Clare County Library
Clare History
Home | Search Library Catalogue | Foto | Maps | Archaeology | Folklore | Genealogy | Museum | Search this Website | Copyright Notice | Visitors' Book | What's New

Witness to War 1917 – 1923: Commandant Séamus Hennessy
by Colin Hennessy

Notes

1. The United Irishmen of County Clare, Kieran Sheedy. Ennis 1997, P. 30.

2. Michael (1855 to 1932) and Bridget Hennessy (1858 to 1931) married Moy Church 27th January 1883. Children – Patrick born 1884 (Died 1968 aged 83), Michael 1885 (Died 1965, England, aged 81), Mary 1887 (Died 1936 aged 49), James 1889 (Died 1890), Margaret 1891, Joseph 1892 (Died 1915 aged 22), James (Séamus) 1894 (Died 1969 aged 75), Bridget (Delia) 1896 (Died 1988 aged 92), Anne (Nan, Sister Mary Joachim)1898 (Died 1973, London, aged 75), William 1899 (Died 1968, California), Thomas 1901 (Died 1901 aged 6 months), Augustine (Austin) 1902 (Died 1962, Chicago, aged 60).

3. Moy Conradh na Gaeilge class photograph 1917-1918.

4. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 34481) of William Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 18th April 1936.
Vol. William Hennessy (1899 – 1968). In October 1917 he joined the Irish Volunteers. Assisted his brother Séamus Hennessy throughout the period 1917 – 1923, carrying despatches and battalion documents, guarding the battalion flying column while billeted, moved and secured firearms. William took part in the attack on Lahinch R.I.C. barrack and the Moananagh ambush. Acted as a scout during the Rineen ambush and assisted in carrying wounded to safety. Later in the 1920’s he immigrated to Chicago. Eventually he enlisted in the United States army and served in World War II. He was discharged in San Francisco in 1945. He remained in San Francisco and took up employment with the city’s Water Department. Not known to have married he lost contact with his family in Ireland in the mid 1950’s. William was awarded the War of Independence service medal (1917-1921) with ‘comrac’ (combat) bar for his active service.

5. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.

6. Ibid.

7. Ibid.

8. Ibid.

9. The Southern Star 22nd September 1923, The Clare Champion 22nd September 1923, Saturday Record 22nd September 1923.
Michael Hennessy with the recommendation of District Inspector James Reid joined the R.I.C. 16th July 1908 becoming Constable 64185. He was posted to Co. Kerry 26th January 1909 where was stationed until being disbanded 13th May 1922.

10.1st Battalion - Ennis, 2nd Daragh, 3rd Corofin, 4th Ennistymon, 5th Kilfenora, 6th Ballyvaughan.

11. IRA Intellectual, Richard English, Oxford 1998, P. 105.

12. On Another Mans Wound, Ernie O’Malley, Dublin & Tralee 1979, P. 109.

13. Ernie O’Malley notebook P17B/130 1948-54. Interview Séamus Hennessy PP 42 -48. UCD Archives.

14. Reference letter from Séamus Hennessy to the Office of the Referee. Re. Application of Mrs E. Maloney, Islandbawn, Lahinch, Co. Clare for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 22nd January 1940.

15. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.1076. Anthony Malone. 30th January 1955.

16. Commandant Martin Devitt was later fatally wounded at the Crowe’s Bridge Ambush 20th February 1920.

17. Commandant Ignatius O’Neill (1896 – 1939). From Miltown Malbay, Co Clare. Son of a hardware merchant in the town P.H O’Neill. O’Neill had emigrated to America by the time of the outbreak of WWI when he crossed into Canada and enlisted in the Irish Guards. He served in Ypres and was wounded at the Battle of the Somme July 1916. After a period in Britain he returned to Ireland to recover and during this time he joined Miltown Malbay Company Clare Brigade becoming Captain. Ernie O’Malley joined him in the training of Volunteers in Cloonagh in early 1919. O’Neill’s organisational and military experience was recognised and he was promoted to Commandant 4th Battalion Mid Clare Brigade. With brigade Vice Commandant Martin Devitt he led the attack on Connolly R.I.C. barrack 21st July 1919. In October O’Neill was a member of an attacking party on an arms raid at the British coastguard in Ballyvaughan. He also took part in the raid for arms at Colonel Tottenham’s Estate, Mount Callan, November 1919. O’Neill was wounded in the thigh as Volunteers ambushed the R.I.C. at Crowe’s Bridge, Inagh, 24th February 1920 when Martin Devitt was mortally wounded. He distinguished himself in the face of enemy fire by coming to Devitt’s assistance and removing his body from the scene. He commanded Volunteers in the Rineen ambush 22nd September 1920 when a Crossley Tender with six R.I.C. was attacked and all occupants killed at Drummin Hill between Miltown Malbay and Lahinch. In the successful withdrawal and rearguard fight with crown forces he received a leg wound. He took part in the attack on Ruan R.I.C. barrack in October 1920 when following the capture of the barrack he drilled the R.I.C. on the roadside as the building burnt. At a battalion meeting December 1920 O’Neill resigned as Commandant 4th Battalion Mid Clare Brigade citing exhaustion but there were also alleged disagreements with brigade staff. Despite this later that month as he had been training the brigade’s flying column he took part in the column’s attack in Moanreel on a military convoy. With the 4th Battalion he was in the Miltown Malbay ambush 31st March 1921 when a Black and Tan was killed and another seriously wounded. O’Neill was a member of the Free State army during the civil war and at its outbreak was involved in the bombardment and shelling of the Four Courts, Dublin. At the conclusion of the Civil War he remained in the army. For many years he was chief instructor at the Curragh Military College, Co Kildare. In 1923 he married May Lehane from Lahinch, a member of Cumann na mBan. May was a sister of Vice Commandant Pake Lehane and daughter of Dan Lehane who were both killed in Sept. 1920 during reprisals following the Rineen ambush by Black and Tans and R.I.C. Her home was also burnt by crown forces. She was also the sister of Free State army Captain Donal Lehane who was killed in action at Killorglin during the Civil War in an engagement with republican forces. Ignatius and May had seven children, Ignatius, Patrick, Con, Donal, Ethel, Nora and Francis. Living in Bray, Co Wicklow, O’Neill retired from the army in March 1939 due to ill health. The effect of his numerous wounds caused his early death 10th June 1939. He was served full military honours at his funeral and is buried in Callura, Lahinch. At the unveiling of the Rineen Memorial in September 1957 Adjutant Seán Burke speaking on behalf of the veteran Volunteers of his former battalion said of O’Neill, “Ignatius was a man of physique whose heart was in the right place, and whose qualities as a leader and a soldier could not be questioned. His indomitable spirit and keen sense of humour endeared him to the hearts of the people”.

18. Commandant Steve Gallagher (1893-1945). 1917 Moy Company Captain. Took part in attack on Connolly R.I.C. barrack. From 1919 Quartermaster 4th Battalion Mid Clare Brigade. Involved in Rineen, Moanreel and Miltown Malbay ambushes. 1921 appointed Commandant 4th Battalion flying column. Took the Republican side during the Civil War. Arrested by the Free State army and interned in Limerick, Gormanstown and Mountjoy Jails.

19. Vice Commandant Anthony Malone. Born Glendine, Miltown Malbay in 1891. In 1914 he became a member of the Irish Volunteers. As Lieutenant Glendine Company he was promoted in July 1919 to Adjutant 4th Battalion Mid Clare Brigade. In December 1920 succeeded John Joe Neylon as battalion Vice Commandant. Took part in attacks on Connolly R.I.C. barrack 1919, Lahinch R.I.C. barrack April 1920, Rineen and Moananagh ambushes.

20. Vice Commandant John Joe Neylon. Known as ‘Tosser’ Neylon. Born in Emlagh, Kilfenora 1895. Captain Ennistymon Company. Took part in attacks on R.I.C. patrols at Lucey’s Wood, Curtin’s Gate and ‘81’ Cross (Two R.I.C. killed). As Vice Commandant 4th Battalion Mid Clare Brigade he took part in the Rineen ambush and as a member of the brigades’ flying column the Moanreel ambush. Arrested 7th February 1921 and tried 11th March in Limerick. Neylon was sentenced to seven years imprisonment though he was later released in December 1921. He joined the Free State army during the Civil War.

21. Blood on the Banner, Pádraig Óg Ó Ruairc, Cork & Dublin 2009, P. 98.
Connolly R.I.C. Barracks Attack, The Banner: Clare men’s and Women’s Patriotic, Benevolent
Social Association. October 26th 1963.
Attack on Connolly Hut, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 6th July 1973. Ernie O’Malley notebook P17B/130 1948-54. Interview Séamus Hennessy PP. 42 -48. UCD Archives.

22. Adjutant Sean Burke 4th Battalion MCB Officer Roll.
The Battalion Meeting, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 5th October 1973.

23. Lt.-Col. Frederick St. Leger Tottenham (1850 – 1933) of Mount Callan, D.L., J.P. Educated at Harrow. Served in the Royal Fusiliers until 1892, when he came to live in Mount Callan, which he inherited from his mother in 1891. High Sheriff, Co. Clare, 1899. His wife was daughter of the Very Rev. Thomas Garnier, Dean of Lincoln, whose wife, Lady Caroline Keppel, was the youngest daughter of the 4th Earl of Albermarle. He handed over Mount Callan to his eldest son, Robert in 1923, and spent the remaining years of his life near Dublin. His descendants continue to live and farm in Mount Callan.

24. Seamus Hennessy notes for Michael Clancy application for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934.
Politics and Irish Life 1913-1921. Provincial Experience of War and Revolution, David Fitzpatrick, Cork 1998, PP. 65 – 66. (Tottenham Family ‘Rainfall Book’ 1913-28. Entries quoted).

25. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S. 977. Patrick Kerin. 30th June 1954.
Captain Patrick “Pako” Kerin. Glendine Company. In December 1917 joined the Volunteers. In 1918 was promoted to Lieutenant and the following year Captain. In 1919 was arrested and spent a fortnight in Limerick Jail. Took part in the attacks on Connolly and Lahinch R.I.C. barracks and the Rineen Ambush.

26. Seamus Hennessy notes for Michael Clancy application for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934.
Politics and Irish Life 1913-1921. Provincial Experience of War and Revolution, David Fitzpatrick, Cork 1998, PP. 65 – 66. (Tottenham Family ‘Rainfall Book’ 1913-28. Entries quoted).

27. Hansard 27th November 1919. Written answers (Commons) IRELAND. Vol. 121 cc 1913-4W

28. Hansard 4th December 1919. Commons sitting IRELAND. Vol. 122 cc 552-3

29. Politics and Irish Life 1913-1921. Provincial Experience of War and Revolution, David Fitzpatrick, Cork 1998, PP. 67. (Tottenham Family ‘Records of Mount Callan’ Entries quoted).

30. Ibid. P. 71(Inscription in Tottenham Visitors’ Book 8th June 1923).

31. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.

32. Captain Seán (John) Burke. (1899 -1974). From Moybeg, Lahinch. Lieutenant Lahinch Company. December 1920 appointed Captain and Adjutant 4th Battalion Mid Clare Brigade. A rifleman in the Rineen ambush he also took part in most of the major actions in the battalion area. Unlike his brothers who were also Volunteers he took the Republican side during the Civil War. He was captured by the Free State army in Ennistymon and imprisoned in Limerick. Later in the 1920s and the decades that followed he became Ireland’s most noted and famous golfer as a member of Lahinch golf club. In the 1970s he chronicled the activities of the 4th Battalion and his golfing career in a popular series of articles in the Connacht Tribune.

33. Seamus Hennessy notes for Michael Clancy application for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934.
Burning of R.I.C. Barracks at Lahinch, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 27th July 1973. Application (MSP/1) OF William Hennessy for a service Certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 18th April 1936. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.
Patrick Hillery - The Official Biography, John Walsh. Dublin 2008, P. 10.

34. The 53 participants according to Battalion Adjutant Sean Burke were drawn from seven of the nine companies in the 4th Battalion MCB. Ennistymon, Glendine, Inagh, Lahinch, Letterkelly, Miltown Malbay and Moy. Lavereen or Ballyea did not have Volunteers active in Rineen. The participants were - Michael Nestor, John Joe Neylon, Ned Hynes, Jimmy Gallagher, Anthony Malone, Pako Kerin, Dave Kenneally, Pat Frawley, Martin Frawley, Johnny Burke, Brian O’Loughlin, Dan McMahon, Paddy McGough, John Callaghan, John Clune, John Donnellan, Jack Fitzgibbon, John Rynne, Martin Marrinan, James Meany, Dan Callaghan, Martin Hehir, Pake Lehane, Donal Lehane, John Burke, Tom Burke, Mickey Reynolds, Mikie O’Dwyer, Paddy Queally, Paddy Foley, Murt Hynes, Mickie Hayes, John Crawford, Anthony O’Brien, Mort O’Connor, John Murray, James Rynne, Ignatius O’Neill, Bobby O’Neill, Ned Lynch, John McMahon, Tommy Moroney, Joe Darcy, Michael O’Keeffe, John Fitzgerald, Thomas O’Connell, Jack Hurley, Séamus Hennessy, Steve Gallagher, Joe Nagle, Pete Vaughan, Micklo Curtin, Tim O’Connell.

35. Raids and Rallies, Ernie O’Malley. Dublin 1982, P. 68.

36. Ibid. P 70. The four rifle men were Steve Gallagher, Sean Burke, Pako Kerin and Anthony Malone.

37. Vol. John Clune. (1894-1925). Inagh Company. Born in Clontismara, Inagh. Took part in the Rineen and Moananagh ambushes. Following the War of Independence and Civil War his health went into decline. He emigrated to Australia in 1923 but due to continuing ill health he left to return to Ireland on the ship ‘Ormuz’. The ship log testifies he died on board of ‘sarcoma of the right lung’. He was buried at sea in the Mediterranean, west of Crete.

38. Royal Irish Constabulary fatalities. Constable Reginald Hardman, 21, London (Ex Royal Artillery Regiment). Constable Michael Harte, 28, Sligo. Constable John Hodnett, 31, Cork. Constable Michael Kelly, 32, Roscommon. Constable John McGuire, 21, Mayo. Sergeant Michael Hynes, 29, Roscommon. (Later died of wounds received).

39. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S. 1042. John J. Neylon. 11th December 1954.

40. Raids and Rallies, Ernie O’Malley. Dublin 1982, P. 73.

41. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S. 977. Patrick Kerin. 30th June 1954.
Vol. Michael Curtin. Known as “Micklo”. Moy Company. From Lackamore, Lahinch. Emigrated to the United States following the War of Independence.

42. Ambush at Rineen, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 21st September 1973.

43. Sean Keane, murdered by British Army. P.J. Linnane, murdered by R.I.C. & Black and Tans. James Sammon, murdered by R.I.C. & Black and Tans. Tom Connole, murdered by R.I.C. & Black and Tans. Norah Fox, suffered a fatal fall fleeing from R.I.C. & Black and Tans (Source Padraig Óg Ó Ruairc). Dan Lehane, murdered by R.I.C. & Black and Tans. (Died of wounds).

44. Vice Comdt. Pake Lehane 4th Battn. M.C.B. Burned to death in fire started by R.I.C. & Black and Tans.

45. The Irish Independent 27th September 1920. P. 5.

46. Padraig Óg Ó Ruairc. Draft article. www.warofindependence.info

47. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.1076. Anthony Malone. [Link to http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1076.pdf] 30th January 1955.

48. Ambushes and Armour - The Irish Rebellion 1919 – 1921, W.H. Kautt. Dublin 2010, P. 95.

49. Ernie O’Malley notebook P17B/130 1948-54. Interview John (Sean) Burke p 51 - 57. UCD Archives.

50. Ibid.

51. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.1076. Anthony Malone.

52. The Battalion Meeting, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 5th October 1973.

53. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.1076. Anthony Malone.

54. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.

55. Ibid.

56. Attack on Miltown Malbay, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 19th October 1973.

57. Ibid.

58. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S. 1074. [Link to http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1074.pdf]John Jones.

59. Attack on Miltown Malbay, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 19th October 1973.

60. Ibid.

61. Ibid.

62. Police Casualties in Ireland 1919-1922, Richard Abbott, Cork & Dublin 2000.

63. The Clare Champion Saturday April 9th 1921.

64. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.

65. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.1076. Anthony Malone. 30th January 1955.

66. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S. 977. Patrick Kerin. 30th June 1954.

67. Commdt. Andy O’Donoghue Memoirs. Ennistymon Parish Magazine.

68. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.1076. Anthony Malone.

69. Missing in Action – British servicemen secretly buried in Clare during the War of Independence. Pádraig Óg Ó Ruairc. Unpublished article 2011.
A/07304 Irish Military Archives.
P7/A/20 Mulcahy Papers U.C.D. Archives.

70. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.1076. Anthony Malone. 30th January 1955.

71. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S. 977. Patrick Kerin. 30th June 1954.

72. The Moananagh Ambush, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 1973.

73. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.1076. Anthony Malone. 30th January 1955.

74. The War in Clare, 1911-1921: Personal Memoirs of the War of Independence, Michael Brennan. Dublin 1980, P. 15.

75. The Moananagh Ambush, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 1973.

76. Bureau of Military History 1913 – 1921. Statement by Witness document No. W.S.984. Séamus McMahon. 11th August 1954.

77. BMHS1728. Mid Clare Brigade.

78. Eamon de Valera & The Banner County, Kevin J Browne, Dublin 1982 PP. 127 – 128.

79. The Taking Over of Ennistymon Barracks, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 1973.
Blood on the Banner, Pádraig Og O’Ruairc Cork & Dublin 2009, P. 291.
Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.

80. Ernie O’Malley notebook P17B/130 1948-54. Interview Séamus Hennessy PP. 42 -48. UCD Archives.
Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.

81. The Taking Over of Ennistymon Barracks, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 1973.

82. Ernie O’Malley notebook P17B/130 1948-54. Interview Séamus Hennessy PP. 42 -48. UCD Archives.
Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.

83. Séamus Hennessy O/C 4th Battn to Brigade Commandant Mid Clare 22 July, Army Archives F BARRETT Papers, A/1012. 1922.

84. Séamus Hennessy O/C 4TH Battn to Brigade Commandant Mid Clare 24 July, Army Archives F BARRETT Papers, A/1012 Lot 24. 1922.

85. Séamus Hennessy O/C 4TH Battn to Brigade Commandant Mid Clare 18 July, Army Archives F BARRETT Papers, A/1012 Lot 24. 1922.

86. Séamus Hennessy O/C 4TH Battn to Brigade Commandant Mid Clare 24 July, Army Archives F BARRETT Papers, A/1012 Lot 24. 1922.

87. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.

88. Additional Statement dated 17th March 1935. Re. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934.

89. Application (MSP 34/1 REF 17178) of Séamus Hennessy for a service certificate under the Military Service Pension Act 1934 dated 3rd April 1935.
Tadhg Crowley (1890 -12th March 1970). After being defeated in the 1924 Limerick by-election as a republican candidate he was first elected to Dáil Éireann as a Fianna Fáil candidate for the Limerick constituency at the June 1927 general election. He was re-elected at each subsequent general election until he lost his seat at the 1937 general election. He regained his seat at the 1938 general election and was re-elected at the 1943 general election but lost his seat again at the 1944 general election. He was elected to the 5th Seanad in 1944 on the Industrial and Commercial Panel. He was defeated at the 1948 Seanad election. He was once more elected to the Dáil at the 1951 general election and was re-elected at the 1954 general election. He did not contest the 1957 general election but did contest the 1957 Seanad election and was again elected to Industrial and Commercial Panel in the 9th Seanad. He did not contest the 1961 Seanad election.

90. Mary Hennessy application for a Service (1917-1921) Medal (not dated). Authorisation of Medal dated 10th October 1945.

91. Cesare Sabelli (1897-1984). Born in Montepulciano, Italy. Enlisted in the air wing of the Italian army during the First World War, saw combat duty, and earned recognition as an "Asso" (Ace) of the Italian Air Force. At the conclusion of the war, Sabelli emigrated to the United States. He focused on the notion of flying non-stop from New York to Rome that would require years of preparation. The mid-1920s witnessed an escalating interest in transatlantic crossings that had not yet seen a solo flight until the success of Charles Lindbergh's New York to Paris flight in 1927. Sabelli, however wanted to surpass Lindbergh's feat by being the first to fly non-stop from New York to Rome, a much greater distance. By 1929 Sabelli, together with a group of Italian Americans obtained financing for the flight of the "Roma," a plane designed by Giuseppe Bellanca that would have a crew of three Italian Americans including the first commercial passenger Dr. Leon Piscuilli who paid a ‘fare’ of $38,000 to accompany Sabelli. September 20 1928 due to a mechanical engine problem, the "Roma" was forced after 22 minutes to abort its mission. Despite this during the flight there was another first as a radio transmission was sent from the plane, Sabelli relaying a radio message to Guglielmo Marconi who was waiting in London to receive the transmission his invention had made possible. By 1932 Giuseppe Bellanca had designed another plane, the "Leonardo Da Vinci," that was capable of reaching over forty hours of non-stop cruising. On May 14, 1934, with Sabelli at the helm and with George Pond (1889-1935) of the famous cosmetic manufacturing family as co-pilot, the "Leonardo Da Vinci" took off from Brooklyn's Floyd Bennett Field. 32 hours later after crossing the Atlantic Ocean the plane crash landed in Cloneyogan, Moy, Lahinch. After repairs and further stops in Dublin, Cardiff and London the “Leonardo Da Vinci” eventually arrived in Rome 12th June. The end for the flight came on the return attempt from Rome in August. Flying over the Welsh Pembrokeshire coast, in bad weather the plane struck the side of Carne Ingli Mountain and overturned. Again the Pilots survived though badly shaken. The “Leonardo da Vinci” was damaged beyond repair and would never fly again. Parts were shipped to New York by Sabelli as souvenirs. Sabelli retired from flying in the 1940’s and became owner of an art and antique business in New York. He passed away aged 86 in 1984.

92. Interview James Francis Hennessy (Nephew).
Fianna Fáil - A Biography of the Party, Noel Whelan, Dublin 2011 PP. 22 – 27. Quoting Dunphy.The Making of Fianna Fáil Power in Ireland P. 75.

93. The Irish Press 17th May 1934 (Front Page).

94. The Irish Press 23rd May 1934 P.2.

95. Authors own notes on “Leonardo da Vinci” Flight. The Clare Champion, Friday 31st October 2008. P.17. Commemorating Clare’s first plane crash.

96. Ernie O’Malley notebook P17B/130 1948-54. Interview Seamus Hennessy pp 42 -48. UCD Archives.

97. Raids and Rallies, Ernie O’Malley, PP. 66-90

98. With the I.R.A. In the Fight for Freedom, PP. 67-77

99. In Memory of the Battle of Rineen, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 30th November 1973.

100. Clare Old I.R.A. Honour Two Former Comrades, Connacht Tribune 27th September 1958.

101. The President Welcomed at Rineen, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 21st December 1973.

102. F.C.A. Take Charge of Rineen Memorial, Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 14th December 1973.

103. A Busy Day for Survivors of the Fourth Battalion (North-West Clare), Sean Burke, Connacht Tribune 7th December 1973.

 

 

Witness to War 1917-1923 - Commandant Seamus Hennessy


l