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Ordnance Survey Letters by John O'Donovan and Eugene Curry, 1839

Parish of Kilfarboy (c)

About half a furlong north of the ruin is a Holy Well dedicated to Inghean-Bhaoith of Kilneboy, at which devotions continue to be performed on Sundays and Thursdays up to this time.

Small portions of the north and west sides of a Castle remain in the Townland of Moymore in this Parish and of which the following notices occur in the Annals of the Four Masters:-

A.D. 1570. The Earl of Thomond was seized with sorrow and regret for having given up his towns and prisoners, for he now only retained one of his fortresses, viz., Magh-O’mBracain. In this, he left faithful and long tried wardens and having resolved that he would never submit himself to the law or commit himself to the mercy of the Irish Council, he chose the alternative of being proclaimed and outlawed, and of bidding farewell for ever to his patrimonial inheritance rather than appear before them. He accordingly remained for some time concealed in Clann-Maurice and passed from thence about the Festival of St. John into France where he stopped for some time; he afterwards went to England and received favours, pardon and honors from the Queen who sent by him letters to the Irish Council, commanding them to pay him respect.

A.D. 1571. The Earl of Thomond (Conor, the son of Donogh O’Brien) gave up his Country and his Lordship to the President as an atonement for the wrong which he had formerly done him and also gave up to him Magh-O’mBracain the only town then belonging to him.

There is a hill on the border of this Parish, in the Parish of Kilmannaheen in Corcomroe in the Townland of Ceathramha-an-tSeideain, called at present Cnoc-a-Chip, but mentioned in the Annals of the Four Masters at the year 1573 under the name of Cnoc-Bheoil-an-Chip. We thought it was in the Parish of Kilfarboy.

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                                                                                                              Kilrush,
                                                                                                              6th November 1839.

Dear Sir,
We have received the first half of our money here this evening but we cannot wait here for the other half notes, please to send them to Killadysart where we will be - Deo volente, on tomorrow evening. Our delay at Killadysart will not, however, be long as we have only three Parishes to visit from it. The great delay now will be occasioned by the writing and the ancient Map, both which must be carefully attended to.

                                                                                                 Your obedient servant,
                                                                                                              John O’Donovan

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                                                                                                              Kilrush,
                                                                                                              6th November 1839.

Dear Sir,
The Baronies of Inchiquin, Burren and Corcumroe having now been disposed of, we commence the Barony of Ibricken.

 

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