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Ordnance Survey Letters by John O'Donovan and Eugene Curry, 1839

Parish of Kilfarboy (b)

The old Church of Kilfarboy stands in the Townland of Kilfarboy, to which it gives its name, measuring sixty five feet nine inches in length and seventeen feet in breadth, the walls in good preservation excepting the west gable which is down to the height of the side walls.

There is a pointed doorway in the south side at the distance of fourteen feet from the west gable, six feet four inches high and three feet six inches wide, built up in front with well cut stones and having a Holy Water font inserted in the wall on the right hand side as one goes in. Six feet three inches from the east gable in the same side is a pointed window, seven feet high and three feet wide inside, four feet from the ground outside where it measures four and a half feet in height and six and three-quarter inches in breadth at top and seven and a half inches at bottom, having its sides perforated for iron bars. There is a pointed window in the east gable measuring six feet nine inches in height on the inside and three feet in breadth, and four feet ten inches in height and seven inches in breadth on the outside, the sides perforated for the reception of iron bars. The walls are built for the most part of long thin quarry stones.

There is another ruined Church in the Townland of Moymore in this Parish, called Teampall-Inis-Dia, i.e., the Church of the Island of God, but why it is so called nobody knows. This ruin stands on a point of land formed by the meeting of two small streams, whence probably the origin of the island part of the name. The Church measures forty feet in length and nineteen and a half feet in breadth, the walls remaining to their original height excepting the east gable, of which half the top is down. The doorway was placed in the south side but none of its features now remain. There is a window in the south wall six feet ten inches from the east gable measuring five and a half feet in height and three feet four inches wide inside where it is semicircular at top, three feet from the ground outside where it is pointed and measures three feet four inches in height and ten in breadth, built up of cut stones and having its sides perforated for the reception of iron bars. There is a window in the east gable measuring about ten feet in height and five feet three inches in breadth on the inside where its top is semicircular, and built of well cut stones.

The top is broken in front, but it appears to have been divided into two parts by a mullion, which however, has disappeared - each division was nine inches in breadth. No burying ground here.

 

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