Darling Downs. Mr. Keating leaves, to mourn their irreparable loss, a widow and ten children—seven daughters and three sons. Two daughters are married—Mrs. Denis Egan, of Coogar, and Mrs. Jack Murdoch, of Warwick. The remainder of the family are at home, with the exception of the eldest son, Michael, who is fighting "somewhere in France." Also surviving him are three sisters— Mrs. Higgins (Locke-street), Mrs. Stanfleld (Beaudesert), and Mrs. Hayes (Charlton), as well as one brother, Mr. Tom Keating, of Cabarlah. The funeral took place yesterday (Sunday) to the Toowoomba Cemetery and was largely attended. The Rev. Father Murphy read the last requiem offices at the graveside. The expressions of condolence are far reaching, as the late Mr. Keating was very well known, and his passing to eternity will cause many a moist eye.

The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918) Monday 3 September 1917 p 2 Article
The death occurred in Camperdown on Friday of an old and highly esteemed resident of the district in the person of Mr Patrick Darcy, of South Purrumbete. The deceased gentleman, who had reached the advanced age of 78 years, was a native of County Clare, Ireland. He landed in Victoria about 53 years ago, first taking up his residence at Beeac, where he remained a few years. From that place he moved to South Purrumbee, where he had lived for a period extending over 47 years. The late Mr Darcy followed farming putsuits. He lived a useful life and his demise will be regretted by a large circle of admirers. He leaves a widow and family of four daughters and one son to mourn their irreparable loss, for whom the deepest sympathy is felt. The daughter are:-Mrs R. Dawson (Geelong), Mrs A. Darcy (Cloven Hils), Mrs John Darcy (South Purrumbete), Mrs G. Nicholls (South Purrumbete), and Mr Michael Thomas Darcy, of South Purrumbete, is son. Mrs Dempsey, of Pirron Yalloak, is a sister, and Mr John Darcy, of Terang, is a brother of deceased.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Tuesday 4 September 1917 p 6 Family Notices
O'GRADY.- In loving memory of our dear son Private W. J. O'Grady, killed in action at Pozieres, August 5th 1916, and grandson of the late Right Honourable Sir Waller O’Grady, Queen's Counsellor, also grandson of James Ready, Cooraclare, County Clare, Ireland. American and home papers please copy. Inserted by his loving father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. W. O'Grady, McKay.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 6 September 1917 p 4 Article Illustrated
Mr. Peter Kerin, of Forde, near Kapunda, died a few days ago. He had been a resident of that district since 1862, and was highly esteemed. He was born near Ballyvaughan, County Clare, Ireland, 77 years ago, and us a youth helped his father on the farm in Ireland. He came to South Australia in the ship Lady Ann, in 1858, when 19 years of age, and on his arrival worked for the late Mr. David Shannon and the late Mr. James White. He took up land at Forde in 1862, in con junction with his brother Patrick, but dis solved partnership after a few years, and continued farming on his own account. He maintained a keen interest in improving the standard of draught stock. In 1864 he married Miss Mary Hill, who survives. Of 10 children born, seven are living.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 20 September 1917 p 6 Article
The Rev. J. J. Cusack died at his New- port Catholic Presbytery late on Tuesday evening. Latterly he had not enjoyed good health. Deceased, who was born at O'Brien's Bridge, County Clare, Ireland, in 1856, was educated at All Hallows' College, Dublin, and was ordained to the priesthood in 1886. In September of that year he arrived in Melbourne, and had been stationed in the archdiocese ever since. For the first four years he was a curate at St. Patrick's Cathedral, St. Francis's Church, and West Melbourne, and was the first parish priest at Drysdale, where he remained nine years.
He had charge of the Gordon parish 17 years. When Newport was separated from Williamstown, about a year ago, and created a new parish, the late Father Cusack was placed in charge there. Father Cusack, of Iona, is a cousin of the deceased. At St. Patrick's Cathedral this morning a Requiem Mass is to be celebrated.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Thursday 20 September 1917 p 5 Family Notices
OBITUARY. THE LATE MR. COLEMAN HYNES. The death occurred in the early hours of Sunday morning of Mr. Coleman Hynes, storekeeper, of 391 Fitzgerald-street, North. Perth. The deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, but had resided in New Zealand for 30 years, Victoria five years, New South Wales five years, and in this State for the past 22 years. He was well known and highly, respected in the goldfields as a mining man and contractor. Mr. Hynes leaves a widow and a grown-up family of five sons and four daughters to mourn their loss. The funeral cortege moved from his late residence on Tuesday afternoon and proceeded to the Church of the Sacred Heart, Highgate Hill, where the first portion of the burial service was performed by the Rev. Father T. Crowley, thence to the Roman Catholic portion of the Karrakatta Cemetery, where the remains were laid, to rest. The Rev. Father P. Masterson conducted the last rites. The chief mourners were Mrs. M. Hynes (widow), Mrs. W. Price, Mrs. J. F. Lewis, Mrs. A. Solomons, and .Mrs. R. C. Cohen (daughters); Messrs. Patrick and Frank Hynes (sons), Mrs. J. Hynes (daughter-in-law), Mr. W. Price, Mr.J. F. Lewis, and Mr. A. Solomons (sons-in-law), and Master W. Price (grandson). The pallbearers were Mr. J. F. Lydon, Mr. A. Falconer, Mr. J. Falconer, Mr. T. W. Scott, Mr. A. Heinrichs, Private H. Scanlan, Mr. W. Gilligan, and Mr. T. W. M'Crath. Among those present were Messrs. R. A. Gamble, D. Tulloch, T. Nagle, W. Kinnimonc, J. Mitchell, J.- Hudson, J. Curtin, G. Wilson, C. Williams, and Private A. West. Amongst numerous floral tokens received were wreaths from the sons and daughters, Mr. J. W. Hiscock. Mr. and Mrs. Beary, Mr. and Mrs. A. Falconer and family, Mr. and Mrs. Davidson, Mrs. Needle and son, Mr. and Mrs. Battams, Mr. and Mrs. MGrath, Bennie and Russell, Mr. T. W. Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Heinrichs, Mr. O'Donnell and sons, Mrs. Purcell, and Mrs. Kelly. A large number of letters, telegrams, and messages of sympathy and condolence were received by the bereaved family. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea.

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 26 September 1917 p 3 Article
The late Mr Michael Kelly, of Booborowie, who died on September 16th, was a native of Ireland, being born in County Clare in 1836. He arrived in July, 1857, therefore was a colonist for 60 years. After arriving here, he was employed in the Kapunda Copper Mine, and from there removed to Manoora to take up farming. He was a councillor in the Saddleworth District Council for several years and was a Forester for up- wards of 50 years. In 1864 he married Elizabeth, youngest daughter of the late Timothy Murphy, of St. Johns, Kapunda, who pre-deceased him by six years. In 1895 he removed to Booborowie where he was engaged in dairying to the time of his death. He was a life long adherent of the Roman Catholic Church, and took a prominent part in connection with the building of churches at Kapunda, Manoora and Booborowie. He had a family of 11 sons and 1 daughter, viz., Messrs T. and W. Kelly, Booborowie; Michael, Black Springs; J., A., and S. Kelly, Broken Hill; Cpl. D. I. Kelly, and Ptes. E. and J. Kelly, France; and Tpr. T. Kelly, 3rd Light Horse, Egypt; and Mrs J. F. Hogan, Booborowie. One son is dead and there are 12 grand-children.

The Ararat advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Saturday 20 October 1917 Edition: tri-weekly p 2 Article
MRS ELLEN ROBERTSON. An old resident of St. Arnaud died on Tuesday, in the person of Mrs Ellen Robertson, aged 82 years. She was born at County Clare, Ireland, and came to Victoria 63 years ago. She was married in Ararat and her husband died some years ago. Mrs Cadzow, of Streatham, is a daughter of the deceased.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 25 October 1917 p 6 Family Notices
QUINLAN. -October 22 at the residence of her niece, Lindisfarne, Powell-street, Killara, Mary Thomasina, relict of the late Thomas Quinlan, of Mungret House, County Limerick, Ireland, daughter of the late John O'Halloran of Derrymore, County Clare, and grand daughter of the late Thomas Carmody, of Cullane Castle, County Clare, aged 86.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 14 November 1917 p 6 Article Illustrated
Mr. Michael Manning, an old resident of Eurelia, died last Friday, at the age of 99 years. He was born in County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in South Australia in 1853 in the ship Adebon, which sailed from America, where he had spent five years prior to coming to Australia. After farming in the Saddleworth district for 24 years, Mr. Manning took up land in Eurelia, where he had resided ever since. He has left a widow, five sons, two daughters, 11 grandchildren, and five great- grandchildren.

Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Thursday 29 November 1917 p 2 Article
DEATH OF MR. P. ROWEN.
A very old and much respected resident of Singleton, in the person of Mr Patrick Rowen, passed away at his residence, Queen-street, Redbournberry, at 4 a.m. yesterday. The deceased, who had reached the ripe old age of 87 years, was born in county Clare. Ireland, and came to Australia some 60 years ago, first settling in Queensland, where he engaged in mining and station work for a few years. He then shifted to New South Wales, settling first at Wollombi and later at Cessnock as a farmer. Some 50 years ago he came to the Singleton district and settled at Boggy Flat, and then at Vere, purchasing the property known as "Glen Patrick" at the latter place. He followed up farming with much success, until his retirement from work 17 years ago. He then erected the house in Queen-street where he spent the evening of his life. The late Mr Rowen was of a genial and, happy personality, and a fine type of Irishman. He was well-known right throughout, the district, and had friends in all parts. Up till 10 weeks ago, when he took to his bed, he had enjoyed remarkably good health, and had never needed a doctor till then. He leaves a widow, three sons, and six daughters to mourn their loss. The sons are—Martin (Scott's Flat), Patrick (Clarence Town), and John (Blackall, Q.). The daughters are—Mrs J. Brady (Maitland), Mrs E. Burns (Maitland), Mrs. L. Breen (Minmi), Mrs W. Monaghan (Sydney), Miss Ellen Rowen (Singleton; and Miss Johanna (Sister Ignatius, New Zealand).[Johanna Rohan, born 22 July 1875 Singleton, NSW, to parents Patrick Rohan and Johanna O’Brien, entered convent 8 December 1906, died 6 May 1946, Wagga Wagga, NSW. – moh] The funeral takes place at 3 p.m. to-day (Thursday).

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Thursday 29 November 1917 p 3 Article
Melbourne 'Punch' says that the marriage of Sir Michael O'Loghlen,, Bart, H.M.L., of Drumconora, County Clare, to Beatrice, daughter of Sir Michael Murphy, Bart., of Wyckham, Dundrum, Dublin, which has just taken place in Ireland, should excite quite an extensive interest in Melbourne, where, a few short years ago, Sir Michael O'Loghlen, Bart, H.M.L, was just Mickie O'Loghlen, son of Bryan O'Loghlen, once prominent in Victorian politics; but when Mickie was a law student at Melbourne University, a plain Irish 'gintleman' with a hard battle to make ends meet Mickie O'Loghlen had many sweethearts in St. Kilda, and now those that had the chance (and several claim they had) are biting their fingers. Mickie is Sir Michael O'Loghlen, Bart, H.M.L., with an Irish lieutenancy worth 2,000 a year, Drumconora Castle, and a big fortune left him by a maternal uncle.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 22 December 1917 p 1 Family Notices
BOLAND.-On the 18th December, at Mt. St. Evins private hospital. Edmond Boland, fourth son of the late Edmond and Mary Boland, Shannonnuck, County Clare, Ireland. (Interred privately, 19th December, Melbourne General Cemetery.)

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Wednesday 26 December 1917 Edition: THIRD EDITION p 3 Article
The engagement is announced of Miss Eileen O'Grady (of the Education Department), third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. O'Grady, County Clare, Ireland, to Lieut. J. J. Connor (on active service and formerly of National Bank) eldest son of the late Inspector and Mrs. J. Connor, Spencer-street, Albany.

Warwick Examiner and Times (St. Lucia, Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Saturday 29 December 1917 p 5 Article
We regret to chronicle the death of Mr. Michael Devitt, which took place in the Brisbane General Hospital on Tuesday last, after a brief ill ness of three days. The late Mr. Devitt was very well-known and popular in Warwick and throughout the district, his ever ready wit and name for straight dealing gaining him many friends who will sincerely regret his demise. He was born in County Clare, Ireland, and was 60 years of age. He arrived in Queensland about 36 years ago, and after working at his trade of a tailor in Brisbane for a time he came on to Warwick, where he commenced business on his own account, relinquishing same about 12 months ago, when, he left for Brisbane. Deceased was one of the foundation members of the Warwick branch of the H.A.C.B. Society. He leaves a widow, who resides in Fitzroy-street, and a son, Joseph, who lives in Brisbane. Another son, Francis, joined the A.I.F. and, after fighting in France, has been missing for some time.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 3 January 1918 p 4 Family Notices
LISTON. —On the 31st December, 1917, at Port Augusta Hospital, Kate, beloved daughter of the late John Liston, County Clare, Ireland.

Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 - 1954) Thursday 10 January 1918 Edition: DAILY p 6 Article
The death occurred at Montagu on Sunday of Mrs. Mary Saward sen., aged 74 years, and a resident of Circular Head for 60 years. The deceased lady, who was married twice, was the first white woman to reside in Montagu. She leaves a very numerous family of descendants. She was born in County Clare, Ireland.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 10 January 1918 p 9 Article
LATE MR. JOHN WARREN WHITE.
Mr. John Warren White, sen., a grand old citizen of Brisbane, died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. K. Hutchinson, Vulture-street, South Brisbane, last night, at the age of 91 years. The late Mr. John Warren White was born in Caherblonnich (County Clare, Ireland), and was a citizen of Queensland for over 6O years. For over 35 years he had been a resident of Brisbane, and was both widely known and widely respected. He leaves a widow, three daughters, and three sons. The daughters are Mrs. Hutchinson, Mrs. R. B. Echlin, and Miss White, and the sons are Mr. J. Warren White, Colonel D. P. White, and Major General C. B. White, C.B., D.S O., C.M.G. The two latter are at the Front, and his only three grandsons are also at the Front.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 16 January 1918 p 1 Family Notices
MACDONALD.-In loving memory of Margaret Mary MacDonald, who died at "Duart," No. 121 Beaconsfield parade, Albert Park, on the 16th January, 1916, the beloved wife of William MacDonald, mother of "Lottie," and eldest daughter of the late Thomas O'Brien, Esq., of Elizabeth street, Melbourne, and Killaloe, County Clare, Ireland, solicitor. R.I.P.
May God In His infinite mercy grant her eternal happiness.
"To live in the hearts of those we love is not to die.
(Inserted by her sorrowing husband and daughter, "Lottie")

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 22 January 1918 p 4 Article
Mr. T. Quinn, who died at Ovingham on January 8, was born at Ennisdiamond, County Clare, Ireland, 85 years ago. In the early seventies he took up land at Gumcracha and removed to the hundred of Cavenagh in 1880, where he farmed successfully until about seven years ago, when he retired. Two sons-Messrs. P. F. and P. A. Quinn-and a daughter-Mrs. C.H. Burden-of Dawson, survive him.

The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918) Wednesday 30 January 1918 p 2 Article
Mrs Honorah Sexton, relict of the late Michael Sexton, died early on Monday morning. She had been in failing health during the past twelve months. Deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and a colonist of 53 years, and a resident of Swan Marsh for over 40 years. She was of a very charitable disposition, and highly esteemed by all who knew her. She leaves a grown-up family of five sons and three daughters, and sincere sympathy is extended to them in their bereavement. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon and was the largest seen in Colac for some time. Her body, encased in a solid oak casket, silver mounts, was conveyed to St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, where Mass was celebrated by the Very Rev. Father Kennelly, and then the cortege proceeded to the Colac Cemetery, where the body was laid to rest in the family allotment in the Roman Catholic portion. The casket bearers were Messrs Peter, Thomas, James, Jeremiah and Patrick Sexton, sons of deceased, and Mr H. Devine. The pall was supported by Messrs Thos. Minto, J. Consedine, M. Tonkinson, Tim. Hassett, A.G. Spark, M. M'Grath, P. M'Grath, J. Foster, M. Darcy and J. Ryan. The service at the grave was conducted by the Rev Father Kennelly, and the funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr G. James.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 4 February 1918 p 4 Article
Mr. Patrick Henery, who died at Alpana, Blinman, recently, at the age of 84, was a colonist of 71 years. Born in 1834 in County Clare, Ireland, he arrived at Sydney when 12 years of age. He shortly afterwards left for South Australia, and entered the employment of the late Sir Walter Hughes, at Watervale. He was subsequently engaged for years with the late Hon. G. C. Hawker, of Bungaree Station, as (among other positions) manager of Anama and the Carriewerloo Stations west of Port Augusta. He afterwards managed the late Mr. Henry Scott's Oraparinna Station, which he left to establish his Alpana homestead near Blinman. Deceased was highly respected, and was the acknowledged local authority on sheep. For many years his clip held front rank among local growths. In 1854 he married Miss Downer, who predeceased him by about 13 years. Deceased has left one son and five daughters, 30 grandchildren, and 31 great-grandchildren.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 14 February 1918 p 1 Family Notices
O'MEARA. -On the 12th February, 1918, at his residence, Little River, Francis, the dearly beloved husband of Ellen O'Meara, also beloved father of Maggie, Richard, Frank, Mary, Annie, and Pat, aged 77 years. A native of County Clare, Ireland, and a colonist of 55 years. R.I.P.

Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 - 1954) Sunday 17 February 1918 Section: Second Section p 5 Article
There died recently in Wandering, at the residence of her son, an old W.A. pioneer in the person of Mrs. Eliza Dowsett. Ninety-one years old at the time of her death, the deceased lady was a native of County Clare, Cork, Ireland, and came to Australia with her husband long since deceased in the early fifties. She had resided in Wandering for 55 years. The late Mrs. Dowsett leaves three sons, two daughters, 40 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Saturday 16 February 1918 p 4 Article
THE LATE MRS M'CORMACK.
Another of Singleton's old and highly respected residents passed away to her long rest this week, in the person of Mrs. Mary Manning M'Cormack, who died at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr R. Edwards, Castlereagh-street. The deceased, who was 88 years of age, had fairly good health up to about a fort night ago, and she succumbed to senility and exhaustion on Monday last. The late Mrs M'Cormack had many interesting reminiscences of the old days in New South Wales, having arrived here as far back as 66 years ago. She was a native of county Clare, Ireland, and had been a widow for many years. She leaves a family of three sons and two daughters, the age of the eldest being 64 years and of the youngest 50 years. The old lady had made many friends during her long residence in this district, and she enjoyed the highest esteem and respect of all who knew her. The funeral took place at the Catholic cemetery on Tuesday.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 5 March 1918 p 6 Article Illustrated
Mrs. H. Bawden died at her residence. Maitland, early on Thursday morning at the age of 76 (says the ''Maitland Watch"). She has been an invalid for 15 years. She was a colonist of 68 years, having come to South Australia with her widowed mother (Mrs. Coffey) and brothers from county Clare, in 1850. The family took up land on the Light at Hamley Bridge. In 1861 Miss Coffey married Mr. Hugh Bawden, and they went farming at Ross' Creek, three miles west of Kapunda. They lived there for some years and then went to Brinkworth, and afterwards, in the early eighties, to Sandilands. A little more than ten years ago they sold out and settled in Maitland. There was a family of ten, of whom two daughters and six sons are living - Mesdames F. Edson, Murat Bay, and Duff, Murrayvale. Victoria, and Messrs. George, Western Australia, Hugh, Charles, and James, Sandilands, John, Murat Bay, and Thomas Bawden, Hammond.

The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918) Monday 4 March 1918 p 2 Article
Mrs Hannah O'Brien, relic of the late M.r John O'Brien, of Beech Forest, and Colac, died on Friday night at Colac West at the age of 72 years. Deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and a colonist for up wards of 60 years, and was well known and very highly respected. Her husband died about six years ago. She leaves a family of six to mourn their loss, and sincere sympathy is extended to them in their sad bereavement. Her body was entrained at Colac for Spencer street on Saturday evening, and the funeral moved front Mr J. Ousley's residence, Peer street, Richmond for the Bulla cemetery yesterday (Sunday) after noon, where the body was laid to rest in the family allotment in the Roman Catholic portion. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Mr George James.

The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918) Monday 25 March 1918 p 2 Article
An old colonist in the person of Mrs Harlock, sister of the late Mr Mark Daffy, died at Ballarat on Saturday, and was buried in the Beeac cemetery yesterday. The deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Victoria 70 years ago. She arrived in the Cundare district about 1860 and left there about 40 years ago. She came of a long-lived family. Her grandmother died at the age of 103 years, her mother at 100 years, whilst deceased was 96 years of age. The pall bearers were Messrs M. Hartney, J. Moloney, M. Jacob, M. Daffy, P. Darcy, R. Daffy, C. Bouchier and J. Darcy. The service was conducted by the Rev. Father Kennelly, and the funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr T. W. Sharrow.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Friday 5 April 1918 p 3 Article
Mrs. Bridget Monaghan, an old resident of the Penola district, died at the residence of her niece (Mrs. P. Fogarty last week. She was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia with relatives about sixty years ago, landing at Port Adelaide. After residing in Adelaide for a few years she came to Penola, and was married in 1869 to the late Mr. Thos. Monaghan. She was 80 years of age. During the past 12 months the deceased had resided with her niece at Narracoorte.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 6 April 1918 p 9 Article Illustrated
The death is announced of Mrs. Monaghan, an old and respected resident of the Penola district. She was born in County Clare and came to Australia with her relatives about 60 years ago, landing at Port Adelaide. After residing in Adelaide for a few years she went to Penola and was married there in 1869 to the late Mr. Thomas Monaghan. She was 80 years of age, and her maiden name was Kelly. During the past twelve months she had resided with her niece, Mrs. P. Fogarty, at Narracoorte.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Tuesday 9 April 1918 p 3 Article
MR. PATRICK McMAHON.
Another of our old residents has passed away, in the person of Mr. Patrick, McMahon, Worrolong, who died very suddenly this morning. Mr. McMahon was in town a few days ago, and apparently was in his usual health, but on Sunday he complained that he did not feel very well. On Monday he was in his accustomed place at the school- house, Worrolong. This morning, however, when about to start for the school, he collapsed and died. The late Mr. McMahon was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1847, and was thus in his 71st year. He decided, when quite a young man, to try his fortune in Australia. After he arrived in Adelaide he went to Kapunda, where he stayed for a time, and then came to the South-East. Over forty years ago he settled in the Worrolong district, and soon after opened the school, of which he was in charge up to the day of his death. Mr. McMahon never took any active part in public affairs, but he was a loyal supporter of St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church, and he was also a very old member of St. Lawrence O'Tool's branch of the H.A.C.B. Society. He was of a quiet, retiring disposition, but was much liked by all who came in contact with him. Mrs. McMahon died several years ago. The following members of his family survive:-Misses Mary and Deborah McMahon (of Worrolong), and Sister Mary Dympna (of the Good Samaritan Order, Sydney) [Ellen Margaret, born 29 December 1886, Mount Gambier South Australia, to parents Patrick McMahon and Mary or Deborah McSheehy or Sheehy, entered Convent 29 September 1913, died 6 September 1963 in Victoria, buried Fawkner Cemetery, Victoria. – moh]; and Messrs, Jas. T. and P. J. McMahon (of Mount Gambier), and Brother John (of Rev. Father Healy's Home, Thebarton). [St. John the Baptist Brothers, died 31 December 1955, Melbourne, Victoria. – moh].

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) Saturday 27 April 1918 p 6 Article
A staunch old identity of Parramatta, Mr. Michael Guerin, celebrated his 80th birthday this week. He landed in N.S.W. on Nov. 5, 1862, and has been a resident of Parramatta for 57 years. He's a County Clare man, where so many good men come from. The old gentleman, since the death of Mrs. Guerin, has resided with his son Fred— 'our' Fred, who has been keeping “The Argus'' machinery in fine order well nigh thirty years, and has been in the office only a few week's less than the 'bosses' themselves. Congratulations to a good man, and many happy returns.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 11 May 1918 p 15 Article
One of the oldest residents of the Nanango district, Mr Thomas McNamara, aged 76, a native of County Clare, Ireland, was buried in the Nanango Cemetery on Thursday. He came to Australia in the Earl Russell in 1864, coming on to Nanango the following year. He took up land on the Taalbinga road, where he followed the occupation of a farmer and grazier until his death on Tuesday night. He is survived by a wife and two sons-Councillor T G McNamara and Mr Alex M'Namara, both of Nanango. The funeral was very largely attended.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) Saturday 18 May 1918 p 6 Article
Mr. John Cusack (78), a native of County Clare, Ireland, and husband of Mrs. Jane Cusack, of Wentworth-street, Parramatta, passed away on Sunday. Mr. Cusack was twice married, his first wife being Miss Catherine Glynn, of Bega. He left four children, one son and three daughters (two of whom are married). His funeral took place on Monday. The arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. V. Morris and Co.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 21 May 1918 p 4 Family Notices
KELLY.— On the 17th May, at his residence, Rathgar, Pinnaroo, William Henry Kelly, aged 78 years, beloved husband of Emily Anne Kelly, brother of Edward Kelly (of Brucefield), Henry Kelly (of Kilkerran), John Kelly (of Point Macleay), and Mrs. J. Ward (of Brucefield), and eldest son of the late Henry George Kelly, of Kilkerran (late Sub-inspector of Royal Irish Constabulary, County Clare, Ireland).

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Thursday 23 May 1918 p 3 Article
WELL-KNOWN DISTRICT RESIDENT KILLED.
A sad fatality occurred between Camperdown and Kariah yesterday. At about 1.30 p.m. Mr. James M'Mahon, farmer, of Kariah, was driving to his home from Camperdown pig sale, and when crossing the old Tunboon-road the vehicle struck the culvert post, Mr. M'Mahon, who was alone, being thrown out on his head. Death, apparently, was instantaneous. Word was sent to the Camperdown police and Constable A. W. Dainty proceeded to the scene of the accident. The body was lying on the roadside. Mounted-constable T. M'Namara then arrived and the body was placed in the waggon and brought to the Camperdown police station, where Dr. Desailly made an examination and pronounced life extinct. Mr. M. Quinn, J.P., the Deputy-Coroner, attended and gave an order for burial. An inquest will be held at a date to be fixed. Constable M'Namara, in his report, states that it was evident from the position in which the deceased was found that the accident was due to misjudgment of deceased when reaching the culvert. The late Mr. M'Mahon was an old and very highly-respected resident of district and his untimely end will come as a shock to a large circle of friends. He was 68 years of age and was born in County Clare, Ireland. He arrived in Victoria in the year 1852, first residing at Birregurra, but many years since he removed to Kariah, where he successfully followed farming pursuits up to the time of his death. His end removes one who was for long creditably associated with the history of this district, and sincere and wide spread sympathy will be felt for the bereaved widow and family, including four sons and four daughters. The sons are Messrs. Joseph (Kariah), James and John (Bookar) and Patrick (Skibo) and the daughters Mrs. Greaves, of Mount Myrtoon and Misses Elizabeth, Catherine and Sarah, of Kariah. The funeral will leave deceased's late residence at Kariah to-morrow (Friday) at 1 p.m. for the Camperdown Cemetery. Messrs Collie and Brennan have charge of the funeral arrangements.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Saturday 25 May 1918 p 5 Family Notices
THE LATE MR. T. CROWLEY. The funeral of the late Mr. Thomas Crowley, of Donnybrook, took place on Friday morning in the Roman Catholic portion of the Karrakatta Cemetery. The Rev. Father P. Mastersen conducted the last rites. The chief mourners were Mrs. Mary Crowley (widow), Messrs. James and Matthew (on active service), Thomas, John, Francis, and Patrick Crowley (sons), Misses May and Kathleen Crowley (daughters), Miss J. King, Miss Carroll, and Mr. Chas. Haynes (representing the Amalgamated Society of Railway Employes). The deceased, who was 59 years of age, was a native of County Clare, Ireland. He came to this State in 1887, and 27 years ago he entered the railway service, where he continued to work until twelve months ago, when failing health compelled him to retire. Mr. Crowley was well known and highly respected at Donnybrook, where he worked on the railway for 23 years. A large number of letters, telegrams, and messages of sympathy and condolence were received by the bereaved family. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea.

The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate (NSW : 1892 - 1927) Tuesday 4 June 1918 p 2 Article
ELIZABETH LAW.
Another old and respected resident of the Dubbo district passed over the Great Divide last evening, in the person of Mrs. Elizabeth Law. Deceased, who was 87 years of age, and who had been a resident of the district for about 45 years, was one of the best known and most respected pioneers of this great district. The death occurred at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. S. McFetridge, "Harefield," Coborah road, where she had been residing for some years. The late Mrs. Law was married twice, her first husband being the late John Deeves and her second husband, the late David Law. For years deceased resided at Brocklehurst, and was noted for her hospitality and warm-heartedness in the cause of charity or affliction. She was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia when only a girl. Only one daughter survives to mourn her loss, Mrs. S. McFetridge, but her grandchildren number 13 and her great grand-children number 4. The funeral takes place tomorrow morning at 11 o'clock. Mr. McCallum (Presbyterian) will conduct a short service at "Hareifield," after which the remains will be conveyed to the local cemetery and laid to rest in the Presbyterian portion. Mr. McCallum will read the burial service and Mr. J. R. Tighe has charge of the funeral arrangements.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 3 June 1918 p 4 Family Notices
O'CONNOR.-June a, 1918, Martin O'Connor, native of County Clare, Ireland, late of Permanent Way Dept.; also Windsor and Richmond, aged 79 years, R.I.P.

The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918) Friday 7 June 1918 p 2 Article
The funeral of the late Mr Martin McMahon, whose death was reported in our last issue, took place yesterday afternoon. Deceased, who was born at County Clare, Ireland, came to Victoria about sixty years ago and had resided in the Pirron Yalloak district for the last fifty years, where he was held in very high esteem. The late Mr McMahon, who had reached the age of 86 years, leaves a widow and six children. The pall bearers were Messrs M. Hickey, T. McGrath, D. Maloney, A. C. Cooke, M. McMahon, and A. Mathieson, and the coffin was carried by Messrs M. McMahon, W. Wicking, L. Henry and J. Hallanan. The Rev. P. Kennelly officiated at the grave, and the funeral arrangements were in the hands of Mr T. W. Sharrow.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Monday 10 June 1918 p 6 Article
Mr. Michael McMahon, of Mologa, near Pyramid Hill, who died on Friday at the age of 91 years, came to Victoria from county Clare, Ireland, in 1857. He worked on the goldfields, and selected land at Mologa in 1876.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 12 June 1918 p 11 Article
An old resident, Mrs. Martin Hayes, of Charlton, aged 74 years, died on Saturday at a private hospital in Toowoomba. The deceased was born at Kilbaha, County Clare, Ireland, and had been in Queensland 50 years. She married 53 years ago, Mr. Martin Hayes, who has carried on farming since his arrival in Queensland. There are three sons and four daughters living, including Messrs. Michael Hayes (Kingsthorpe), Denis and Edmund (Charlton), Mother Raphael (Gladstone convent), Sisters Bertrum and Gertrude (Rockhampton), and Mrs. Bolton (Sydney). [Sister Raphael, born Catherine Hayes 16 July 1869 at Dalby, Qld., to parents Martin and Bridget Keatine, died 5 June 1947 Rockhampton, Qld. Sister Bertrand, born Mary Hayes 27 April 1873 at Toowoomba, Qld., to parents, Martin Hayes and Bridget Keating, entered Mercy Order 11 February 1897, died 26 September 1935 Rockhampton, Qld. Sister Gertrude, born Ellen Hayes 16 April 1874 at Toowoomba, Qld., to parents, Martin Hayes and Bridget Keating, entered Mercy Order 29 September 1896, died 1 February 1951 Rockhampton, Qld. – moh]

Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Hobart, Tas. : 1890 - 1922) Thursday 13 June 1918 p 2 Article
A Pioneer: Mr. Michael McMahon, of Mologa, near Pyramid Hill (Vic.), who died on Friday at the age of 91 years came to Victoria from county Clare, Ireland, in 1857. He worked on the goldfields, and selected land at Mologa in 1876. He remained on the land until he went West.

Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 27 June 1918 Edition: EVENING p 2 Article
Mr JAMES LANDERS. - We regret to record the death of Mr James Landers, which took place at his late residence, 33 Michael street, Bendigo, on Monday morning. The deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in Adelaide 52 years ago. Coming to Victoria a few years later.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 4 July 1918 p 7 Article
…The route of the new railway is one of the prettiest in the State, and includes historic ground. Clare was founded in the early days by Edward Burton Gleeson, 'Paddy Gleeson, King of Clare' as he was nicknamed. He called his homestead Inchiquin, after his old home in County Clare. He also, named Armagh and Donnybrook. In 1838 he divided his land into blocks, which gradually became settled; but the corporation of the town was not proclaimed until 1868. Mr. Gleeson be came first Mayor, and was re-elected the following year….

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 16 July 1918 p 4 Article
The late Mr. Philip Brady was 77 years, and was born at Cross Keys, County Cavan, Ireland, where he followed farming pursuits on his father's property, until he was 25 years of age, when he emigrated to South Australia. Deceased arrived in the ship Northumberland in 1867, after a voyage of three months. Shortly afterwards he associated himself with the farming industry at Dry Creek, and later on purchased a section of land in what was then known as Barabba Scrub. Mr. Brady became one of the earliest pioneers, and eventually the largest land owner in the district, where he resided until his death. He married Honora M. fifth daughter of the late Mr. John Behan, of County Clare, Ireland, and left a widow and a grown-up family of four sons and six daughters, Messrs. P. J. J. J. and M. Brady; Misses M. A., E. J., R.E., B. M., M.E.; and C. A. Brady, all of whom reside at Barabba.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 24 July 1918 p 6 Article
Mr. Thomas O'Dea, whose death at Mount Pleasant occurred on Friday, was the oldest surviving resident of the neighborhood. He was a native of County Clare, and with four brothers and two sisters was brought to South Australia by his widowed mother 60 years ago. The family settled at Curly Creek, now Glen Devon, before the township of Mount Pleasant was formed. Afterwards Mr. O'Dea settled a mile or two to the south of the present township, towards Tungkillo. He was of a kindly disposition, and well liked in the district. Of late years he had been an invalid, though it was not till about five weeks ago that he took to his bed. The members of the family who survive are the widow (formerly Miss Annie Williams, a native of Somersetshire, four sons, Mr. John O'Dea Mount Pleasant; Mr. Thomas O'Dea (on active service); Mr. Michael O'Dea, Mount Pleasant; Mr. James O'Dea (a prisoner of war in Germany and four daughters, Mrs. Farrar, W .A.; Misses Fanny, Mary, and Annie O'Dea.

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Tuesday 30 July 1918 p 2 Article
Her many friends in this district will deeply regret to learn of the death of Mrs Mary Darcy, of South. Purrumbete, relict of the late Mr Patrick Darcy, who passed away at her residence, South Purrumbete, at 6 o'clock last Saturday evening. The late Mrs. Darcy, who was 72 years of age, had been a resident of South Purrumbete for the past 48 years and was predeceased by her husband 11 months ago. The deceased lady was well and widely known for her kind and generous disposition and sincere sympathy will be extended the bereaved relatives. Mrs Darcy was a native of County Clare, Ireland, but came to Australia as a girl. She leaves to mourn their loss one son (Mr M. Darcy, of South Purrumbete), and four daughters, Mrs R. B. Dawson, Geelong; Mrs A. Darcy, Cloven Hills; Mrs J. Darcy and Mrs G. M. Nicol, South Purrumbete, and sixteen grandchildren. The funeral will leave deceased's late residence at 11 o'clock this (Tuesday) morning, for the Camperdown Cemetery. Messrs Collie and Brennan have charge of the funeral arrangements.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 8 August 1918 p 6 Article
Mrs O'Callahan died at Baker's Flat, near Kapunda, on Friday, at the age of 83. She was born in Ballyvaughan, County Clare, in 1835, and was the eldest of the family of the late Mr John Conolan. In 1834 she arrived with her parents in South Australia, and settled at Kapunda, where her parents engaged in farming pursuits. Her husband, Mr Michael O'Callahan, died 23 years ago. Four years ago she met with an accident, and she had been an invalid since then. She left three sons (Messrs Martin and Michael O'Callahan, Kapunda, and Mr. John O'Callahan, Bower) and two unmarried daughters.

Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Monday 12 August 1918 Edition: EVENING p 2 Article
Mr THOMAS GLEESON. Mr Thomas Gleeson, Killarney, died at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr J. Conheady, Grasmere, on Friday at the age of 83 years. Deceased was one of the oldest residents of the.district, and was a native of County Clare, Ireland, his wife predeceasing him many years ago.

The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Tuesday 20 August 1918 Edition: DAILY. p 4 Article
The death occurred at Beaufort on Sunday (writes our correspondent) of a very old and highly respected resident of the district in the person of Mrs Bridget Green, relict of Wm. Green. Deceased was 79 years of age, and had been failing in health for some time. She was born in County Clare, Ireland, and was a Victorian colonist of 56 years' standing. The greater part of her life was spent in Beaufort district. Only a few weeks ago the late Mrs Green sold her farm near Trawalla, and removed to Beaufort. The deceased leaves a daughter and son, the latter (Mr M. Green) being a resident of Geelong. The remains are to be interred at Beaufort today (Tuesday).

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Monday 19 August 1918 p 1 Family Notices
DUGGAN. -On the 18th August, at his residence, Great Britain Hotel, Flinders street, Melbourne, Edmond, the dearly loved second son of Patrick and Ellen Duggan, of Backfield, county Clare, Ireland. R.I.P. No flowers.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 22 August 1918 p 9 Article
Another pioneer-Mrs Russell wife of Mr John H. Russell-passed away at her late residence, Russell Park, Broxburn, Darling Downs, on 17th instant. The deceased lady, who was 65 years of age, was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Queensland when only nine years of age. Until her marriage she lived with the Mullins family, of Drayton. She was married at the age of 21 years, at Toowoomba, the late Archbishop Dunne officiating. After her marriage she and her husband came to Broxburn, where they lived until her death. The late Mrs. Russell, like other sterling women who braved the trials and hardships of country life in the early days, bravely took her share of the burden, and won a large circle of friends by her happy and generous disposition. The large attendance at her funeral last Sunday, at the Pittsworth Cemetery was a tribute to the esteem in which she was held. A short service was conducted in St Stephen's Church by Rev. Father Ryan who paid a warm tribute to the deceased as a good wife, mother, and woman. The late Mrs. Russell was the mother of 10 children of whom six survive her, in addition to eight grandchildren. Two daughters are married- Mrs. M. Noonan, of Yarranlea Pitts worth and Mrs D P, Mackintosh of Glencairn, Southbrook. The remaining members of the family-Misses Mary and Ida, and Messrs. Robert and James-live at the old home.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Tuesday 3 September 1918 p 1 Family Notices
AITKEN-MACKAY -[Golden Wedding]-On the 3rd September, 1868, at the residence of Mr. Fredk. Mackay, Latrobe-street, Melbourne, by the Rev. Andrew Robertson, assisted by the Rev. John Anderson, John, eldest son of David and Elizabeth Aitken, Castlemaine, to Helena, daughter of Joseph and Eleanor Mackay, Kilaloe, County Clare, Ireland. Present address, the State Savings Bank, Castlemaine.

The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918) Wednesday 11 September 1918 p 2 Article
Mr Jeremiah Whelan, a very old and highly respected resident of Winchelsea district, died in Colac, at his son-in-law's (Mr Robt Kay) residence on Monday morning, at the advanced age of 88 years. Deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, a colonist of over 50 years. He carried on farming for a number of years in the Winchelsea district and about six years ago took up his residence in Colac. His wife predeceased him a few years ago and he leaves a grown family of three sons and five daughters. His body was laid to rest in the Roman Catholic portion of the Colac cemetery yesterday. The bearers were Messrs Robert Kay, jun., Jno. Chappel, jun., Jno. Kay, E. Kay (grandsons of deceased), Jno. Chappell, sen., Robt. Kay, sen., Jno. Maxfield, T. Lowther, T. Moloney and T. Lougran. The Rev. Father Kennelly conducted the service at the grave side and Mr George James had charge of the funeral arrangements.

The North Eastern Ensign (Benalla, VIC. : 1872 - 1938) Friday 27 September 1918 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Article
CR P. CUNNINGHAM, J.P. Another of our oldest residents-Mr Patk Cunningham-passed out of life on Friday last, after an illness extending over months, though during the greater part of his life time he enjoyed perfect health and was, considering his years, a hearty, active man - one of the best known figures in our midst. Originally a teacher under the old denominational system, he abandoned his profession nearly half a century ago, there after marrying at Jamieson in the golden days of that once flourishing place, and subsequently went on the land, securing a section at Warrenbayne, which, inspired by the memories of his homeland (Ireland) he christened " Shannon Vale,"' and on which he lived with his wife and family for some years. He ultimately sold Shannon Vale and came to reside in Benalla where he played an active part in hotelkeeping, storekeeping, and public life. For years he represented Warrenbayne riding in Benalla Shire Council, resigning that position quite recently on account of the weight of age (for he was 84 years old when he died) and rapidly declining health. For a time, too, he represented the Central riding in the council, and over a decade ago was appointed to the honorary bench, the duties of which position he discharged with impartiality and sagacity. In his other sphere of public life-that is, the field of local politics-he was zealous, industrious and considerate, whilst his educational qualifications raised him head, neck and shoulder above the average municipal councillor; and he possessed literary attainments of no mean order. He had a mind, too, well stocked with useful knowledge, and understood clearly the needs of the country of his birth, and the prejudices which operated against the progress of the Irish nation. An ardent Home Ruler, which he always had the courage to show without fearing an enemy, gave a tone of patriotism to his character which made him popular in the eyes of his own countrymen, at least, and a spirited advocate of what he conceived to be right in public administration was one of the qualities of a disposition which even his opponents in public life admired. In a private sense the deceased gentleman was kind-hearted, mellow, and agreeable, his well-furnished mind always enabling him to talk brilliantly on a great variety of intellectual subjects, while he always assumed a very humble air and an unpretentious manner. His humility, indeed, was so great that the real lustre of his life was enrobed by it. The late Mr. Cunningham, a native of County Clare (Ireland) and a widely known and deservedly respected citizen, did much good during his career, and was at all times regarded as a sterling and influential member of the H.A.C.B. Society, in which he held leading positions from time to time. By his death a widow, one son and a daughter are left to mourn the death of a good husband and father. The remains of the deceased were interred on Sunday last, the Rev. Father Dunn reading the burial service and Mr. Hanlon carrying out the mortuary arrangements.

Warwick Examiner and Times (St. Lucia, Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Saturday 28 September 1918 p 5 Article
Our readers will learn with deep regret, that Mrs. Catherine McFarlane, a very old resident of Emu Vale, passed away at her residence 0n Thursday. The late Mrs. McFarlane, who had been for 33 years a resident of Emu Vale, and who was one of its most respected pioneer residents, was aged 70 years. She was born in County Clare, Ireland, and she was married to her late husband in January, 1867, at Gilford, County Down. With her husband she arrived in Brisbane in the sailing vessel, Star Queen, about 1870. The late Mr. McFarlane first found employment at Ipswich, his trade being that of a blacksmith. After moving to various places he finally settled at Pittsworth, where he died about thirty years ago. Mrs. McFarlane then removed to Emu Vale, where her geniality of disposition and kindness of heart won for her many friends. She is survived by a family of eight. The daughters are Mrs. James Malone, Mallow, Stanthorpe; Mrs. John Doran, Freestone; Mrs. Washbourne, Pikedale; Mrs. Fred Holdsworth, near Dalveen; and Miss Kate McFarlane, Emu Vale. The sons are Mr. James McFarlane, Wynnum South; Mr. Robert MeFarlane, Mallow, Stanthorpe; and Mr. Peter McFarlane, Emu Vale. There is a large number of grandchildren. To the bereaved family we are sure the sincere sympathy of the whole community will go out. The funeral, which took place to the War wick cemetery yesterday afternoon, was largely attended. The Rev. Father Murphy, of Toowoomba, officiated at the graveside.

Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Tuesday 1 October 1918 p 2 Article
DEATH OF MR J. DOLAHENTY.

An old and much respected Maitland resident, Mr John Dolahenty passed away at Maitland Hospital early on Saturday morning at the ripe old age of 78 years. Deceased was born at Innis, County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia at the age of 19, residing in Maitland for the past 50 years. He was formerly engaged in the railway service, and retired about 12 years ago. His wife predeceased him 19 years ago, and he leaves four sons —Mark (Singleton), Gus (Maitland), Joe. who is on active service, and who, prior to enlisting, lived in Sydney, and Leo (Newcastle), to whom much sympathy is extended. Deceased was president of the St Vincent de Paul conference, and a member of the A.H.C. Guild since its inception, and he always took a great interest in all church movements in St. John's R. C. parish. The funeral took place at Campbell's Hill cemetery on Sunday afternoon, and was largely at tended by members of the Catholic bodies.

The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) Friday 11 October 1918 p 5 Article
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Hickey, of Goroke, who had together attained to the verge of nonogenarianism, died within three days of each other this week, and will lie side by side again on Saturday in their last resting place in the Horsham cemetery. The late Mr. Michael Hickey passed away on Monday at the age of 86 years at his residence, Goroke, and was brought into town on Tuesday evening. On the arrival of the train his remains were taken to the Roman Catholic Church of SS. Michael and John, where they were lodged until 3 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon; at which hour the funeral started for the grounds, where they were laid to rest by Rev. Father Howell. The pall bearers were Messrs. J. McGee, T. McGee, P. McGee and J. Clark. The burial obsequies were entrusted to Messrs. Oulton and Boyle. Three days later, on Thursday last, the widow, Mrs. Margaret Hickey, who had been greatly prostrated by the death of her husband, and never quite recovered from the shock, at the age of 87, one year his senior, followed her lifelong partner to the shadowy land, and will be buried in the same spot to-morrow. Both were natives of County Clare, Ireland, and came out together in the "fifties." They landed at port Adelaide, and subsequently went to Mt. Gambier; removing to Horsham in the "seventies" eventually settling down about 1884 at Goroke. The surviving members of the family are one daughter, Mary Ann; and three sons, Matthew, Michael and Martin, all well-known residents of Goroke.

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Tuesday 15 October 1918 p 2 Article
The death, occurred at Camperdown on Saturday last, of an old and very highly respected resident of this district in the person of Mrs. Williams, of Pomborneit, and formerly of Camperdown, relict of the late Mr. William Henry Williams. The deceased lady, who was 67 years of age, was a native of County Clare, Ireland. She came to Victoria 47 years ago, and had resided in this locality for many years. At one time she lived in Camperdown, but later removed to Pomborneit, where she held the position of postmistress up to the time of her death. Sincere and widespread sympathy will be felt for members of the family, among whom are Mrs. Josh. Paley, of Camperdown and Mrs. Densmore, of Pomborneit. The body was conveyed to Melbourne by yesterday morning's train. Messrs. Collie and Brennan had charge of the mortuary arrangements.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 17 October 1918 p 6 Family Notices
LEONARD. -0n October 7th, 1918, at her residence, Tallebudgera, Bridget Leonard, beloved wife of the late Patrick Leonard, native of County Clare, Ireland, in her 81st year. R.I.P.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) Wednesday 16 October 1918 p 3 Article
On Friday passed away at her daughter's (Mrs. Thomson's) residence, Factory street, Parramatta North, Mrs Ann Somers, late of the Wallsend district, aged 86 years. Mrs Somers had been ill for a long time. She was mother of Mrs. T. R. Moxham, widow of the late respected member for Parramatta. The funeral took place on Saturday morning. The burial service was conducted by the Rev. T. Hilhouse Taylor; and the arrangements in connection with the interment were in the hands of Messrs. Wm. Metcalfe and Co. Mrs. Somers was a native of County Clare, Ireland. She had lived, however in New South Wales for the last 62 or 65 years. She married Mr. Daniel Somers at the age of 23 years. She leaves a family of five sons and three daughters — one son of the family having predeceased his mother.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 25 October 1918 p 5 Family Notices
HYNES. -The Friends of the late Mr JOHN HYNES, son of the late Malachi Hynes, Mîltown, Malbay, County Clare, Ireland are invited to attend his Funeral to leave the Mortuary Station, Regent-street, city, This (Friday) MORNING at 10 o'clock, for Catholic Cemetery, Rookwood.
WOOD COFFILL. and COMPANY, LTD.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 25 October 1918 p 6 Family Notices
PYERS.-October 24 1918, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. J. Stanborough, Bridget Pyers (formerly Dunn), late of Clarence Town, West Maitland, and County Clare, Ireland, aged 100 years. At rest.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 31 October 1918 p 1 Family Notices
HORAN-GILLESPIE: -On the 25th September, at the Carmelite Church, Middle Park, by the Very Rev. Jos. A. Kindelan, O.C.C. Prior, Patrick, second eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Horan, of County Clare, Ireland to Mary, only daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. David Gillespie, of Berrigan, N.S.W.

Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954) Friday 1 November 1918 p 7 Article
While on leave in the United Kingdom, Sergeant-Major Behan visited his aged mother in County Clare, Ireland. One of his sons, Corporal John Patrick Behan, was killed at Bailleul on June 30 last, when the Huns broke through the Ypres lines and were threatening the Channel ports. Another son, Sergeant Thomas Behan, is still in the field with the 34th Battery.

Warwick Examiner and Times (St. Lucia, Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Wednesday 6 November 1918 p 2 Article
It is with deep regret that we announce the death of Mr. Patrick White, which took place at Kanimbla Private Hospital yesterday afternoon at the age of 65 years. The deceased was born in Newmarket, County Clare, Ireland, and arrived in Australia about 43 years ago. He first secured employment with the late Mr. Patrick Higgins at Sandy Creek, and after some time he went to Swan Creek where, before his marriage, he worked with the late Mr. James Campbell. Later he married Miss Gordon, and settled in the Emu Vale district. He was always a prominent figure at the annual celebrations of St. Patrick's Day, and took a keen interest in Irish step dancing, in which he was generally rocognised as a fine judge. Indeed his decisions in this respect were always highly regarded. His death removes one whose passing will be sincerely deplored by all who knew him. He was an expert tanner, and when in the prime of life was a noted ploughman throughout the district. About 18 months ago, through ill-health, be sold out his farm at Emu Vale and came to reside in town. He is survived by his widow and a family of twelve children, all of whom are grown up. The daughters are Mrs. B. M. Brennan, Wood-street; Mrs. M. Cawley, Emu Vale; Mrs. F. Kavney, Maryborough; Mrs. C. Roach, Toowoomba; Misses Gertie, Gladys, Irene, Muriel and Dorothy, while the sons are Messrs. James, Stanislaus and Patrick White, all of Warwick. The funeral is announced to leave his late residence in Acacia Lane to-day at 2.30 p.m. for St. Mary's Church and thence to the Warwick cemetery.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 13 November 1918 p 4 Article
Mrs. Julia Kain, who died recently, had lived in Eurelia for nearly 40 years. About two months ago, through failing health, she went to the Little Sisters of the Poor, Glen Osmond. She was 88 years old. She was well known all over the State. She was very active, and was always ready for a step or a jig. She was born in Enis, County Clare, where her husband died about 50 years ago.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 14 November 1918 p 4 Article
Mr. Michael Maloney, who died at Virginia at the age of 89, was one of the oldest and highly-respected residents of the district. He was a colonist of 66 years. Born in County Clare, he spent some years in Cape Colony and fought in the Kaffir war. He went to Western Australia, but at the first opportunity came on to Adelaide. For several years he was employed at Messrs. Primrose's brewery, but eventually took up land at Virginia, where he had lived for the last 50 years. His wife, the daughter of the late Mr. Noel Nash, died many years ago. He left two daughters (Mrs. D. Sheedy and Miss M. Maloney) and one son (Mr. M. Maloney), all of Virginia.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 16 November 1918 p 6 Article
Mr. Michael Maloney, a pioneer of the Virginia district, who had resided there for more than 50 years, has died. He came to South Australia in 1853, from the Cape of Good Hope. At the time of the Kaffir war, in 1852, he served in the militia, and was in a few of the actions on the Orange River. Mr. Maloney and a sister lived for a few years in Adelaide. He then purchased land close to Virginia, and a few years later bought a block, on which part of Virginia township is now built. Mr. Maloney was born in 1831, in County Clare, Ireland. He married the only daughter of the late Mr. Owen Nash. The family consists of two daughters and one son—Mrs. Daniel Sheedy, Miss Maloney, and Mr. M. Maloney.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 26 November 1918 p 6 Article
Mr. Daniel Quinlivan, sen., the oldest resident of Dry Creek, died last week. He was born in county Clare on October 29, 1828, and arrived in this State in the ship Isle of Thanet in 1854. He was employed in laying the first railway line from Adelaide to Port Adelaide, and also worked on the first reservoir at Hope Valley. He was afterwards employed by the Main Road Board in constructing the main North-road from Gepps' Cross to Gawler. He was appointed working over-seer of that portion of the road, a position he held for 30 years. He measured the main North-road from the General Post-Office, Adelaide, to Gawler, and I had mile posts erected, some of which are standing to-day. While overseer he often walked from Dry Creek to Gawler and back the same day, sometimes twice a week. He took a very keen interest in politics, and voted at the first election for the House of Assembly (at that time open voting) for the district of Yatala (now Barossa). He had voted at every election held in the district since. He considered this a duty. Twelve months after his arrival he married Miss Johanna Ryan, of county Clare, who arrived by the ship David Malcolm in 1854. He built the little cottage in which they were married and occupied it till his death, a period of 63 years. He leaves a widow, two sons, and two daughters - Messrs. John and Daniel Quinlivan, and Miss Mary E. Quinlivan, of Dry Creek, and Mrs. James Thompson, of Salisbury. There are 18 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Monday 9 December 1918 p 1 Family Notices
CLEARY. —On the 8th December, at his residence, Richardson street, Essendon, James, dearly beloved husband of Ellen, and loving father of Frank, Jack, Vera, and Mary, late of Bulla and County Clare, Ireland, aged 64 years. R.I.P.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 21 December 1918 p 14 Article
The National Trustee Company is applying for a reseal of the letters of administration of the estate of John McInerney, late of Blackmount, Tubler, County Clare, Ireland, farmer, who died on September 29, 1911, leaving personal estate in Victoria, valued at £4,961, to his widow and children.

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954) Thursday 9 January 1919 p 2 Article
Sister Mary Ignatius D'Arcy, of St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, died in that institution- on Sunday from pneumonia. For 42 years she was in charge of the men's medical ward, having particular charge of naval patients. She was a native of Killaloo, county Clare, Ireland. Sister D'Arcy (says the "Evening News") contracted the fatal disease from a patient whom she attended until no longer able to carry on her duties. [Mary D’Arcy born 1848 Ireland to parents, James and Margaret D’Arcy, entered Convent of Sisters of Charity 15 December 1876, died 3 January 1919. – moh]

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 18 January 1919 p 13 Family Notices
ELIJAH-AHERN. [Diamond Wedding.] -On the 18 January, 1859, at St. Mary's Church, Geelong by Rev. R. McCarthy, Richard Elijah, of Carnarvon, Wales, to Ann Ahern, of Ennis, County Clare, Ireland. Present address, Hamilton, Vic.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 25 January 1919 p 4 Article
The new Mother-General of the Sisters of St. Joseph was born in Crusheen, County Clare, and is the only daughter of the late Mr. Michael O'Brien, of Gawler (writes The Southern Cross). At the very inception of the order she joined. When troublous times came and the newly formed order had to seek shelter in Queensland for a few years, Sister Mary Laurence was one of the brave women who helped plant the order there. Her father died when she was 10 years of age, and her mother in 1897. She has many relatives in the State, as her mother was a sister of the late Mr. John McEwen, of Gawler, also of late Mr. Thomas McEwen, of Saddleworth and Franklin Harbour. [Veronica O’Brien, born 23 December 1853, Corrifin, County Clare to parents Michael O’Brien and Mary McEwen, entered Convent 15 February 1869, died 1 January 1945 at Kensington, NSW. – moh]

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 14 February 1919 p 3 Article
SOUTH-EASTERN BORDER, February 10.— Mr. John Breen, a local coursing enthusiast, has died at the age of 72 years. He was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and a colonist of 56 years, half a century of which had been spent at Camperdown, in farming. He has left a widow, nine sons, and four daughters. Three of the sons enlisted— Tpr. Michael Breen, the late Lieut. Gordon Breen, M.M., and Sgt. Leonard Breen.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Monday 17 March 1919 p 11 Article
St. Columba's Church, Wilston, which had been tastefully decorated by girl friends of the bride, was the scene of a pretty wedding on Saturday, March 1, when Mr. Patrick O'Halloran (third son of the late Mr. and Mrs. John O'Halloran, County Clare, Ireland) was married to Miss Hannah Coughlan (third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Coughlan, County Cork, Ireland). Rev. Father Fitzgerald officiated. In the unavoidable absence of her brother, the bride was given away by Mr. Jack Fitzgerald. She wore a pretty dress of Ivory crepe de Chine and georgette, made in pinafore effect, trimmed with silk lace and seed pearls, and finished at waist with large tulle bow. She also wore a mob cap and embroidered tulle veil (lent by her sister in-law, Mrs. Coughlan, Warwick), and carried a shower bouquet and wore a gold bangle (gifts from the bridegroom) Miss Nellie Coughlan (sister of the bride) acted as bridesmaid, and wore a dress of Apricot crepe de Chine made In coat frock style, relieved with lavender, and a smart hat of lavender and apricot georgette. Her shower bouquet and gold brooch were gifts from the bridegroom. Mr. Hugh Talty acted as best man. The bride's gift to the bridegroom was a gold signet ring. As the bride entered the church the "Wedding March" was played by Miss Agnes O'Keefe (organist), and during the signing of the register Miss Katie O’Keefe sang Rosewigs "Ave Maria." After the ceremony the guests were entertained at a wedding breakfast at a city cafe. The presents were numerous and valuable, and Included several cheques. On leaving for the honeymoon Mrs. O'Halloran wore a dress of navy bluee crepé de Chine relieved with champagne, and a hat of navy blue and champagne to match.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 11 April 1919 p 7 Article Illustrated
Mrs. Ann Harrison has died at the Newington Home, Parramatta River, Sydney, at the extraordinary age of 108 years. She came to Australia at the age of 28 from County Clare. Up to a few days before her death she was very active and in good health.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) Saturday 12 April 1919 p 6 Article
A GREAT AGE.
There has just died at Newington Asylum an old lady, Ann Harrison, widow, who had reached the great age of 108 years. Her birth place was county Clare, and she had been 80 years in Australia (60 in N.S.W. and 20 in Vic). Her father's name was Coleman Slattery, and her mother's maiden name Bridget Moran. She used to reside at Gladesvllle with Mrs. Sheppard. The old lady only entered the institution last year. Up to a few days before her death she was quite active and her mental faculties were fairly good.

Queanbeyan Age and Queanbeyan Observer (NSW : 1915 - 1927) Tuesday 15 April 1919 p 2 Article
108 Years Old. Mary Ann Harrison who died at the Newington Home, Parramatta River, last week was 108 years old. Coming to Australia in 1830, at the age of 28, she. had remained here up to the time of her death. She spent 60 years of her life in New South Wales and 20 years in Victoria. She was born in County Clare. Up to a few days before her death she was very active and in sound health.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 22 May 1919 p 6 Family Notices
CANNEY. -May 21, 1919, at Clare Cottage, Kellick-street, Waterloo, Ellen Canney, late of Kilnow, County Clare, Ireland, aged 70 years. R.I.P.

The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954) Friday 23 May 1919 p 2 Article
There passed away at Charters Towers on May 5, an old identity in the person of Mr Michael Mullins. The deceased was born in County Clare and came to this country 36 years ago. Both Mr Mullins and his wife have been great patriotic workers. Two of their sons have been killed at the front and one is returning invalided. Mr Mullins was in camp himself at Enoggera for three months, but was rejected as medically unfit for service.

Advocate (Burnie, Tas. : 1890 - 1954) Friday 20 June 1919 p 2 Article
The Last Rites.-On Saturday there were laid to rest in the Roman Catholic section of the General Cemetery the remains of an old and highly-respected identity, the late Mrs. John Enright. A native of County Clare, Mrs. Enright came to Tasmania in the ship Fortune, back in the fifties, and for over 60 years she has been a resident of the Deloraine district, where her kindly nature made a large circle of friends. Her husband predeceased her about 12 years ago. The Rev. P. O'Reilly officiated at the graveside.

The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Wednesday 2 July 1919 p 1 Family Notices
SMITH-- REIDY.-On June 17, 1919, at the Church of the Sacred Heart. Highgate, W.A., by the Rev. T. Masterton, Martin James Smith, of Joel-terrace, Mount Lawley, to Ella Reidy, for- merly of County Clare, Ireland.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 16 July 1919 p 1 Family Notices
O'LOUGHLIN. -On the 6th July, at Leongatha, Laurence, the dearly beloved husband of Ellen, and the loving father of Maggie (Mrs. Carton), John, William (A.I.F.), the late Michael (A.I.F.), Nellie, and Frank, aged 72 years. A native of County Clare, Ireland, and a colonist of 51 years. May his soul rest in peace.

Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954) Thursday 31 July 1919 p 4 Article
Another Old Pioneer Gone.

A correspondent writes:-In the death of John Langtree, of Gordonvale, whose remains were laid to rest in the Gordonvale Cemetery on Monday, North Queensland has lost another of the old pioneers. He was born in County Clare, Ireland, 76 years ago. He came to Australia with his parents 73 years ago then being only three years old when he landed in Australia. In the early seventies he came to North Queensland to the Palmer Goldfields, where he tried his luck at gold mining, From there he drifted to Cooktown, and carried on business there butchering. It was in Cooktown where he met his wife and married in 1880. From Cooktown he shifted to Port Douglas, and started carrying from Port Douglas to Herberton, Mount Albion, and other mining towns in the Hinterland. However, when the Chillagoe Company started to build their, railway line from Mareeba to Chillagoe, he gave up carrying, and settled in Mount Albion, where he again started mining. He stayed there until the mines closed down, and then shifted to Mount Garnet, where he worked for the Mount Garnet Company until that place closed down. He then shifted to Nymbool and worked with the Smith Greek Company until they ceased operations. From there he went to Mackay, but having been so long in the North, he could not be contented until he got back again, finally settling in Gordonvale, where he ended his days. He leaves a wife and ten children to mourn his loss, viz., Misses. K. and C. Langtree, Messrs. Tom and Vince Langtree, Mrs. E. P. Whereat (all of Gordonvale),-Mrs. ,H. Webster , and Mrs. S. Costigan (Mackay); Mr. R. Langtree (Boonmoo), Mr. G. Langtree (Mareeba); and Sergeant ?? Langtree, A.I.F., abroad.

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Thursday 7 August 1919 p 5 Article
MOTHER MACHREE. When Maurice Whelan wrote "Mother Machree," the play in which Denis Kehoe and his company commence their season at His Majesty's Theatre on Saturday evening, he had just returned from a trip to his boyhood's home in County Clare, from which he had been absent in the United States of America for twenty years. His trip home and the stories he heard afforded him an opportunity of dramatising certain events in the history of his own family….

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Tuesday 12 August 1919 p 3 Article
MR. W. F. CRENNAN.
An unusual number of the oldest residents of Mount Gambier are passing away this year, and Mr. William Francis Crennan, who died at the residence of his son, Mr. F. W. Crennan, Commercial-street East, Mount Gambier, yesterday afternoon, was one of them. Mr. Crennan had reached the great age of very nearly 89 years, and the causes of his death were really the weakness and infirmities of old age. Until some six weeks ago he enjoyed remarkably good health for a man of his age, partial blindness being his only ailment, and in his daily walks he was a familiar figure on the streets of the town. Most people knew him, and they had a cheerful word for him and he for them when they met. He was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, in 1830, and would have been 89 years of age if he had lived till next Christmas. He was intended for the priesthood, and was educated with that end in view at the Christian Brothers' College in Kilkenny. Circumstances intervened, however, and the intention did not materialise. But Mr. Crennan kept himself well up-to-date by intelligent reading, and being a good conversationalist a talk with him was very interesting. He was ready to converse on any general subject that might arise, and hold his side up well. He was married in County Clare, Ireland, to Miss Catherine McMahon, in 1854, and four years afterwards came to Australia with his family, landing in Melbourne. He joined the police force on his arrival in that city, and being a man of over 6ft. in stature made an excellent trooper. After a time he was sent to the Heywood Station, and in 1860 while there resigned his connection with the force, and came to Mount Gambier. Since then he continued to reside in this district. For a good many years he was engaged in farming in Mount Gambier East. His wife died 17 years ago, and Mr. Crennan then retired from farm work, and came to the town to live. He had three children, and two sons--Messrs. Henry A. Crennan and Frederick W. Crennan, of Mount Gambier--survive him. He also leaves 10 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Four of his grandchildren— Messrs. Jack, Fred, George, and James Crennan--are living in the Riverina district of New South Wales and two are in Melbourne. The deceased retained remarkable vigor of mind to the last and just before he died was able to recognise all who were about him. The family desire to acknowledge the great kindness of the Right Rev. Mons. Ryan, who was very attentive to him during his last illness. Mr. Crennan was a loyal attendant at and supporter of St. Paul's Church, Mount Gambier. He was not a member of any benefit society, but was connected with several church and other agencies in the town. The funeral was held this afternoon, and was attended by a large number of friends of the family. The Right Rev. Mons. Ryan officiated at the grave-side.

Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Hobart, Tas. : 1890 - 1922) Tuesday 2 September 1919 p 2 Article
The Western District (Vic.) has lost one of its best spinners of early days' stories by the death of Mr Patrick Goonan, of Colac. He was ninety-seven, and had been in Australia since he was twenty. A retentive memory fitted him for the role of the oldest inhabitant, and his support for the labor party was voiced with the vigor which might be expected seeing that he was a native of County Clare.

Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) Friday 5 September 1919 Edition: EVENING p 2 Article
The death of an old resident Mr. Thomas Kinnane, occurred on Tues day at his residence, North Hamilton. The deceased, who had attained the age of 64 years, was born near Ennis, County Clare. Ireland, and was a colonist of 64 years, 53 of which he spent in Hamilton.

Advocate (Burnie, Tas. : 1890 - 1954) Wednesday 3 September 1919 p 1 Article
The correspondent of the London "Daily Express" at Ennis (County Clare) states that the congregations in several instances walked out of the churches, resenting the denunciations by the priests of the recent outrages. After preaching at Cooraclare, where seven residences were riddled with bullets, Father Heir, the parish priest, was obliged to retire hastily to his presbytery and secure a rifle for self-protection. He makes his parochial visits in an army motor car. Cardinal Logue (Archbishop of Armagh) in a speech al Queenstown, declared that anyone committing a crime became the enemy of Ireland, strengthening the military rule.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 4 September 1919 p 1 Family Notices
COYNE.—On the 3rd September, at his residence, 8 Regent street, Yarraville, Martin Stephen, the dearly beloved husband of Bridget Coyne, and loving father of Mrs. P. O'Bryan, Pat, Jack, Mrs. J.A. Sawyer, Joe, Leo, Tom, Kathleen, Rita, and the late William Coyne, beloved son- in-law of the late William O'Driscoll, County Clare, Ireland, aged 75 years.
May his soul rest in peace.

The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Saturday 20 September 1919 p 1 Family Notices
ALLPORT.—On September 12, at Wagin, Mary Ann, dearly-beloved wife of A. K. Allport, of Lake Grace eldest daughter of Mr. Patrick Corry and the late Mrs. Margaret Corry, of County Clare, Ireland, and sister of Sister Lawrence, St. Joseph's Convent, Northam; aged 25 years. [Delia/Bridget Corry, born 6 February 1895 at Clohanmore, County Clare to parents Patrick Corry and Margaret McMahon, entered SJA Convent 8 December 1912, died 12 December 1972. – moh]

Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Thursday 27 November 1919 p 2 Article
DEATH OF MR. PETER M'DONNELL.
Mr Peter M'Donnell, a well-known and highly-respected resident of the district, was found dead on his property, "Clare Berry" Liddell, on Monday afternoon. The deceased was out riding, and apparently fell off his horse owing to a sudden seizure, death being due to heart trouble. He had been in ill-health for some considerable time, and was recently an inmate of the Dangar Cottage Hospital, from which he was discharged about a week prior to his death. The late Mr M'Donnell was a native of county Clare, Ireland, and came to N.S. Wales in 1864, settling at Liddell two years later, where he had since resided as a farmer and grazier. The deceased's wife predeceased him in September, 1917, and he leaves three sons, Messrs John T. (Singleton), Peter (Boolaroo), and Joseph (Liddell), and two daughters, Mesdames C.Cook (Cessnock) and G. Ayres (Jerry's Plains). The remains were conveyed to Singleton and interred in the Catholic cemetery on Tuesday afternoon.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) Saturday 29 November 1919 p 6 Article
On 23rd, Martin Patrick Lysaght, at his late residence Sorrell-street, Parramatta North, aged 87 years. He was a very old identity and his wife predeceased him by many years. Interred on 24th in the R.C. cemetery, Parramatta North. He was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and had resided in Parramatta district 50 years.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Friday 5 December 1919 p 6 Article
Death of a Centenarian.
The death took place in Warwick on Wedncsday night of Mrs Bridget Devitt, widow of the late Mr. T. J. Devitt, at the age of 101 years. The deceased lady was born in County Clare, Ireland, in January, 1818. Her eldest sons left for Australia, and, in course of time, the parents followed. Mr. and Mrs. Devitt arrived in Warwick in 1890, and Mr. Devitt died in 1912. The surviving sons are Messrs William F. Devitt (Railway Department, Brisbane), Matthew Devitt (Sydney), Martin Devitt (United States), James Devitt (West Australia), and Thomas and Patrick Devitt, (Ireland). Mrs Carey, Zillmere, is a daughter. Two other sons, Michael and Austin Devitt, predeceased their mother.

Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954) Tuesday 23 December 1919 p 2 Article
LATE MRS. WORDLY.
The death took place on Thursday last, at the residence of her daughter, M'Kinnon-street, Camperdown, of Mrs. Wordly. The deceased lady had reached the advanced age of 83 years and was well-known and highly respected throughout the district. She had formerly resided at Woorndoo and later at Cobra Killuc, near Hexham. A native of County Clare, Ireland, she had lived in Victoria for 60 years. Six daughters and two sons, who will have the sympathy of a large circle of acquaintances, survive her. Mr. W. Wordly, of Boorcan, is a son and Mrs. Gibson, of M'Kinnon-street, Camperdown, a daughter. The late Mrs. Wordly had been predeceased by her husband over 20 years ago. The remains were conveyed to Hexham on Friday last and laid to rest in the Church of England portion of the cemetery there. The Rev. Thomas Cole, of Mortlake, conducted the Church service.

The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954) Monday 12 January 1920 p 4 Article
An old identity of the Mackay district in the person of Patrick Hughes, passed away on Monday last. The deceased was 75 years of age, and a native of County Clare, Ireland. He came to Australia with his parents when about eight years of age. Mr. Hughes married at Ipswich in 1872, and came to Mackay 38 years ago, taking up a selection on Alligator Creek. He had resided round that district ever since, and was well known and highly esteemed. Deceased is survived by six daughters and three sons.

Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Hobart, Tas. : 1890 - 1922) Monday 12 January 1920 p 3 Article
PEDESTRIANISM.
DEATH OF A GREAT ATHLETE.
Died recently in Sydney T. M. Malone, regarded as one of the greatest pedestrians ever seen on the track. He was born in County Clare, Ireland, and was at one time the amateur champion of that country. It was in Australia, however, that he did his greatest running feats as a professional. In his prime he was one of the greatest all-round athletes Australia has seen, and certainly has not been surpassed by any contemporary as an all-round runner. The following tribute to his great qualities as an athlete is paid by Sir Frank S. Hewitt, the veteran English star of the sixties and seventies, who met Malone in Australia nearing the termination of his own career on the track: "Since 1865 I have seen and run against all the best men in England— I am speaking of men who could run from 50 yards to 1000 yards. First, Jim Nuttall, Sia Alverson, Dick Buttery, Rid ley, Bob Hindle of Paisley, Hayward of Rochdale, Tudsley Walsh, and Lou Myers (amateur and professional-, not one of them could duplicate the whole of Malone's performances at the distances mentioned. I do not mention the other four great champions. Anyhow, I know Samuels and Hutchens could not run up to these distances. I do not know if the other two great champions, Donaldson and Postle, could, so I do not and cannot include them with those I knew could run up to a 1000 yards fast and well. I have always thought that Malone has never been given the credit due to him. His race of 250 yards at Botany, round two corners in 25½ secs., was one of the best performances I ever saw - Malone beaten by a foot, and Hutchins all out. I have no hesitation in saying Malone was one of the best middle distance runners the world has seen, or ever will see. He was a good-hearted, good-natured, good fellow. I trust he is at peace."

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Friday 16 January 1920 p 4 Article
MR. PATRICK M. KAIN.
The death on Tuesday of Mr. Patrick Mark Kain, farmer, of "Greenbank", Mount Gambier, is announced in the "Watch" to-day. He was 69 years of age. Mr, Kain was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia In the ship David McCallum, at the age of 7 years. He spent the early portion of his life in the Millicent district. In the early Eighties he selected land on the old Zarrock Station, Lillimur District, Victoria, where he carried on farming successfully for 17 years. Twenty years ago he returned to Mount Gambier, and purchased land at Glencoe, which property he owned to the last. He settled at "Green- bank", Mount Gambier, some six years ago. The deceased was a son of the late Michael and Brigid Kain, of Millicent; and was a brother of Mr. John Kain, Avenue Dale, Victoria, Mr. Jas. Kain, Millicent, the late Mr. Thomas Kain, Nhill, Mrs, Geoghan, Adelaide, the late Mrs. Burchard, Tantanoola, and Mrs. O'Dea, Mlllicent. Thirty-three years ago he married Mary, daughter of the late John and Mary Power, of Millicent, who survives him. He had no family. The funeral of the deceased was held on Monday afternoon. The Rev. Father Brady officiated at the graveside.

The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) Friday 23 January 1920 p 6 Article
The news of the death on Wednesday last of Mrs. Catherine White, of Mount Pleasant, near Minyip, was learned with keen regret by the residents of the district. The deceased was one of the earliest pioneers of the Wimmera, and had attained the ripe age of 87 years. Kindheartedness, thoughtfulness, and cheerfulness were distinctive qualities of the deceased, and there are few indeed who possessed such wonderful vigor. Up to the last her mental faculties were perfect, and she was conscious to the end. The duration of illness was comparatively brief, for it was only on the Thursday previous that she took ill. The late Mrs. White was born in County Clare, Ireland. and came to Victoria when about 21 years of age. A year or two later she was married to Mr. James White. They came to the Wimmera over 40 years ago.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 19 February 1920 p 6 Article Illustrated
An old and respected resident of the Hawker district in Mr. John Moller, sen., passed away after a lingering illness at the residence of his eldest daughter, Mrs. M. A. Rowe. He was 88 years of age, and was a colonist of 61 years. He was born at Bornholm, a small island off the coast of Denmark, and arrived in South Australia in the ship Halborg in 1858. He had previously spent 14 years at sea. In 1859 he married Miss Catherine Malony, of County Clare, Ireland, who predeceased him 18 years. Mr. Moller lived in various places in South Australia, and spent the last 40 years in the Hundred of Wonoka, near Hawker. He has left two sons— Mr. John Moller, of Trickett, near Coolamon, New South Wales, and Mr. George James Moller, of Hawker— and two daughters — Mrs. M. A. Rowe. of Hawker, and Mrs. K. M. Sheridan, of Gladstone. There are 19 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 9 April 1920 p 6 Article
Mr. Martin Bartholomew McNamara, an old and respected resident of Port Lincoln, died recently at his residence. Mr. McNamara was born in 1837 in County Clare, Ireland, and he went to the Cape of Good Hope in 1859, where he married, and sailed for South Australia in the ship Seashell in 1863. Most of his life was subsequently spent in Port Lincoln, where he was engaged in various pursuits. At the formation of the district council he occupied the position of road inspector, which, he relinquished 13 years ago; and lived in quiet retirement with his invalid wife and daughter. There are three other daughters and a son.

Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 - 1954) Tuesday 20 April 1920 Edition: DAILY p 6 Article
The death occurred at his residence, Trevallyn, yesterday afternoon of Mr. Patrick B. Dugan, after a lengthy illness. Born at Dennis, County Clare, Ireland, 88 years ago, be came out to Tasmania at the age of 14 years and settled with his parents at Hobart. About 56 years ago he came to Launceston, where he has since resided. He conducted a footwear establishment, but about 30 years ago he retired from business. Mr. Dugan evinced a keen interest in political matters many years ago, and on one occasion was an unsuccessful aspirant for the South Esk seat in the House of Assembly. This was before the grouped electorates came into vogue. For some years he was a prominent member of the Rechabite order, while in his early days he was an enthusiast in music, being a member of St. Joseph's Band and various orchestral societies for a considerable time. Deceased was one of the pioneers of Upper Trevallyn, and when he went to live in that suburb in 1882 there was only one other house on the whole of the hill. He was the eldest surviving resident of that part. He married 56 years ago Miss Harriett Giles, of Hobart, who survives him, together they had one daughter, Mrs. J. F. Sheargold, Trevallyn, and one son, Rev. C. C. Dugan, M.A., of Hobart.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 27 April 1920 p 4 Article Illustrated
Mr. Patrick Kelly, an old colonist, who carried on grazing and farming pursuits on the Victorian side of the border (writes our Narracoorte correspondent), died in Adelaide last Tuesday. He was born in County Clare. Ireland 63 years ago, and came to South Australia when 18 years of age. In his earlier days he worked in the Mount Gambier, Penola, and Narracoorte districts, and subsequently took up land between Edenhope and Goroke (Victoria), where he resided with his wife and family, and carried on farming and grazing for a number of years. About eight years ago Mr. Kelly leased his land and went to Narracoorte to reside. He was of a quiet but genial disposition. A widow and an adult family of three survive.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 1 July 1920 p 9 Article
Mr. W. Curry, sen. (station master at Pengarry Junction) who died in Toowoomba on Monday was born in County Clare Ireland and joined the Railway Department in Queensland in 1881. He had occupied the position of station-master at Pengarry Junction for the past 23 years. The deceased is survived by his widow, five sons and two daughters. The sons are Daniel (station-master at Macalister), Norman (clerk in the Railway Commissioner's office Brisbane), William (assistant station master at Millhill), Lawrence (night officer at Cotton Vale), James (lad porter at Gowrie Junction). The daughters are Mrs T J Hanrahan (Westbrook) and Mrs W. Andrews (Lake's Creek).

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 1 July 1920 p 6 Family Notices
ROWAN.—June 30, at the Royal Hotel, Randwick, Margaret Alice Rowan, dearly loved sister of Mrs. McKelrey, Susie, Stephen, and Ellie Rowan, of Randwick, also of Mother Mary Phillp and John Rowan, County Clare, Ireland. R.I.P.

ROWAN.—June 30, at the Royal Hotel, Randwick, Margaret Alice Rowan, dearly loved daughter of the late Matthew and Ellen Rowan, Lislanahan House, Kilkee, County Clare, Ireland. R.I.P.

The North Eastern Ensign (Benalla, VIC. : 1872 - 1938) Friday 30 July 1920 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article
MRS MORONEY Mrs Honora Moroney, one of the oldest residents of Bungeet, died at her residence on the 22nd inst., at the age of 88 years, her husband-the late Mr. John Moroney-having gone the way of all flesh nearly three decades back. The late Mrs Moroney, along with her late husband, settled at Bungeet 45 years ago, being previously residents of Wallan Wallan, near Kilmore, residing on a neat and well-equipped farm where she lived up to her demise. She was a native of County Clare (Ireland) and came to Australia in 1862, having married three years previously, and witnessed most of the pioneering life of the district. Blessed with a good family, she prospered and added consider ably to her holding even after her husband's death. She was the mother of four sons- Messrs Patrick, John, James and Thomas- and well known and deservedly respected among her neighbors, especially the old pioneers. She was an ideal wife, mother and neighbor. Her death will be heard of with regret by many old friends and neighbors whom time and circumstances have scattered over the Commonwealth. Her remains were interred in Benalla cemetery on Saturday, the burial service being read by Father O'Reilly, PP., Mr Abbott carrying out the mortuary arrangements.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 4 August 1920 p 9 Article
LATE MR. T. J. VAUGHAN.
ESTATE VALUED AT £27.027.
Probate has been granted of the will of Mr. Thomas Joseph Vaughan, of Mansfield- street, Glebe, who had carried on business as a draper at 766 George-street, Sydney, and who died at Melbourne on April 27 last. The testator appointed his niece, Nellie Vaughan, and Messrs. John Vaughan and John Darcy, executrix, executors, and trustees of his estate, the net value of which was sworn as £27,627, of which £16,420 represented realty. He bequeathed £500 to John Darcy (manager of his business), £50 to James Nolan, of Concord, £200 to Catherine Fogarty, of Elizabeth-street, Waterloo, certain legacies and devises to relatives, £25 each to St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney Hospital, Lewisham Hospital, Community of the Little Sisters of the Poor at Randwick, Waitara Foundling Home, North Sydney, and the Westmead Boys' Home; £50 to St. James' R.C. Church, Forest Lodge, £100 to St. Patrick's College, Manly; £200 to the poor of the parish of Milltown, County Clare, Ireland (testator's native town), and £600 to the fund for the propagation, preservation, and advancement of the Gaelic Irish language in Ireland. The residue of the estate the deceased bequeathed to certain relatives. Directions were given to the trustees with respect to the drapery business.

Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954) Tuesday 10 August 1920 p 8 Article
DEATH OF HON. B. FAHEY
FORMERLY SUB COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS.
BRISBANE, August 8
The Hon. Bartley Fahey, M.L.C. passed away unexpectedly to-night. Mr. Fahey was born at New Quay county Clare, Ireland, on the 16th. October, 1836, and was, therefore, in his eighty-fourth year. He came to Brisbane in 1858. He followed various vocations until 1860, when he joined the Customs Department at Maryborough. Eight years later he was transferred to Townsville as second Customs officer and Shipping Master. In 1872 he was appointed the Collector and Harbour Master in charge of the Gulf Customs. Three years later he was transferred to Cooktown as Senior Collector, Water Police Magistrate, and Harbour Master. In 1885 he was appointed to Rockhampton as Senior Sub-Collector of Queensland and Water Police Magistrate. He retired from the service in 1903 and was appointed in that year the Legislative Council. Mr. Fahey was very energetic and in his day acquired some fame as an athlete. It is but few days ago that he walked vigorously into the Legislative Council, Parliament House, to assist in the reception to the Prince of Wales. He is survived by Mrs. Fahey and three children, one of whom, Mr. B. Fahey, is a barrister, practising in Brisbane. The news of Mr. Fahey's death will be received with genuine feelings of regret by a very wide section of the residents of Rockhampton. During his long residence in the town he took a very large interest in all public movements, and particularly in sport. The sympathy of those who had the pleasure of his acquaintance will be extended to the members of the family in their bereavement.

Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 - 1954) Saturday 14 August 1920 Edition: DAILY p 8 Article
Another of the north-western pioneers passed away on Thursday night, in the person of Mrs. Mary Ann Flight, in her 88th year (says our Devonport correspondent). Deceased was the wife of Mr. F. J. Flight, of the Forth, the couple being the oldest residents of the place, and most highly respected by all. The late Mrs. Flight was born in county Clare, Ireland, and came out to Tasmania in the emigrant ship Beulah to Hobart in 1851. She was married to Mr. Flight in 1857 by special license. The couple then came along the coast, where they have resided for 62 years. Mr. Flight in the early days conducted the coach business to Emu Bay and the Mersey, and will be 92 years of age next Monday. The sincerest sympathy is felt for him in his sad loss of a devoted wife and the mother of a grown-up family.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 18 August 1920 p 6 Article
An old and highly respected resident of Glenelg, Mr. Patrick Healy, died at the North Adelaide Hospital on Tuesday afternoon, after a short illness which followed upon an operation. The late Mr. Healy was born in County Clare, Ireland, 74 years, ago, and came with his parents to South Australia when he was 18 years of age. After trying his luck at gold mining in Victoria and Gympie (Q.) with indifferent success, he returned to Adelaide, and started business as a bootmaker. For many years his shop was a well-known landmark in Hindley street; but subsequently for 30 years he conducted a successful business at No. 3 Rundle street. The late Mr. Healy, who was always a keen supporter of Home Rule for Ireland, for many years filled the position of President of the United Irish League of South Australia, in which capacity he received and welcomed the late Mr. William Redmond and Mr. Devlin on the occasion of their visit to South Australia shortly before the war broke out. Mr. Healy, ac companied by his wife (who predeceased him by about a year) and a daughter, visited Ireland, and were in London when war was declared. During a visit to the land of his birth he was welcomed by leaders of the Irish party and was entertained by many prominent Home Rulers. In his younger days Mr. Healy was a leading member of the Adelaide Philharmonic Society, and took great interest in musical matters. He possessed a fine voice, was a popular singer at St. Francis Xavier's Cathedral, and for a considerable time conducted a choir at St. Mark's Church, Glenelg, in which he was ably assisted by members of his family. For the past seven years he had taken considerable interest in bowling, and was a prominent member of the Glenelg Bowling Club. He resided for more than 40 years at Glenelg, where he was a popular citizen and always ready to assist any philanthropic object or any movement for the advancement of the town. He has left two brothers— Mr. Martin Healy (Money Order Office, G.P.O.) and Mr. Michael Healy (Forestville); three sons— Messrs. R Healy (head master of the Moonta Mines Public School), Mr. B. Healy (in charge of the Rundle street business), and Mr. Kevin Healy, late of the A.I.F. (of the Crown Solicitor's Office); three daughters— Misses L. and A. Healy, and Mrs. A. J. Morony (Parkside); six grandsons, and two grand daughters.

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954) Thursday 26 August 1920 p 1 Article
The Sydney correspondent of "The Miner" telegraphs that Mr. John Meagher, M.L.C. died in St. Vincent's Private Hospital this morning in his 85th year. A native of Kilrush, County Clare, Ireland, he came to Australia when a young man. He was one of the loading spirits in the western district for over half a century, and had been a resident of Bathurst for 53 years.

The North Eastern Ensign (Benalla, VIC. : 1872 - 1938) Friday 27 August 1920 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article
MRS MARGARET STANLEY. The death occurred last Thursday at her residence in Caulfield of Mrs Margaret Stanley relict of the late Edward Montrose Stanley of Samaria. Deceased, who was born at Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, was a daughter of the late Patrick O'Farrell, Benalla, and came to Melbourne with her parents in 1852. After a short stay on the Bendigo diggings, they went up country and settled at Mansfield. Five years later Mr O'Farrell purchased land at what was then known as the "Yellow Waterhole" where he lived until his death. Deceased married the late Edward Stanley of Samaria, at Benalla in 1864. Mr Stanley was at that time in the police force and was stationed here. In 1883 he retired from the force, and settled in Samaria where he died in 1897. Shortly after his death Mrs Stanley leased her property, and went to Melbourne, where she resided up to the time of her demise a few days ago. The deceased lady was of a kindly disposition, and endeared herself to all who knew her. She was widely known and respected and leaves a grown up family of sons and daughters for whom much sympathy is felt in their sad bereavement.

MRS BRIDGET COURTNEY The death is announced of a very old former resident of Killawarra in the person of Mrs Bridget Courtney, who died at her residence Swann-st, Wangaratta, the cause of death being heart failure. Deceased was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia in 1853, where she married her late husband at Bacchus Marsh. Deceased was widely known at Killawarra, and many friends regret the news of her demise.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Tuesday 31 August 1920 p 1 Family Notices
MCINERNEY. -On the 28th August, 1920, at her residence, 26 Mercer road, Malvern, Ellen Mclnerney, daughter of the late Morgan McInerney, esquire, County Clare, Ireland, loving and devoted friend of the Carey, Fretag, and Keogh families. (Privately interred, Springvale, 30th inst.).

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Tuesday 7 September 1920 p 3 Article
MR. MICHAEL O'CONNOR.
A pioneer of this district, and father of the well-known Mount Gambier amateur riders, in the person of Mr. Michael O'Connor, of Sutton Town, has joined the great majority, He had attained the ripe age of 78 years, and had enjoyed a healthy life right up to the last. His death took place at the Mount Gambier hospital on Friday last from heart failure. The late Mr. O'Connor was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to Australia when a young man of about 20 years of age. After spending a few years in Queens- land he came on to Mount Gambier, where he remained over since--a term of over 50 years. At Mount Gambier the deceased married Miss Katherine Burbidge, who survives him. There were eight children, seven of whom are living. They are Messrs. Hugh, John (deceased), Michael, James, Herb, and Edward O'Connor, Miss Katherine O'Connor, and Mrs. M. Ryan (Snuggery). The deceased was engaged in farming all his life, and he took a great interest in race horses and hunters. He was a good rider which accomplishment he retained al- most to the end--and his sons after him have proved their ability as riders. The funeral, which took place on Sunday afternoon, was an evidence of the popularity of the deceased, the cortege being about three-quarters of a mile in length. A beautiful wreath from the Mount Gambier Hunt Club was placed on the grave. The Rev. Mons. Ryan conducted the funeral service, and Mr. G. Lewis carried out the arrangements.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 15 September 1920 p 9 Article Illustrated
Mr. John Kearne, who died at Kapunda on Friday, was well known and respected. Born in County Clare 72 years ago, he came to South Australia when 16 years of age. He took up his abode at Kapunda, and after a few years there went to the Gympie gold diggings in Queensland. On his return he took up land at St. John's, near Kapunda, and carried on farming operations for a number of years. After-wards he started in business as an hotel keeper, and kept houses at Marrabel, Hamley Bridge, Redhill, Booleroo Centre, Laura, and Kapunda. Eight years ago he retired. In Kapunda he served for six years in the municipal council, and took an active interest in town matters. In his youth he was one of the best step-dancers of the district. He left a widow, three sons (Messrs. P. J. Kearne, Waikerie, John Kearne, Peterborough, and Thomas Kearne, Kapunda), and five daughters (Mesdames Keiley, Krone, M. Dermody, and M. Fitzpatrick).

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 22 October 1920 p 9 Article
Mrs. Katherine Driscoll, who died recently, was an old and highly esteemed resident of Kapunda. She was born in County Clare, Ireland, 76 years ago, and came to Australia in the ship Tarquin, landing in December, 1864. She went direct to Kapunda, and two years later married Mr. Patrick Driscoll, who predeceased her. With the exception of 13 years spent at Eudunda, she lived the remainder of her life in Kapunda. A family of four sons and four daughters survive. They comprise Messrs, Thomas, John, and William (Port Augusta) and P. H. Driscoll (Kapunda); and Mesdames Willis (Kalgoorlie), Dwyer and Mullen (Port Augusta), and Nurse Driscoll (Kapunda).

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 5 November 1920 p 10 Article
DEATH OF AN OLD RESIDENT. Hamley Bridge. November 3.

Mr. John McMahon, an old resident, died on Thursday. He arrived in this State from County Clare in 1866. Shortly afterwards he married Miss Bridget McNamara. There were six children, all of whom are dead. He took up farming in the Mudla Wirra district, where he also conducted a private school. After few years there he entered the service of the Education Department, and was the first master in charge of the Hamley Bridge State School. In 1898, after 12 months' leave of absence he took charge of the Undalya School, and from there he retired, and returned to Hamley Bridge where he lived till his death at the age of 80. All his life he was a sportsman, and right up to the time of his last illness was in the habit of taking his gun to shoot foxes or hares. In his younger days he was a prominent member of the Hamley Bridge Gun Club, and in the year 1884 won the silver cup for pigeon shooting. He left a granddaughter and two great-grandsons, with whom he was living at the time of his death.

Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954) Friday 5 November 1920 p 9 Article
The death of Mrs. Thomas Quinn, of North Richmond, occurred, suddenly at her home on Tuesday, October 26th. Mrs. Quinn had been a great sufferer from neuritis during the past two years. On the day of her death she was brighter than usual, chatting with the other members of the family. She collapsed at 8 p.m., and expired in a few moments. The late Mrs. Quinn was of a most lovable nature, and was highly esteemed by all who knew her. She unselfishly, devoted her life to the welfare and happiness of her husband and children, by whom she was lovingly cared for during her years of sickness. The deceased was born in county Clare, Ireland, in 1846, and came to Australia with her uncle and aunt when eighteen years of age. She resided in Victoria, and in the year 1869 married, at Ballarat, Thomas Quinn, who, survives her. Coming to New South Wales the family have since resided in the Hawkesbury district. There are seven children of the marriage, four boys and three girls: John Thomas (who is in business in Leichhardt), Mrs. E. C Warner, of Sydney; Mrs. M. Horan, of Richmond; Mr. J. F. J. Quinn, of Sydney; and Nicholas, Edward, and Katie, who reside at home. Many beautiful wreaths were sent including one from the C.I. Branch, Police Department, Sydney. The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon of last week, the arrangements being carried out by Mr. A. Price, of Richmond.

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 3 December 1920 p 9 Article
LATE MR. J. MEAGHER, M.L.C.
BEQUESTS TO CATHOLIC INSTITUTIONS.
Probate has been granted to the will of the late Mr. John Meagher, M.L.C., merchant, of Bathurst, who died on August 29. The estate has been sworn for purposes of probate at £44,736. The testator made many bequests to Roman Catholic institutions, relatives, and friends. After directing payments of these bequests, and giving directions for the distribution of certain shares in companies standing in his name between his sons Martin Meagher and Michael Meagher and Eileen Meagher (a granddaughter), testator bequeathed the residue of his estate in equal shares to his sons, Martin, Patrick, Peter, and Michael, the two last named being appointed executors of the will. Bequests of £1000 are made to Norah Heaphy, a second cousin of testator, daughter of R. Heaphy, of Ballinacally, County Clare, Ireland; the Mother Superior of the Orphanage at Bathurst, for the benefit of the institution; and to the Roman Catholic Bishop and the Mother Superior of the Convent of Mount St. Joseph, Bathurst, on trust, the income from the devisement to be devoted to the maintenance of any postulant of the Order of the Sisters of Mercy from time to time at the discretion of the Mother Superior of the convent.
To each of the following the testator bequeathed gifts of £500:-John Heaphy, of County Clare, Ireland; and Margaret Heaphy, of Lanhinch, County Clare, Ireland. To John Mahoney, of Temora (his nephew), testator left £400 Bequests of £200 are left to the Superior of the Patrician Brothers at Bathurst, and to the Superior of St. Stanislaus' College, Bathurst. Bequests of £100 are made to Mrs. Martin Meagher, Thomas Mangan, of Bathurst; Doat Heaphy, of Kildare, Ireland; Violet Cusack, niece of John Heaphy, County Clare, Ireland; the poor of the town of Kilrush, Ireland; and the Superioress of the Convent of the Sisters of Mercy at Kilrush; the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Rose Bay, Sydney; the Convent of Sisters of St. Joseph, Bathurst; the Convent at Temora; Joseph Mahoney, of Forbes; Mary Devine (a niece), of Sydney; Peter Meagher (a grandson), of Temora, in fulfilment of a promise given to the beneficiary when a little boy; to each of the daughters (14 in number) of his sons Patrick, Peter, and Michael Meagher.
Beneficiaries to the extent of £50 each are: The Bathurst Hospital, the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Bathurst; Mary McDermott (a niece), of Sydney; Patrick Dwyer; Mrs. Kathleen Kirby, of Kilrush, Ireland; the Roman Catholic Bishop of Bathurst; the Poor Relief Society of Bathurst; the convents at West Wyalong, Barmedman, and Forbes; the Trappist Monastery at Mt. Milleray, Waterford, Ireland; Miss Galvin, of Ballinacally, Ireland; and the two daughters of Mrs. Martin Meagher, his sister-in-law. Testator also directed. the allocation of two sums each of £50 for masses for the repose of the souls of himself, his late wife, and daughter, and parents.

Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 - 1954) Wednesday 8 December 1920 Edition: DAILY p 1 Family Notices
O'BRIEN. - On the 7th December, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. W. Davitt, Invermay-road, Ellen, relict of the late Daniel O'Brien, and second daughter of the late Robert and Bridget Strafford, County Clare, Ireland, aged 92 years. R.I.P. (Interment at Colebrook.)

The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Tuesday 21 December 1920 p 5 Family Notices
THE LATE MRS, CATHERINE DUGGAN. A well known resident of North Fremantle, in the person of Mrs.Catherine Duggan, passed away on the 17th inst. in her 82nd year. The deceased, who was born at County Clare, Ireland, lived in Victoria thirty years, and in this State for the last 25 years. In the northern suburb, she had, in her younger days, identified herself with many charitable objects. A husband and grown-up family of seven sons, two daughters, and19 grandchildren, survive her. On Saturday afternoon, the 18th inst., the funeral cortege moved from her late residence, Victoria Avenue, North Fremantle, and proceeded to St. Anne's Church, where a short service was conducted by the Rev. John Flynn, O.M.I., and thence to the Karrakatta Cemetery, where the remains were interred in the Roman Catholic portion. The Rev. Father O'Callaghan officiated at the graveside, in the presence of numerous friends and relatives. The chief mourners were Mr, John Duggan (husband), Messrs, Thomas P, John J., William H., Daniel J., George E. Duggan (sons),- and Mr. H. Nye (nephew). The pall-bearers were Messrs. D. Hevron, J. Corkhill, I. Hickey, J. Sharpo, C. Kobelke, and W. Slattery. Many wreaths were placed on the grave, and a large number of letters, telegrams, and cards, etc, of condolence have been received by the bereaved family. The funeral arrangements, were carried out by Messrs. Arthur E, Davies and Co., of Fremantle and Claremont.

 


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