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The Henn Family of Paradise, County Clare, Ireland
 
Introduction

In 1991 I compiled some Notes on our Family, copies of which I sent to various of its members and to some others. At that time the information on which they were based was rather limited but I have since accumulated considerably more; this has enabled me to compile this revised and far more comprehensive edition. In it I have incorporated material that may be of limited interest to some but which I think is of some historical interest and merits preservation lest it be lost forever.

Responding to an advertisement some years ago, I was sent a copy of a work entitled (pretentiously) ‘The Burke’s Peerage World Book of Henns’. This purports to contain “Newly Developed Statistical Information about the Henn population in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, France, the Netherlands, South Africa, Spain and Italy”. Having assumed hitherto that the name HENN was relatively uncommon, this statistical information came as a surprise. The names and addresses of thousands of Henns in the countries stated are listed in the work and a “Total Households in Registry” is given country by country with a total of 4,992 households world-wide. Of these 1,639 are said to be in the United States, 2,644 in Germany and 205 in Great Britain (but none in Northern Ireland). These revised Notes are limited generally to the Henns of County Clare and their more direct descendants, but the above statistical information suggests that our family may well have more remote connections with Henns elsewhere in the world.

I have included in these Notes not only genealogical information on the Henn family pedigree but also some additional biographical detail, especially of the more recent members who achieved some special distinction. I have also sought to include some historical information about the Paradise estate and its history. In this connection, I recommend that, those wishing to learn more about the Henns of Paradise, their interests, and how they lived in the decades before the fire that destroyed Paradise House in 1960, should read Thomas Rice Henn’s autobiographical ‘Five Arches’ (published posthumously by Colin Smythe, Gerrards Cross, 1980), especially its first five chapters. These provide a graphic first-hand description of his early life at Paradise, to the general accuracy of which I can testify in consequence of my own boyhood summers spent at Paradise prior to the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939.

Francis Robert Henn,
Yarnhill House,
Epwell, Oxfordshire,
2008.

 
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Part 1: The Early Lineage